OT Which direction is your ceiling fan SUPPOSED to run?

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We're scraping bottom on my knowledge of construction practices. Other than falling off a tile roof, I've never build or specified one. I think the article refers to tile coatings, not the actual tile itself.
Googling for cool red tile coatings: <http://www.americanrooftilecoatings.com/cool-colors.html Looks like you can get IR reflective roof tiles in any color EXCEPT red. Maybe they mean terra cotta which is kinda red and has the highest IR reflectivity? Oh wait, you can get the coating in cool red (also known as Thai Pepper): <http://www.americanrooftilecoatings.com/color-palette.html

Yep. That all makes sense. Looking at the definitions for SR and SRI, there are multiple factors (refection, absorption, emission, roof slope, etc) involved in calculating the indexes. Nothing is simple.
I found some detail on the difference between SR (solar reflectance) and SRI (solar reflectance index). <http://www.deansteelbuildings.com/products/panels/sr-sri-by-color/ <http://energy.lbl.gov/coolroof/ref_01.htm (note the assumptions). More: <http://energy.lbl.gov/coolroof/tile.htm
--
Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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On Sat, 05 Jul 2014 18:25:01 -0400, Stormin Mormon

You have more on the ball than some folks give you credit for.
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On 7/5/2014 7:14 PM, DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno wrote:

http://images.fineartamerica.com/images-medium-large/little-landseer-puppy-with-soccer-ball-portrait-waldemar-dabrowski.jpg
--
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Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
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I was ready to say Democratic, but that would presume they have or even care about culture.
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On Sat, 05 Jul 2014 07:41:22 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Actually, I just got back into town for vacation. It's fun laughing at all the lefties, knowing that they're not getting any (well not much) more of my taxes.

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wrote:

Yes, quite nice. Do you have problems with mold/mildew because of the trees in such close proximity?

Larkin? Never. SF is too much of a dump. He's more likely to have a Google bus parked in his driveway while they pick up the illegal programmers next door. ;-)

I didn't like a slab floor of the Alabama house. Too cold on the feet. Even in the South, the slab made it cold in the Winter and I had to crank up the thermostat as the Winter went on (and the ground cooled).
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On Sat, 05 Jul 2014 08:40:58 -0400, Stormin Mormon

You are entitled to the opinion. I'm just giving you my opinion that it makes you look tike a totally unballanced fool.
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On Sat, 5 Jul 2014 16:09:53 +0000 (UTC), HerHusband

temperature too. And with the 6 workstations on the high step being so much higher than the 11 on the bottom floor, the fan keeps them a lot cooler without freezing the butts of the the other 11.(and cuts the run time of the AC significantly)
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On Sat, 05 Jul 2014 10:05:40 -0700, John Larkin

truss roof on top of it - solve the leak and heat problems in one fell swoop. Perssonally, I would NEVER own a building with a flat roof.
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Goodbye
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On 7/5/2014 10:25 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That is *not* what you said. You said...
> As for the de-humidifier producing heat - it only produced a fraction of it's total power consumption as heat output. The heat coming off the back of the unit is just heat removed from the air (and moisture) entering the front of the unit.
Actually I'm not sure what this is saying, but it when you used the word "fraction" it seems to imply that there is little heat produced in the room. The opposite is true. Drawing say 200 watts from the outlet will warm the room by several times that amount. The difference is the latent heat of evaporation from the moisture when liquified being returned to the room at the hot coil. So a dehumidifier is much like running the AC and a heater to remove the moisture. You heat the room by more than the power drawn from the outlet which in turn makes the AC run longer to remove that heat.
When my house is not dry enough I turn the thermostat down another degree or two. The AC runs a little longer removing more moisture and a happy comfort level is achieved with a balance between being dry and being cool. I'm looking for comfort, not a fixed temperature. Once the air is wrung out I can turn the thermostat up again if I want. Much easier than dealing with extra equipment and likely more cost effective to boot. An AC is a great dehumidifier.
--

Rick

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On Sunday, July 6, 2014 4:34:04 AM UTC-4, rickman wrote:

Ridiculous. To do so would require energy to be mysteriously created, which of course it's not. Assume the room is perfectly insulated. If 200W is all that's going into the room, then that is all the heat that is being created. Physics says so.
The difference is the

It's not much like running the heater and the AC at the same time at all. As has been explained to you about 5 times now, when you run the AC, you're pumping heat from inside the house to the OUTSIDE. Then, to replace that heat and keep the temperature of the house from dropping, you're proposing to run the HEAT. Whether that heat is gas, oil, electric, etc, it's being used to REPLACE heat that you just pumped outside. It's very inefficient compared to running a dehumidifier. With a dehumidifier, you're not pumping heat outside the house.

