OT: "white roofs everywhere"

Page 3 of 4  
RicodJour wrote:

Agreed that roofs like that are wonderful for energy efficiency. But aside from the obviously higher cost, I see a couple of problems- design limitations for anything other than a typical shoebox ranch, much more difficult to repair since it is harder to make the top surface walkable, and the likely show stopper of a massive dead space for things to take up residence in. Screens at the edges don't last forever. I do see a hillbilly version of that down south, and in the photos from our field offices over in the sandbox (usually applied to trailers). Plant telephone poles on either side of structure, and add a second non-connected roof a foot or three over the real roof, as a sun shade.
I think we could accomplish about as much at a lower cost, by mandating passive solar design and super-insulation on any houses built with federal loan programs.
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The screens at the edges isn't an issue unless you feel that soffit vent screening just decomposes with time. It's the same construction. As far as the walkability, it's essentially the same construction as skip sheathing on a slate, shake or tile roof. Same with metal roofing that is supported by battens. People who don't know what they are doing shouldn't be on a roof in the first place. They might fall and get hurt, or worse - damage your roof.

I agree with the many-pronged approach, but I think you might be thinking of something different when I refer to a cold roof. Slate, shakes and tile roofs should all be installed on battens anyway, so you're already halfway there. If you have a continuous air space above the insulation in the rafter bays, that's technically a cold roof.
There are already large parts of the country where concrete tile roofs are the norm. Having space under the roofing material to allow it to dry out is a big benefit for shake and slate roofs. I won't go into my thatch roofing sermon, but you should check out the insulation benefits and longevity of thatch roofs. Those old timers weren't spendthrifts and they knew how to build. A few centuries of experience tends to do that. ;)
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

--
"Distracting a politician from governing
is like distracting a bear from eating your baby."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Is your Chia House nicely landscaped with Pet Rocks or did you skimp and use the "Piece of the Berlin Wall" in a boxes?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Pet rocks. Nothin' but the best for Kasa Kurt
--
"Distracting a politician from governing
is like distracting a bear from eating your baby."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ryan P wrote:

How about a black and white checker board pattern on the roof? Perhaps that will satisfy everyone? *snicker*
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
on 5/29/2009 10:27 PM (ET) The Daring Dufas wrote the following:

Or some type of shingles, or covering panels, that could be flipped over in the different seasons. White on one side and black on the other. Similar to those flip cards that the fans use at sporting events. Maybe a white roll down cover, like a window shade? I'll think of some more stupid solutions after I have a couple of beers later. :-)
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
willshak wrote:

The roll down white shade is a good idea. It would leave a gap between it and the roof and probably help. I think I've seen something like that somewhere but I don't remember where.
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 29 May 2009 10:47:20 -0700, against all advice, something

When I hammered on a new roof, the roofer told me that I ought not go for too light of a color. He said that the shingles would not warm up properly in the sun and would fail to seal or something. I followed his advice, and selected a nice dark orange/tan.
I just had the house painted, and took the roof color into consideration when I selected a color for the house. I won't be changing the color of my roof any time soon, TYVM.
--

Don\'t worry about people stealing an idea. If it\'s original, you will
have to ram it down their throats.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My roof was white during the winter months..... Definitely cooler !
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So when the sun looks there, it thinks it sees show and decides we want it to be cold.

