OT Which direction is your ceiling fan SUPPOSED to run?

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On Sat, 05 Jul 2014 23:31:46 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

I have some moss or algae (not mold) growing on the roof and in a dark outside corner. I control it by spraying the area with dilute bleach twice per year: <http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/asktoh/question/0,,401167,00.html There are a few redwoods leaning against the deck and part of the roof. I try to make room by cutting back the roof and deck, but the trees just keep growing. The north side of the trees sometimes accumulate some moss but conveniently, that side is not in contact with the house.

I have a cot, sleeping bag, and some survival supplies in the office. However, they're not for the occasional all night writing exercises, data recovery exercises, or last minute taxes. They're for when the roads are closed due to flood, mud, or crud and I can't drive home.
Just before I bought this house, I lived with some friends in a crowded apartment building located about 20 ft from a major freeway. The traffic noise was so bad that everyone had mattresses blocking the freeway facing windows. Actually, I didn't live there as all of my stuff was in a cramped storage locker.

How was the slab in the summer? I would expect the slab floor to be cooler, especially if there were cold water pipes inside. An acquaintance built a thermal sink near his house consisting of an underground water tank containing about 500 gallons of water. The water is not for drinking (but can be used for fire suppression). Instead, it is pumped through copper and plastic pipes in the walls and floor. During the summer, it keeps the house at ground temperature. During the winter, the water is heated by his wood burner. It is then slowly pumped through the walls and floor to heat the house at night. It's not intended to heat or cool the house, but rather to moderate the temperature swings so that minimal heating and cooling will work more effectively.

I've seen wood laminate over foam board insulation (underlayment) used on slab foundations. However, I have no personal experience: <http://www.doityourself.com/forum/solid-hardwood-engineered-laminate-flooring/320138-laminate-over-rigid-foam-insulation.html Delta-FL moisture barrier, EPS foam, 3/8" OSB (oriented strand board), 3/32" underlayment foam, and laminate sandwich. The end result is allegedly better insulated than a 2" elevated sub-floor on the slab. The catch is that the slab should be perfect as wet spots (leaks and cracks) and lumps will wreck anything you put on the slab. The underside of a laminated wood floor is quite sensitive to moisture so the moisture barrier also has to be perfect.
--
Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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On Sat, 05 Jul 2014 23:23:09 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

I've spent 3 or 4 months of my life in Manhattan, and that's enough.
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Agreed, I love the forested setting.

We bought our property about 25 years ago. We're about 10 miles out of town, up on a mountain, and was surrounded by thick forest everywhere. The county road ends a half mile past our place. We really felt like we were getting away from it all to enjoy nature, our privacy, and peace and quiet.
Over the years the developers moved in, and immediately logged off most of the forest.
Now we are surrounded by private gated estates with 4000-5000 sq/ft mini- mansions. Despite having 5 acres to build on, they built one right across the road that sits up on a hill overlooking our property. It's less than 150 feet from our house. Yay... So much for privacy. To make matters worse, their landscapers show up every Friday with multiple mowers and leaf blowers. :)
We used to have beat up pickup trucks and the occasional weekend partiers driving up and down our road. Now it's mostly BMW's and Mercedes.
I miss the remote feel we used to have. We have tried to keep as much of the forest on our own property as possible, but with less than two acres there's only so much we can do.
Such is "progress"...
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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On Sat, 05 Jul 2014 22:05:08 -0700, John Larkin

there was the iApx432 launch (three days). That was *way* more than enough. SF was much better (parking was the same - nonexistent). The hookers a couple of blocks from the hotel were funny, far better than those in Manhattan (even the trannies).
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wrote:

You might want to string some copper wire across the roof. They also make copper and zinc strips for the purpose.

I don't like any growth in contact with the house. Any wind and there's more work to do. It's good to keep the exterior dry, too.

Sounds like a regular occurrence. Ugh.

Like the Winter, it worked fine for a month or two into the season. Late in the season it got to be the wrong temperature and would work against the heat pump. Most people have this mistaken idea that only a few feet down the ground is a constant temperature - not true. Just notice the position of the mixing valve when you take a shower, during Summer and Winter.

