OT Windows 10

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On 8/1/2015 2:18 PM, J0HNS0N wrote:

It can be removed. Right click on the task bar, properties, and you can choose what shows.
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On 8/1/2015 3:05 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I've been reading this thread trying to figure out if it's a good idea to get that win10 or if I should wait a while. Am I right in saying it'd be better to wait to make sure all the bugs are worked out of it?
--
Emma

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On 08/01/2015 04:07 PM, Emma D. wrote:

Based on previous experience many times over, Microsoft introduces new versions before they've finished getting the bugs out of the previous ones.
Perce
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On 8/1/2015 3:41 PM, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Are you going to wait, or just keep your current version indefinitely?
--
Emma

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On 08/01/2015 05:02 PM, Emma D. wrote:

No, I updated my desktop machine but not (yet) the notebook.
But I am rather fussy about what I run on my Windows machines. E.g., as little email as possible. The Windows desktop is primarily for use with a rather specialized piece of hardware for which the only software is for Windows. The notebook primarily for use away from home, and now mostly with Linux.
Perce
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On 8/1/2015 5:29 PM, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

I think I understand what you mean. How do you like the windows 10?
--
Emma

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On Sat, 01 Aug 2015 16:41:07 -0400, "Percival P. Cassidy"

The insidious thing about this OS is they will start charging you for the updates in a year or so. W/10 is designed to be s subscription service, that is why it was distributed for free. Sort of like those AOL disks that were everywhere.
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On 8/1/2015 11:56 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Do you have evidence of charging in the future? I've seen unsubstantiated rumor, no facts.
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It is a pretty pervasive rumor. The only question is how much is subscription and what the "free" guys get.
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It's not a new idea. M$ has been trying to get the general public to cozy up to the idea for yrs. But, with Linux looming at every corner, who is gonna embrace the idea of never actually owning yer OS.
Adobe had no such reservations. All you can get from Adobe, now, is new subscriptions for Photoshop. I think Autodesk did the same with AutoCad. Not sure, as I've been using Linux fer 15 yrs, so don't get into arguments over M$ or Apple. ;)
nb
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Subscription software is far from a new idea. IBM was charging by the month for their mainframe OS when Gates made the original DOS deal.
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No doubt. And like most enterprises, can easily afford them.
When the PC went public, all that changed. Now the corps that be are trying to put the I-now-own-it buying public on the same pay plan. I suspect more resistance from granny Growler and Ronnie Rub-One-Out. But, maybe not. Ppl are changing to mobil devices which have always been subscription. Perhaps it's no big deal to the gullible masses.
nb
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| > The insidious thing about this OS is they will start charging you for | > the updates in a year or so. | > W/10 is designed to be s subscription service, that is why it was | > distributed for free. | | Do you have evidence of charging in the future? I've seen | unsubstantiated rumor, no facts.
One might ask that the other way around: What makes you think they won't be charging? Where have you been that you don't know this is Microsoft's longterm plan?
There are ads on the Start Menu. The Win10 version of Solitaire presents with an option to either see ads with each play or to pay a subscription. (A crappy little program like Solitaire, and you can't even buy it. You can only rent!) I know this just from reading news online in the 3 days since Win10s release. Microsoft are gradually phasing out MS Office, to be replaced with the online rental version. So how do you *not* know that rental is their longterm plan?
Microsoft have made very clear, for several years now, that their business has been recast as "devices and services". Here's a quote from 3 years ago:
http://thedroidguy.com/2012/10/ballmer-microsoft-now-a-device-and-services-company-38477
The devices part is all but kaput, given that they've managed to entirely destroy Nokia, which used to make 40% of all cellphones, and that the Windows/Metro smart phones have been a near total failure. Their Surface tablet has seen some success, but in general MS charges too much for their hardware. And they seemed to hint when Surface came out that they were mostly trying to "set an example" for tablet makers.
So it's mostly services. They're not mentioning software anymore. Microsoft used to be the biggest *software* company in the world, and they no longer advertise that as their product. Shouldn't that tell you something? It's not only their ads. It's also their official stated position to ther media and shareholders.
The Privacy terms now include Windows. I don't know when that started, but I don't remember seeing any privacy terms in XP or Win7. The very idea that one needs a legal privacy document for an operating system is a radical step.
Microsoft started all of this back in 1998. The Active Desktop theme was meant to put ads on the Desktop. Remeber the Channel Bar? It was a billboard with ads for Disney and others, stuck to the Desktop. A number of companies paid to get icons pre-installed on Win98, in hopes that people would "subscribe to their channel", which meant getting a dynamic ad fixed to the Desktop. (There were dozens of such icons from ther likes of Forbes, I think Citibank, etc, in a folder that, if I remember correctly, was Windows\Web\Media\ on win98/ME)