This will also prevent repetitive typing, although I have no idea how.
This will also prevent repetitive typing, although I have no idea how.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I don't know how I forgot this one.
I used to live on the same street (the poor section) that the owners of the two big department stores in Indianapolis lived on. Blocks and L. S. Ayres. Each had beautiful fancy homes, non-modern architecture, on wooded lots, one overlooking the White River.
One, Block I think it was, or his son built a more modern but still fancy home for his son next door. They put a brown shingled roof on it.
After about 6 months, they replaced that roof with a white shingled roof.
(I didn't really live in the poor section, except by comparison. There was no *poor* section, just middle income, where it was flat and probably had been farm land. But the Blocks and the Ayres lived in the rich section. They might have been the only families who did.)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Speaking of white, one of the astronauts from the last trip called Click and Clack this morning for advice on how to remove bolts (no kidding), and while talking, he mentioned that in haste to get back in the space shuttle, someone's helmet hit an antenna and broke off the cap.
They were able to make another cover from something they had with them, and now it works better than it had, because the new one is WHITE and it doesn't get as hot.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Oren wrote:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/earthnews/5389278/Obamas-green-guru-calls-for-white-roofs.html
Look around your neighborhood. Do you see any white roofs? Probably not.
White is not used as a roof color, even though it would be swell as a heat reflector. It's not used because it gets dirty. When it gets dirty it looks ghastly.
In Rome - and the Vatican - where they have a lot of marble statues, they have never-ending crews that come around and pressure wash the art work, removing the soot that collects from vehicle exhausts. And the not-soot that collects from the pigeons.
I'm fortunate in that the south and east sides of my house are not visible to people who keep track of ugly roofs. I've been toying with the idea of painting them white. If I do, I'll let you know the result.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

In Las Vegas, I was amazed that circa 40s - 50s roofs had white quartz rock. Any size from egg to tennis ball. Must be heavy up there or they have good lumber.
In the Mojave desert they had an good understanding of the heat, I guess.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There are lots of white roofs here. Lighter colors too.
mt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Oren wrote:

'flying wing' California moderns with shallow roofs were quite popular. No membrane roofs back then, so hot-mop all the way. Top layer was always marble chips, for weather resistance, muting sound of rain, and keeping roof cool. On a post'n'beam T&G roof back then, only insulation was a couple inches of some sort of fiber stuff, looked like thick Celotex. Not energy efficient, even by the lax standards of the day- the snow melt always gave the roofs a good workout, and skylights had to be up on a curb to keep them from leaking. There is a reason flat or near-flat roofs fell out of popularity up north- they are an upkeep nightmare.
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Euros). It stayed white most of one year. Was grey for mabee another year and a half after which it became closer to charcoal coloured. Bleaching it made it white again for, you guessed it - about another half year.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
on 5/30/2009 7:49 PM (ET) HeyBub wrote the following:

I hate to admit it, but I did a redneck thing two years ago. I have a 20 x 20 "4 Seasons" sunroom on the back of my house. The back of my house faces SW. When I had the thing built 5 years ago, I had them put a black asphalt shingle roof on it because my house roof is black. In the Summer heat, the interior of the Sunroom was about 10 to 15 degrees hotter than outside. i.e., if it was 90 F out, it was 100 inside. I don't have AC in the sunroom. I was going to have a light colored roof put on it, but I wanted to see what difference it would make in the temps before I spent 100s of $ for it. In the Spring of 2007, I went to HD and picked up a 5 gallon bucket of Henry Solarflex 287 SF White roof coating. It is not really recommended for asphalt shingles, but I was just going to test what difference the white roof would make in the interior temps. I rolled just one coat on the roof. It didn't look bad, and even if it did, it was hidden from the street. It made a hell of a difference. The temps inside the room were no higher than the outside temps, and we even left the doors between the room and house open so some AC got in there. It's still painted white. I just may leave it like that. We can't see it from the ground anyway. The roof coating is supposedly mildew resistant and it isn't dirty looking. Granted, it's colder in the room in the Winter since the Sun isn't warming the roof like it used to do. But we have a propane fireplace in there to warm it up if we are going to use the room. Holiday dinners for the extended family, etc.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
willshak wrote:

What did you have to lose? You were going to trash the black shingles anyway, so no big loss if the coating trashed them. I'd keep an eye on the roof a couple times a year, like when you are up there cleaning gutters, but unless you see them curling or otherwise self-destructing, I'd say you found a cheap work-around.
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.