Yes, a foam board probably would have made all the difference. Much of the downstairs of our house was tile or bamboo flooring, with the master BR carpeted, directly on the slab. All of the floors were noticeably warmer/colder than the upstairs floor.
I'm leery about putting anything over concrete (whether floor or wall), for exactly the reasons you state. Concrete is porous and moisture *will* come through. I really don't want to stop it on the inside. My current basement has an unfinished basement and I'm not sure what to do on the floor. I'm only planning on using it for a shop and storage but I want to sheetrock the walls, at least, if not put in a ceiling (though may not for tax reasons). Most of it is carpeted now, which I'm tearing up (sawdust in carpeting is a PITA). The problem is that the floor is dusting. Not sure how to handle it.
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I remember a story about a Canadian Mounty knowing his man, responsible for murder robbery, mayhem, etc, was one of two inside a saloon. But did not know which man. He went in, severely kicked a dog lying near the bar, as the dog yelped loudly and one of the two came to the dog's aid with "poor puppy, etc" the Mounty arrested that man, and had the correct man.
Plus, Lizzie Borden gave her money to an animal shelter,
go figure.
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On Sun, 06 Jul 2014 07:33:50 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

The iApx432 event must have been a hoot. Ditto Itanic. What I don't understand is how Intel introduced those architectures (super CISC and then super RISC) and somehow managed to make them slower than x86. There's got to be stories.
SF was much better (parking was the same - nonexistent). The

NYC is all concrete and steel and steam. Central Park is much praised but still awfully civilized.
SF has a small downtown, like a bit of New York, which is what most visitors see. But it has views, trails, stairways, beaches, cliffs, tunnels, mountains (well one, almost) if you get a couple of miles from downtown. We passed Proposition M some years back, which established height limits that keeps downdown from spreading. I park on the street at home, no problem.
You've got to be a people-person to enjoy New York. You have to actually own two or three tuxedos. Hang out in art museums.
We get the Sunday New York Times. It doesn't have comics, but it does have Style and The Arts, which are even funnier.
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On Sun, 06 Jul 2014 07:52:48 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Zinc doesn't work at all. Cooper only works for about 2-3 ft downhill. "Copper / Zinc Strips Failure - Roof Life of Oregon" <
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v
b-uZW9tJg>
One of my experiments was to rapidly electroplate some copper onto a cathode, producing copper dust. I sprinkled it onto the moss and added some mildly acidic water. The most was mostly gone by the next day. I hosed off the residue, and in about a month later, the moss was back. Grrr. Diluted sodium hypochlorite bleach (Clorox) and a little TSP replacement degreaser in a garden sprayer works well enough for me, or just use the overpriced commercial stuff: <http://www.30seconds.net or make your own concoction: <http://savagesisters.wordpress.com/2009/02/02/make-your-own-outdoor-cleaner/

Not really. Once a year at most for road closures. Maybe 4 times per year when my car won't run, or I'm stuck with doing the computer work after midnight. I don't use the cot much because there's no room in my cluttered office. I just roll an inflatable mattress into the isle and use a sleeping bag.
There's only one road in and out of the San Lorenzo Valley. Drop a tree across it and everything comes to a screeching halt. Actually, the tree isn't the problem, it's the safety regulations. It used to be that when a tree falls across the power lines, PG&E, Ma Bell, Comcast, Davey Tree, Public Works, and the local fire department all arrive at once and work together. Lots of congestion, but the tree was usually cleared in a very short time. The problem is that it's not really very safe to have everyone working at the same time. So, it was decreed that parallel processing was out, and serial processing was better. Everyone stands around directing traffic until PG&E declares the power to be turned off and safe. Then, the tree and debris are removed by Davey Tree. Then the various utilities replace the lines. Public works clears the road and declares the road passable. Finally, the fire department opens the road to traffic. Using parallel processing, a tree fall could be cleared in about an hour or two. With the new improved method, I've timed the process at between 6 to 8 hours.

I know little about heat pumps. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geothermal_heat_pump> "Seasonal variations drop off with depth and disappear below 7 metres (23 ft) to 12 metres (39 ft)" That's more than a "few feed down". How deep did you go?