There were also "Internet keyboards". Computing was moving to the Internet, or so all the media crowed. Anyone who wasn't a loser would be throwing away their PC to get a "thin client" -- a tiny, crappy PC for using online services.
Microsoft's Hailstorm mess was another attempt at services. Software as a Service (SaaS) has been a mostly failed, industry-wide fad since the mid-2000s.
It's all based on some simple facts: Computers used to cost a lot of money and buying new gear was always worthwhile. Software was the same. Moving from a 400 MHz CPU to a 450, and from Photoshop 4 to Photoshop 5, was a must for commercial users, despite costing them thousands of dollars. But hardware and software have both matured. That's why phones are the big thing now. That's why the PC era is "dead". That's why rental and services. Not because people stopped using PCs but because there are no longer crazy profit margins. (The development of high speed access has also played a big part. Services simply weren't feasible in 2000, with dial-up.)
Given all of that, there's an industrywide fad that's currently at high heat: rental. Phones are essentially rented. Software is becoming subscription. Since most people won't really need to buy version X+1 of program XYZ, the only way now to make it a steady income source is to rent it.
Rental is also a big factor in the trend toward system restrictions. PCs have been heading toward interactive TV for a long time now. But if you can install all of the free or cheap software that you need then you won't rent it. Options are to charge for the OS and/or make it very difficult for people to use their own software, by manufacturing incompatibility, increasing restrictions, etc. They've already got the average person afraid to touch anything that didn't come from a big, approved corporation. And Metro apps require a license to write, as well as a 30% extortion fee to Microsoft in order to sell through their store. (The double edged sword of security again. The new apps, whether MS or Apple or Google, are increasingly hard to get and use except through the respective, official, rental and sales portal.)
You might think that extortion is a strong word, but I can write Windows software today, put it online, and people can use it. I do that now. I don't need any license or payment to Microsoft. That's not true of Metro apps. They're only allowed to be sandboxed trinkets, with little access to the system, with MS in control. (Ironically, apps are becoming a nasty privacy problem, despite being sandboxed: They often get access to things like location data and then sell that to advertisers running ads in the apps.)
Some might say that all of this is because the public is unwilling to pay for product. Yet the public used to pay $600+ for Photoshop. Now they don't even have that option. Photoshop is still installed on a computer. It's not really online at all. But it pretends to be online and one can only get it as rental software. Either way -- whether we want to assign blame and if so, to whom -- rental is the future, at least for the foreseeable future.
You seem to think all the talk about rental and privacy problems is a lot of negative gossip mongering. Speaking for myself, I write Windows software; I want and need to know what's going on and how the market is moving; I need to know what changes to expect when writing software in the future. I also follow news and technical information about such things as privacy and online security. So I'm uniquely placed to know about things that the general public has no idea of. Microsoft spends billions on marketing. They also get lots of softball reviews from the lapdog media. Look for the business-centric NYT, for instance, to cover only as much of the negative as they absolutely have to in order to maintain a veneer of credibility among the suckers who turn to the NYT for information. The tech media are likely to be worse. If they don't play ball with MS they won't get fast access to press releases and interviews.
So, speaking for myself, I write about this stuff because there is such a dearth of balanced information out there. I figure that people have a right to know the facts and make their own decisions. Wouldn't you want someone to do that in fileds where you have no knowledge or expertise? I'm not telling people not to buy Win10. I'm saying, "Here's what you're in for. Don't walk into it blind". If you want Win10 that's none of my business. Likewise, if people want to know the risks and down sides of Win10 then the fans have no business trying to shout down the people telling them.
Case in point: How many current Facebook addicts would have guessed, back when they started using a free bulletin board, that they'd end up having to see ads and give up privacy just to reach their friends? and every step of the way a few have said, "This is outrageous! I've a good mind to quit Facebook right now!" Then they'd log in again. Now, as Sheryl Snadberg so creepily put it, Facebookies friends *are* the advertisers:
http://thenextweb.com/facebook/2012/02/29/facebook-introduces-premium-a-marketers-dream-a-users-nightmare/
?It enables brands to find their voices? and to have genuine, personal relationships with their customers?
(Brand here is a euphemism for corporate advertisers.)
Windows is going the same way, in very small steps so as not to alienate people. And look at how well MS is doing: They now have a privacy policy for Windows and ads on the Start Menu, yet you think it's merely unsubstantiated rumor that things are changing! (You know the one about cooking frogs? Supposedly if you raise the heat slowly enough they'll never jump out of the pan.)
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On Sunday, August 2, 2015 at 9:50:14 AM UTC-4, Mayayana wrote:

So show us some credible reviews, articles, etc about Win 10 that says this is MSFT's intention. Show us where MSFT has said they are going to charge for Win 10 updates. I've read several articles from sources that cover the industry and haven't seen it. My bet is that it's from the tin hat wearing crowd.

Note that MSFT transforming to a devices and services company does not equate to they will be charging me for updates to Win 10.

Sure, so show us some credible industry sources that say that MSFT is going to charge us for Win 10 updates.

So far, I don't see anyone here buying Win 10. I do see people getting it for free.
If you

Is Facebook charging their users a fee?
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On 8/2/2015 9:51 AM, Mayayana wrote:

Sell stuff and make a profit? Whooda thought.

I just played a couple of games to see the ads. I saw none. Yes, there is an opportunity to upgrade, but that was under the menu. I mentioned befor I bought card games from goodsol.com and paid a one time fee and have the game on a few computers. It is better than the MS version anyway, I can play faster.

Don't know either way.

Nokia was pretty dead before MS bought it. I don't blame MS for their decline. Apple and Samsung killed them. BTW, how is your Blackeberry holding up?
Their Surface tablet has seen some success,

I've seen the Surface and like it. I'd even buy one if it did not look like a cheap plastic toy. Would to well in Toys-R-us for $9.99

It gives me a hint, but it is not hard evidence.

Actually, no.

I can appreciate that, but while you may be 100% correct, it is still supposition, not fact. Yet.

I avoid Facebook, but I have heard about the ads.