If by turning the thermostat back up again, you mean just raising the set point for cooling, so that the AC goes off, then I agree it's what normal people would do, it's cost effective, and fast. It's what I said many posts ago I'd do if my house was 78 and too humid. However that is very different from what you claimed, which was that turning on the AC AND THE HEAT is exactly the same as running a dehumidifier. It's not, because, one more time, by doing that, you're pumping heat out of the house, then using the heat system to replace it. A very inefficient process compared to a dehumidifier.
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On Sat, 05 Jul 2014 18:22:46 -0400, Stormin Mormon

drew 200 watts (1.8 amps running) (just checked) That's less than the heat from my office lights (before I switched to LED lights)
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On Sat, 05 Jul 2014 19:53:36 -0400, Arnie Goetchius

than you, if she's anything like mine
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

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On Sat, 05 Jul 2014 20:20:04 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

I live in Glen Park, an obscure quiet neighborhood, with a small village down the hill with a few good restaurants and a dynamite bakery. Glen Canyon is two blocks away, with a stream and raccoons and coyotes and hawks and stuff. There are googlites moving in here and there. Nice people, but they are driving up house prices.
San Francisco is a collection of villages, mostly separated by geographic features. Different parts are very different.
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/53724080/SF/Glen_Park/Ohlone_Way_1.jpg
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/53724080/SF/Glen_Park/Penny_Lane_2.jpg
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/53724080/SF/Glen_Canyon_Trail.jpg
Not exactly Fishermen's Wharf.
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On Sat, 05 Jul 2014 22:23:28 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That's near universal in San Francisco, and I have no idea why. In my experience, they leak about as often as pitched roofs.
They are fun to walk on. I could walk my entire block on my neighbors' roofs.
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On Sat, 05 Jul 2014 20:20:04 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Mold was once a big problem for me. When I bought the house, I discovered that the roof leaked. I patched it as best as I could, but standing water on a flat roof is never a good idea. The heat from the wood burner would evaporate the water that leaked into the carpet, raising the indoor humidity. The water condensed on various surfaces promoting mold growth. I knew what it was like to live in a terrarium.
In 1995, I did some remodeling which included replacing the flat roof with a 1:12 not-so-flat roof. That and re-roofing mostly eliminated the leaks. I then emptied half the house at a time, and went on a mold hunt. Unfortunately, some of my old books were lost during the mold purge. My built in mold detector (runny nose) signaled success.
The one remaining mold factory is the shower. It's a primitive all sheet metal affaire, with some rust around the edges. The rust seems to attract mold, especially behind the shower curtains. I use bleach to remove the mold when it becomes visible, but will eventually replace the shower with something more modern.
Other than these, there is no mold anywhere else in the house. That's one of the side benefits of a drafty house. Where there's air flow, there's no mold. That's why mold accumulated on surfaces behind furniture and curtains, where there's no air flow.

I was referring to his vacation getaway. All the houses in my neighborhood were once vacation homes and not intended for winter occupancy. Incidentally, I program Motorola radios on the side, which I guess makes me an "illegal programmer".

I think he was referring to his office building, which would have a slab foundation and floor, like all commercial buildings. If you were rolling around your house with a loaded fork lift, you might appreciate the merits of a slab floor somewhat more.
Thermal conductivity of concrete is about 1 W/m-K while kiln dried wood is roughly 0.1 W/m-K (varies with moisture content). <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_thermal_conductivities>
--
Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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On Sat, 05 Jul 2014 20:00:13 -0700, John Larkin

http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/city-guides/new-york-photos-2/#/nyc-centralpark-quiet_2357_600x450.jpg
http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/city-guides/new-york-photos-2/#/nyc-fresh-air_2360_600x450.jpg
http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/city-guides/new-york-photos-2/#/nyc-belvedere-castle_2355_600x450.jpg
Not exactly Harlem...

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wrote:

That's bad. Really bad. I was referring to outside, though. Trees that close to frame buildings aren't a good idea. I had problems with moss on my driveway in Alabama. ...and that was a completely open area. The only trees on the lot were a few Crepe Myrtles (the bushy type) and a 10' Cherry that I'd just planted. The problem was on the North side of the house, though.

Nah, you're not crammed fourteen to a house and shuttled back and forth from the dorm to work.

Sure, but you were mentioning temperature being an advantage. I didn't find it so, at least for a smaller building. Perhaps a large building (more constant sub-slab temperature) would be different.

Yes, you can feel the difference with your feet. ...and it's rare to use wood as insulation.
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