Part of my foundation is concrete and rebar filled speedblock, which is certainly porous. I used: <http://www.thompsonswaterseal.com/waterproofing-products/multisurface-waterproofers/waterproofer-plus-masonry-protector and some long forgotten brand of vapor barrier on the outside. Something similar should work for a slab: <http://www.concretenetwork.com/vapor-barriers/ <http://www.concretenetwork.com/vapor-barriers/types.html

Well, that's the standard practice. If your water table is too high, something else will need to be done. I have zero experience with such slabs and can't offer any suggestions.

Dunno. Maybe just an overlay to seal it better? Again, I have zero experience with slabs: <http://www.concretenetwork.com/concrete-overlays/

What type of dust? Carpet dust? Concrete dust? Rubber pad dust?
--
Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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On Sunday, July 6, 2014 2:49:56 PM UTC-4, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

In the video, he says it's copper, but it sure looks like zinc to me. No copper color that I see. And I can show you roofs here where it's obvious zinc works, just like whatever it is in that video. You can see it with zinc flashing on pipes coming out of roofs. For about 4 ft below there is no moss/algae. But I agree it's far from an ideal solution, you'd have to put strips every 4 ft.
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On Sun, 06 Jul 2014 10:47:09 -0400, Arnie Goetchius

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wrote:

"ex spurt" or sales critter? A lot of sales critters act as if "expert" to upsell to higher margin products.
?-)
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wrote:

Up here, generally, if it is hot enough to need AC it is too humid for a "swamp cooler". Most of the time just reducing the humidity a bit makes it bearable - but when it's hot AND humid, we run the AC.
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In some really important ways, you are missing big items. Most of the cold coils heat transport is from condensation energy, there is no equivalent heat of evaporation on the hot side so it all goes into temperature rise (sensible heat). Unless of course it is built very like conventional AC and the heat is exhausted outside.
?-)
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On 7/6/2014 10:13 PM, josephkk wrote:

Not sure what you mean by "you are missing big items". I think you just agreed with me 100%. The cold coil does not cool the air as much as the hot coil warms the air. All of the heat of condensation ends up warming the air in the room. I guess I didn't explain it clearly.
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Rick

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On 7/7/2014 6:53 PM, rickman wrote:

Try this: Dehumidifier contains an electric motor which gives off heat when it runs. The cooling and condensing are equal, so they can be ignored. Check the wattage used, and that's the added (electric) heat.
--
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Christopher A. Young
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On 7/7/2014 7:06 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

That is incorrect. The hot and cold coils provide the same amount of cooling or heating other than the inefficiencies, but the cooling does not all go into making the air cool. The water condensing puts heat into the coil without changing temperature. This heat at the warm coil *does* fully go to heating the air.
Look up heat of condensation or evaporation. Same with freezing/melting. Heat flows, but temperature does not change.
--

Rick

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On Monday, July 7, 2014 7:18:19 PM UTC-4, rickman wrote:

Except of course that it all balances out again when the air mixes. The drier warmend air that comes out of the dehumidifier quickly mixes with the rest of the air, which still has higher humidity. That slightly warmer and drier air then transfers it's energy to the rest of volume of air in the room/house, heating the air and water in it, until equilibrium is attained again.
And back to the original claim, that a dehumidifier is like running the AC and heat at the same time, it's not. That's because when you do that, you're pumping heat out of the house, then running heat, ie electric, gas, whatever, to replace the energy you just pumped needlessly outside. A dehumdifier avoids that.
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On Monday, July 7, 2014 7:06:55 PM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

And he's conflating heat with temperature.
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On 7/8/2014 8:45 AM, trader_4 wrote:

I'm gobsmacked! Your barmy use of "conflate"!
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Christopher A. Young
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On Sun, 06 Jul 2014 09:10:25 -0700, John Larkin

big question of the day was "Huh?". That question was never answered. ...even decades later. Intel is a one-trick pony. Always has been.

Civilized? Is that why it's so dangerous?

You do know that there are a *lot* of single-family homes in NYC, too? Manhattan <> NYC.

No, you have to hate people.

The editorial page is even funnier.
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