I agree the probability is strong, but I have no ads on my Start Menu. I can get my email on the Yahoo page and yes, it is loaded with ads. I could not tell you what they are for as I ignore them.
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| > The devices part is all but kaput, | > given that they've managed to entirely destroy Nokia, | > which used to make 40% of all cellphones, and that | > the Windows/Metro smart phones have been a near | > total failure. | | Nokia was pretty dead before MS bought it. I don't blame MS for their | decline. Apple and Samsung killed them. BTW, how is your Blackeberry | holding up? |
I've wondered what was up with that. An MS executive took over at Nokia. I thought maybe the plan was that he'd sell out to MS. Sort of a trojan horse CEO. But I know someone who used to work there and he said the Nokia people generally wanted him. The only sensible explanation I can think of is that MS believed they could step into being a third company in a phone triopoly if they had the Nokia infrastructure, patents, etc. There's been speculation that they could have made it work if they'd immediately gone to Android and dumped Metro. I don't know. I get the sense that the whole story is not public.
I'm afraid I don't get the Blackberry joke. :) I know they're in tough shape. The connection? Personally I don't use cellphones. I have a Trachpone, paying $20/3 months, which I use as a portable phone booth and to relate to cellphone addicts who no longer even know how to answer a doorbell and expect visitors to call from the front porch instead. (!) Aside from that, I can read maps, don't use Facebook, have no interest in game diddling, and don't want to carry a tracking collar that charges me $100+/month for the privilege.
In addition to all of that, I quite enjoy the luxuries of time and space. Cellphones tend to collapse all that. Everyone and everything is imminent. I don't want to take a walk -- around the neighborhood or around a wilderness -- and have someone be able to interrupt me. I'm "out". I went out for a reason. I want to look at the trees and have some solitude. With a cellphone there's no more going "out". That feels tragic to me.
| > | > So it's mostly services. They're not mentioning | > software anymore. Microsoft used to be the biggest | > *software* company in the world, and they no longer | > advertise that as their product. Shouldn't that tell | > you something? It's not only their ads. It's also their | > official stated position to their media and shareholders. | | It gives me a hint, but it is not hard evidence. | >
You deleted the link -- one of many -- to their official statements. What constitutes evidence if not official statements? Of course they could change course if things change. But as of now they're a services company.
| > | > Microsoft started all of this back in 1998. The Active | > Desktop theme was meant to put ads on the Desktop. | > Remeber the Channel Bar? | | Actually, no. |
All OEM windows used to come with a rectangle on the Desktop, full of ads. The only one I remember was Disney. Each ad was a "channel". They called that rectangle the Channel Bar. The whole idea was ludicrous. I'm not surprised that you never noticed. It was an idea ahead of its time. Or perhaps behind its time. Bill Gates was widely celebrated as a genius at the time, for "turning the corporate ship on a dime" to adapt to the new importance of the Internet. All he really did was to blend Explorer with IE, put ads on the Desktop, and generally try to make it look like windows was online. (The "Active" part of Active Desktop was that folder windows and the Desktop itself were techinaclly actually webpages. People were invited to stick something like a Disney ad to an area of the Desktop, where one could then presumably get the latest news and ticket prices for Disney's child exploitation extravaganzas.) By the time XP came out, Active Desktop was gone and instead of making Windows look like a browser they were trying out Fischer-Price style 3-D techno- kitsch "skins". The Internet was assumed by that time. They didn't need to train people that computers and Internet went together. On the other hand, the Internet has also become more integrated, as they did with the stupendously idiotic idea of searching online when you look for a file on your computer.
| I agree the probability is strong, but I have no ads on my Start Menu.
It's something they're euphemistically calling "suggestions". Supposedly it can be disabled, but by default it will advertise various things like software that you could buy, "from time to time". I gather that means that they're going to start slow.
| I can get my email on the Yahoo page and yes, it is loaded with ads. I | could not tell you what they are for as I ignore them. |
Well, at least you don't mind companies rifling through your email to show you targetted ads, so the privacy issues with Win10 probably won't bother you overly much. :)
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On 8/2/2015 12:01 PM, Mayayana wrote:

Just that Nokia, like Blackberry ws left in the dust when new technology came along. I don't hold MS responsible for their decline, nor did they do much to help it. Technology is really a risk as it movrs so fast. Huge companies have died in the past few decades. Digital Equipment, Data General, replaced by a $900 desktop PC. Facebook killed MySpace and it may also die when a new fad comes along.

Never had a name brand PC such as from the big box stores so I must have missed it.

I can use any one of the email programs, but the web allows me access from any computer. Advertising is the price of convenience.
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On 08/02/2015 10:32 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

The Symbian platform was losing market share to Android but was still the leader until 2010. They were still ahead of iOS in 2011. The switch to Windows Phone immediately dropped them below Blackberry. Windows did recover a little ground in 2013 while Blackberry continued to slip away.
Could Symbian have retained significant market share? We'll never know.
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On Sunday, August 2, 2015 at 12:32:48 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Almost all the PCs I've had were brand names, eg Gateway, HP and I never saw a rectangle full of ads either. Some had some free software pre-loaded, eg for AOL or free AV software. Again M is full of baloney. Maybe some PCs did, but how that gets extended to all OEM PCs had a box called the "channel bar", full of ads, is just another example of the tin hat crowd.

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On 08/02/2015 10:01 AM, Mayayana wrote:

The whole plan was to sell the Windows Phone, which was not well received. Low market share means developers are reluctant to target the platform. A lack of apps further discourages purchases.
Ballmer and Elop were pushed the Nokia acquisition, and Nadella was against it. Ballmer was shown the door. Elop 'retired' in June with Nadella making the proper noises. New broom sweeps clean and Nadella wasn't shy about writing down Nokia even if it did result in a bad quarter.
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