Outlet in kitchen acting wierd

Please bear with me, because I will completely butcher the names of things...Ok, here goes
I've got an outlet in my kitechen that has a T and R button. One of the plugs always works, the other plug sometimes goes out and I need to push the T then the R button to get it to work. Does this outlet need to be replaced?
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It is designed to protect you from electical shock in the event you accidently come in contact with the electricity because of a bad cord, applicance, or other problem. They have been required in kitchens in other damp locations for many years.
The T button (Test) is for testing proper operation; when you push it, the electricity to both receptacles should turn off. The T button simulates the type of problem the device is intended to protect against.
The R button (Reset) restore proper operation after a test, or a real problem occurs.
Both receptacles in the outlet should act the same. If not, then there is a problem with the GFCI and it should be replaced. This doesn't mean there isn't also a problem with whatever it is you are plugging into the outlet, but from the symptoms you describe, it is most likely just a bad GFCI.
HTH,
Paul
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On Wed, 12 Jan 2005 05:17:26 -0500, Paul Franklin

imho:
Good advice. If a GFCI is 'faulty' in behavor, just like any safety device ti should be 'failing' in a safe condition. This case tripped. If the GFCI's are over 10 old in you house, you might want to have all of them tested, and if this one you are working on is acting up, get it replaced. This inconvience isn't expensive to replace, plus it's a peace of mind issue.
later,
tom @ www.URLBee.com

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On Wed, 12 Jan 2005 08:47:02 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@intertainia.com wrote:

Sounds to me like someone wired the power to the load side. Check that first.
Dan
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I had such a faulty GFCI on the hot tub. It would trip at random moments. I was very inexperienced then and spent a long asking questions on this newsgroup and testing this and that. Finally it dawned on me to replace the GFCI and see if it would help. Magically, it did, now it's been a year and the spa never trips.
My system is a regular 110V 15A spa.
i
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Ignoramus13229 wrote:

You may have had a GFCI with a trip level close to the 4 ma lower leakage limit than the 6 ma upper limit.
There's some pretty good "hands on" stuff about GFCIs here:
http://www.ecmweb.com/mag/electric_think_gfci /
Jeff
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Thanks, excellent artice.
i
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