Outdoor faucets

Both of my outdoor faucets leak. I thought it might have been the threads, but after applying plumbing tape to the threads and securing the hose, I saw that the leak was actually coming from both faucets. I'm not very effecient when it comes to plumbing....Home Depot was telling me to just cut it off on the copper line and bring them in. Should I hire a plumber?
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I don't if there is any harm to using tape on the hose, but it wouldn't help either. The rubber washer is what stops water from leaking out. But since that's not your problem...
The first thing you want to do is to tighten the nut around the valve stem. That does wonders for stopping all manner of leaks. If that doesn't help (and it always has for me) then you have a more serious problem.
Do you live where the weather gets cold and forget to shut the water off to the faucet and then to open the faucet? You may well have cracked the faucet and nothing short of a replacement will help. Unless you know how to replace it (they really told you to cut it off?) it is a job for a plumber, or at least a handyman. It might also just be worn out and need a washer or new packing, but those are also jobs for someone who has done it before unless you are adventurous.
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<< Should I hire a plumber? >>
With your level of plumbing knowledge it would be foolish not to bring in a good plumber. Replacing a sill cock (outside faucet) is not neurosurgery but does need some skill and knowledge. Be there and observe the faucet being replaced and you will have a start on understanding something of the plumbing trade. From there you can decide what small jobs around the house you can comfortably deal with. HTH
Joe
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JJ wrote:

From here I am not sure exactly what is leaking. Normally plumbing tape will not stop a leak that started by itself. In fact it is possible there is no leak at all. freeze proof faucets can hold a lot of water in them after being shut off. It will drain out after it is turned off and my look like a leak.
If you can get by replacing a washer, that you should be able to do yourself. If you need to replace the whole thing, I suggest getting a pro, based on what you have indicated about your skill level to be. If it requires soldering, that is something of a skill that needs to be learned.
I do suggest going back to Home Depot and buying their book on general DIY book for home owners. Read up and see the photos. That might help you decide if it may just be a washer needed.
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Joseph E. Meehan

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Sounds like you do not have freeze proof faucets and forgot to turn them off in the basement and drain them in the winter.
My problem is that my basement shutoff for outside is a gate valve that does not close tight. So I wrap the faucet in fiberglass and put a jumbo foam plastic cup over it in winter to insulate it, and in coldest weather leave a light on in the basement near it to give it some heat.
One of these days I need to replace that gate valve with a ball valve and/or install a freeze proof faucet.
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Sounds like you need to: 1. try a new washer in the hose end (if the end of the hose leaks -- Teflon tape will do nothing for hose threads, only tapered pipe threads) 2. try tightening the packing nut around the faucet handle shaft (if it is leaking at the shaft) 3. call a plumber (given your professed lack of knowledge/experience with plumbing, it'll be done right and (*hopefully*) with first class materials, vs the *sometimes* second class items found at the big box stores) -- and if you have any other little plumbing projects get them done at the same time (if 1 and 2 above do not work and/or it leaks elsewhere.
You could have a freezeproof faucet installed (the shutoff is a foot to 18" back, indoors) if you're in an area where freezing occurs, you could also have a new quarter turn ball valve type inside shutoff installed in place of the globe or gate valve (both multiturn classic type valves).
You can also buy heavy hemipheric foam cop type covers for mild freeze protection, but in more severe climates freezeproof or manual internal shutoff is best.
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