OT Which direction is your ceiling fan SUPPOSED to run?

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Problem with authority? Maybe, but it was a LEARNED response.
Actually, I was trying to confirm whether others experienced what I had found empirically, and was in direct opposition to the 'experts' suggestion. Plus, convince Ms. Macy that I am NOT an idiot and delusional for thinking I know more than the experts on these House shows.
The recommendation has nothing to do with your

I thought that way too, directly blowing down onto me in hot weather 'sounded' better. But just confirmed that blowing down on me ended up 'feeling' a good 5 degrees hotter, than letting air come in from the sides. I now have the fan set for UP and it feels cooler in the room than with NO fan. And earlier it definitely felt hotter with the fan blowing DOWN, by several degrees above what it was like with NO fam.

At University I had a roomate who during the summer would go logging for piece meal wages to make great money. He said they roasted all day, like into the 80's, 90's, and froze at night in their cabins. Wake up in the morning to find a sheet of ice frozen over standing water in any dish! Now THAT's cold. He said the money was worth it, though.
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On 7/3/2014 9:19 PM, RobertMacy wrote:

I can't explain that and it is in direct opposition to what I have observed. With the fan blowing down gently I feel the breeze and it helps. I never felt like the air was a warm wind. With the fan blowing up I don't feel anything, but then my ceiling may be higher than yours, it is a cathedral ceiling. I do use it for dispersing the stuff that triggers the smoke detector. If you like your toast dark it goes off. Turn on the fan and in a minute it goes off.

Money is money. I am barely willing to do regular work these days. Once you get some how much do you need?
--

Rick

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On Thursday, July 3, 2014 10:43:06 PM UTC-4, rickman wrote:

+1
The effect I've noticed is exactly what you describe. I have mine set to blow down. I only use them in the summer. I feel breeze, which has a cooling effect. I don't notice that the air is hotter.
With it set to go up, I don't notice much of anything. I'm also not buying the theory that in winter it should go the other way and it;s going to be a good thing. If you leave air alone, I would think you'd get some boundarly layer effect, where the air meets the surfaces. By disrupting that, I would think you could have more energy loss, just like air blowing past a radiator transfers more heat.
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story. But still better than 39C and 90+% humidity in Livingstone in October!!!
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I just took a look on my Davis weather station console. 32% indoor, 43% outdoor humidity. This week end Stampede starts, hope we have good, dry weather next 10 days.
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I didn't think to see if the manual for these fans says anything about air direction. Great, trip over those damn little manuals [one for each fan] for a year, now can't find a single one!
aha! distance to the ceiling making a difference, hmmmm, 10 ft ceilings so the fan has the luxury of being down a bit from the ceiling.
assume 'v' mean down?
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Robert Macy wrote: "- show quoted text -
aha! distance to the ceiling making a difference, hmmmm, 10 ft ceilings so the fan has the luxury of being down a bit from the ceiling.
assume 'v' mean down? "
That's what I said! :)
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wow, sounds neat!
just got done with a 'side by side' comparison; DOWN is HOTTER than no fan! even though the air hits you more directly just seems to become hot air. UP is COOLER than no fan! keep getting cold drafts from every side. well 'cool' drafts.
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wrote:

True, a bit leaky into the rest of the house and a lot of thermal storage out there in the form of a few thousand sq ft of travertine stones.
This is 2008 construction in AZ custom built for an owner, walls are like R-22, or such and ceilings are like R-30+ or such.
Ceiling exhaust fan !!! when it's 105 outside no way!!! you want me to suck in outside air at those temps??!!
Let's see at night 81 during day 105, making the average high side of 93, sounds about right.
Since I painted my house a darker color and take advanatage of 'night time radiation' the average in our house has dropped substantially. Who would have thought? dark house = cooler average, light colored house = hotter average. but true we noticed a difference the moment the house was painted.
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wrote:

off your skin. Add in evaporative cooling and a breeze is a big win, at least in small rooms, like a home.
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On Thu, 03 Jul 2014 16:50:22 -0700, RobertMacy

Ours have pull-chains for both switches (even though all but one have two wall switches, and that one has two switches but only one is connected for some reason).
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On Thu, 03 Jul 2014 18:29:46 -0700, RobertMacy

AC up 4 degrees C without people complaining of heat, and the "upper deck" area is now cool instead of toasty. (about 1/3 of the "theatre" is about 16" higher (floor) than the rest - with level ceiling. Originally was 3 levels, 1/3 low, 1/3 up one step, and 1/3 up another step. A few of the girls should wear more clothes - they complain their legs get cold.
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wrote:

outside this morning, and 25-ish later in the day -likely 45%. Not nearly as hot and humid as earlier in the week.
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On Thu, 03 Jul 2014 22:44:44 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

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system designed for? UP or

move the air up in the summer so you aren't blasting yourself with warm air, move the air down in the winter to push the warm air down where you live.
I think a lot of this has to do with how tall your ceilings are, and your specific temperature differentials.
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On Thu, 03 Jul 2014 18:40:06 -0700, RobertMacy

I thought it gets kinda cold at night in Az. I've only been there once. It was quite hot during the day, but we nearly froze sleeping in the car at night.

In some areas, white rocks and white roofs are required by code to reduce air conditioning requirements. It's suppose to reflect the sunlight instead of absorbing it. Now, you're telling me that the collective wisdom of the local planning department might be wrong? Are you sure?
--
Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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On 7/4/2014 12:28 AM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

I initially thought he was wrong, but consider the two situations. In the day the house is absorbing sunlight radiated from the Sun at many thousands of degrees. At night the house is radiating heat into the void at around -273°C. I'd say the more significant factor is the daylight situation, but the devil is in the details and I would love to see some real data on the situation.
--

Rick

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On Friday, July 4, 2014 4:11:00 AM UTC-4, rickman wrote:

There is a study that was done in Florida on identical houses where they measured temps and energy usage with a variety of roofs. Between white shingled roofs and black it resulted in something like a 10% savings in AC energy at the peak in summer, with the houses unoccupied. When houses were occupied, that savings got cut in half. The reason I would suspect is that with the houses occupied, a lot more AC is used, so while the savings amount is about the same, the percentage is going to be less, because the overall usage number is higher.
From which I concluded, it doesn't make much difference, at least for me. I'm in NJ and the study was in FL, where the temps are much higher over a much longer period. To make a roof choice color based on saving $15 a year didn't make any sense to me.
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On Thu, 03 Jul 2014 22:28:23 -0400, krw wrote:

We have air conditioning which keeps the house at 78, and a way undersized room dehumidifier which we set up in the master shower, turn on the circulating fan in the furnace, and basically slowly and inefficiently dry out the whole house.
It makes a huge huge difference how hot it feels -- and we're in Oregon, where everyone is a humidity wimp.
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Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
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On 7/4/2014 12:57 AM, Tim Wescott wrote:

Do you realize the dehumidifier is just an AC unit where the heat is exhausted back into the room? You could do the same thing by running a small space heater which would make the AC run more often which does a much better job of taking the humidity out of the air. Actually, I've never seen a house with AC that still had high humidity, but then I'm not in the Pacific northwest.
--

Rick

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