Outdoor Christmas lights

Page 2 of 2  

gcotterl wrote:

That has been the standard for many years so unless your existing strings are pretty old they are likely already the kind where if one bulb burns out the rest stays lit.
Where this doesn't help you is if one bulb is making a bad connection or is missing entirely. Then the whole string (or section) does go out. I think you will have trouble finding new strings that are any better in this respect. Bulbs can burn out, but they cannot be missing or loose. LEDs might not have this issue, but that is all I would buy anyway for other reasons.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sounds like the OP is using series string lights? AIUI those are usually less waterproof and less rugged than lighting strings intended for outdoor use and where more commonly, each bulb is attched to both the hot and neutral wires. i.e. each bulb is operating at 115 volts etc. BTW what we usually do is to reduce the voltage on our strings of lights by some form of step-down transformer or by puttinng two strings of lights in series. This is epecially a good idea on lights on a indoor Christmas tree. So bulbs are less hot and last much longer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.