OTA antenna mount

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Tom Oska wrote:

With a rotor? OP said he needs rotor.
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Why not ? The antenna is only about 3'x4'. There may be enough room to mount it. That is if the house does not have a conductive roof.
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Roof is asphalt shingles.
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due to distance factor.
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GoHabsGo wrote:

I doubt you'd encounter a detectable difference between an antenna in the attic and one mounted above the roof. The difference in height would be, what, four feet?
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Under roof costs about a 30% signal loss thru normal plywood sheathing and shingles.
Add rain or snow even greater loss, espically bad with digital signals.......
Outside is the only weay to go!
and add rotor for most reliable reception
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There is plenty of space to mount it in the attic, however, my location relative to the transmission towers is at the outer fringe, so I think for most consistent reception, I will need to go outside.
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Just put it on the peak of your roof, and screw it into the rafters / trusses thru the shingles. closer to the peak mean less water run off from above, pre drill the holes and fill them with some good goop then bolt a tripod stand down. if you goop it well, it shouldn't leak for a while, check it once a year and your good.
ps.. go leafs.
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With freezing, thawing, wind, rain, snow attacking those holes, it is only a matter of time before it will leak. It is almost guaranteed to do so. I will avoid any penetration of my shingles for this reason. I had a previous installation of a dish on my previous home's roof that was all gooped up and still leaked.

If I was a Leaf fan, I would be good to go with my CBC HD transmission from the CN Tower. At least I'll see them play the Habs a few times a year.
Larry
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I used a "tripod" mount on my roof. It's held in place by three good sized wood screws through the singles and roof sheathing. One leg of the tripod is held to the angle bracket via a bolt and nut. When you put a mast on the tripod you can remove that bolt and tilt it over. One person can install things if you have a board to keep the system from completely flopping over in "tilt" mode.
I have a 6' mast in the tripod with a rotator and another 6' mast with antenna. Because of overlap, etc. the antenna is about 11' above the ridge.
I used sealing compound under the bracket and over the "lag screw." You don't really have to worry much about roof leaks from holes near the ridge because there just isn't much water up there. It's toward the bottom that you have to be careful about holes in the shingles.
I am a nut for grounding. I have #6 copper running from the tripod and mast to both ends of the ridge and into separate grounds which are also bonded to the house ground.
I used RG-59 but I will soon replace it with RG-6 to get a little more signal. There are tall trees around our property and our antenna still isn't high enough. Maybe I will put in a 10' mast and have a more direct run when I put in the RG-6.
With the transition to digital, I fear I may end up with less stations because I can't get reliable service on the digital version of several channels. (We are about 60-70 miles from the transmitter towers.)
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