OT Which direction is your ceiling fan SUPPOSED to run?

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It's HOT, so I thought run the ceiling fan so the cool air comes across the stone flooring and moves by me to be sucked up into the ceiling fan - so I feel cooler. Fan is set to move air UP
Earlier I thought run the fan directly onto me gently moving air straight at me, which is DOWN. But when I did that, after 10-15min felt hotter in the room.
Just saw one of those home shows, says in winter run the fan to move air UP so the hot air moves along the ceiling and down your walls. And, in the summer run your fan DOWN, with NO explanation, except claiming that lowers your temperature 4-5 degrees [which is impossible in a CLOSED system] and save up to 40% on air conditioning [what planet do THEY live on?]
So my question is WHICH way is this !@#$#@ system designed for? UP or DOWN air in the summer?
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system designed for? UP or DOWN

it depends if you have air conditioning.
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On Thu, 03 Jul 2014 16:27:29 -0700, RobertMacy

I run UP all seasons.... moves the air within putting myself in a wind.          ...Jim Thompson
--
| James E.Thompson | mens |
| Analog Innovations | et |
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Jim Thompson wrote:

Yup. Same here.
--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
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wrote:

again which way? for what reason? elaborate?
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On Thu, 03 Jul 2014 16:32:58 -0700, Jim Thompson

EXACTLY! In the summer cooler, in the winter the hot ceiling air does get a chance to slide down the cooler external wall, heating them a bit. ...I'm going to go change them all back. Experts! phewey!
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On 04/07/14 07:38, RobertMacy wrote:

The idea of a direct draft downwards is to make you feel cooler due to the evaporation of your perspiration, why not make up your own mind and use whatever feels the best.
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On Thu, 03 Jul 2014 16:27:29 -0700, RobertMacy

Mine doesn't reverse, it always blows down. I don't think the blades can be switched.
We don't have a/c, so the only time we use the fan is when it's warm at night. Works great.
--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com
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The instructions for my Hunter suggest blowing v(down arrow) in winter, to keep heat closer to occupants, and ^ in summer, to lift heat up. Those instructions are for a 12" or longer shaft betweem the ceiling and the motor turning the blades.
For my fan - a flush 'ceiling hugger' - instructions are to run v in summer, since there is insufficient clearance for fan to create updraft.
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On Thu, 03 Jul 2014 16:39:33 -0700, John Larkin

AZ housing is noted for these fans. We have eight laced throughout the house. Three speed settings, two chains, one for fan one for light, and always two switches on the walls for each fan, and a 'direction switch' on the side of the housing, requires a ladder to get to that is very intelligently mnemonic, slide up air moves UP, slide down air moves DOWN. noiseless critters, too.
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THANKS, again empirical evidence opposite the 'experts'!
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On 7/3/2014 7:53 PM, RobertMacy wrote:

Wow, you seem to have a problem with authority. Of course you can use the fan anyway you wish. The recommendation has nothing to do with your house, it has to do with your skin. As others have pointed out when it is warm a slight breeze can feel good, so the fan is set to blow down so you can feel it. In the winter when it is cool you don't want to feel the breeze, so set it to up. By the time the circulation reaches you it is greatly dispersed and you don't feel the cool air so much.
My bed is right under a window and I tried adding a plastic film to seal off the draft. But that only worked so well. I tried adding some cardboard as layers of insulation behind the blind and still felt a cold draft. Turns out I was reducing the heat flow through the window, but that was not the full problem. The air by the window would still get cold, but since it got cold slowly it fell slowly still lowering temperature significantly by the time it fell on my bed. It took a 3/4 inch sheet of Styrofoam tightly fitted to the window before I could sleep in that bed. This was a cold winter here and that draft was unbearable! It only takes a very little air flow to create a very noticeable draft in the winter because the air can be rather cold. That is why you want the fan blowing up if at all in the winter. I turn mine off in the winter. I don't think it changes the electric bill noticeably one way or the other or the comfort in the room.
--

Rick

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On 7/3/2014 7:53 PM, RobertMacy wrote:

Consulting the works of Aristotle, Confucious, and Ann Landers..... provides a variety of data.
Try one, try the other. Do what works for you.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
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system designed for? UP or

heat rises. If you have ac, you want to push the warm air down so it can become ac'd. If you don't have ac, you might as well leave the warm air up there were it will be less noticed.
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On Thu, 03 Jul 2014 16:50:22 -0700, RobertMacy

Mine cost $40 at Home Depot and doesn't have all those fancy features; 3 speeds, no light, no direction. It is quiet. In our climate, we probably use it 5 or 10 nights per year, for the rare heat wave.
Ceiling fans are impressive. They seem to last forever.
I did tie it into the ceiling real good. Nothing wrecks your sleep like a fan falling on you.
--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc

jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com
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Hi, Sounds like you have an experience with falling ceiling fan on you? I have 3 of them fancy ones on top floor of the house. Very seldom use them. Today it is VERY hot(for us at least), 30.7C in my front yard. 30C temp. here is not usual. Rather -30C is usual in winter, LOL!
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On 7/3/2014 8:42 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

30°C doesn't sound so bad to me. I like the 30°C days. It is the 33°C days like we've been having when it starts to be a bother. This weekend should be nice though. High around 30°C, low around 14°C at night. Nice sleeping weather.
--

Rick

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On Thu, 03 Jul 2014 17:11:23 -0700, John Larkin

These fans are probably a bit more.
you just reminded me that UP air is going to turn the fan into a chopper if accidently raise up into it!
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Went there, waited ...and waited ...and waited, forgot what it was all about, couldn't read the tiny little words, so gave up cursing and swearing under my breath to return here ready to lambaste your reply when upon rereading, realized what that image was! then, LOL!
Plus, the images had an unusual coordinate system for showing those spatial diagrams. Had you not shown me those images, I NEVER would have thought of using that type of presentation to potential clients for showing accuracy of our proposed position-location system in that simple manner, THANKS! See, there's a reason for everything!
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On Thu, 03 Jul 2014 16:38:12 -0700, RobertMacy

The theory is to move the hot air from the ceiling down to the living space in the winter. Depending the use of the space, summer may require up or down. If air conditioned you can get away with keeping temps at least 4 degrees warmer if you keep the fan running down because the light breeze helps cool. Running the fan UP draws the cool air from the floor up to the ceiling and circulates the air across the ceiling to spill down the walls. Doesn't work as well with "architectural" ceilings.
I just put 2 70 inch fans in the office - 6 speed - running down on 4th speed -13 and 15 foot ceilings with architectural features - (former theatre)
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