outdoor faucet/hose/quick connect question...


I've used the plastic quick connect couplers on the front and back hoses for years. Over time they'd degrade and break or crack so early Spring of 07, I replaced both hoses with longer ones and all the plastic couplers/adapters with brass ones (that was a bit of an investment I tell you, especially considering my wife's collection of nozzles and sprinklers.) Put a good rubber Craftsman hose on the front faucet and what I thought was a good industrial hose from Sam's on the back. No problems with the front set up, but the back gave us fits with water pressure. Sometimes we'd have a good flow, sometimes not, and it usually flucuated during any watering session. If you'd pop the nozzle off and reseat it the pressure usually came back. Needless to say this made watering a pain, but we got used to it. This trick didn't work with a set sprinkler so my wife would end up doing a lot of the garden by hand or many sessions of moving the sprinkler. Last week she came in really riled up, there was no pressure at all. I checked indoor facets and the front outdoor one, all was fine so no problems with the water main. I was scratching my head when it dawned on me that the one thing I never checked was the brass couplers on the back hose and nozzles. Removed them and did we have water pressure! So much that my wife complained that nonadjustable nozzle was beating up her plants. I swapped nozzles and she was happy. She put on the new fancy garden sprinkler she bought last year that never worked for her and it worked beautifully. So my question is, what's going on? The new rubber hose with brass couplers works fine in the front, but the 'Sam's' hose in the back doesn't. The house was built in 1949 and as far as I know still has the original plumbing to the outside faucets. While we're staying away from the brass couplers in the back (gad, I could have bought some cool toys/gadgets for what I dumped on them...) I'd appreciate anyone's explanation. Thanks, Larry =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-Larry Dawsonhttp://web.mac.com/capnlarry snipped-for-privacy@macosx.com
"I don't know whether it's a virtue or a vice in me, but regularly rereading favorite books has always been one of the quasi- religious ceremonies with which I occupy my life."     Fritz Leiber
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:
<long story of woe with hoses snipped>
You have a working setup in front and non-working setup in back. Should be simple enough to swap one part at a time from front to back and back to front. When the problem follows the swap, you know the culprit.
It could be that one of the brass couplings isn't fully engaging, limiting flow sometimes. Or it could be some weird defect in the hose that is temperature dependent even...ok when hose is hot in sun, not ok otherwise...
Did you buy all the brass fittings at the same time/place? I've found that they are not usually interchangeable between brands. Look at them closely to make sure they are all the same.
HTH,
Paul F.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The female couplers that you talk about with the auto shutoff don't work very well. Even with the male part plugged in the flow is less than optimum. You can verify this yourself by timing how long it takes to fill a bucket with and without them.
I replaced mine with the ones that don't shutoff when unplugged.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

yeah I tried those quick disconnects too and tossed them. low flow was the norm.
its easier to always leave my hoses connected....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My experience has been only the quick connects that auto shutoff when unplugged have low flow. The 'cheaper' ones that are just a connector work great.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.