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[brain explodes] FFS go metric.
--
My childbirth instructor says it's not pain I'll feel during labour, but pressure. Is she right?
Yes, in the same way that a tornado might be called an air current.
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On Sunday, March 13, 2016 at 7:02:37 PM UTC-4, Mr Macaw wrote:

Half the size of the property on which my house is located.

The largest size container of milk sold in the grocery store is 1 gallon. Nobody cares about 7 gallon drums.

18 or 19, depending on how it's packed when you measure it in a standard measuring cup. Not that any home cook very often uses more than 4 cups of flour, or maybe 8 for a big batch of bread.

About 10 times a typical recipe of most things. Or a great deal of gravy, which requires only a couple of tablespoons of flour, depending on how much dripping you have to go with it. Cindy Hamilton
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On 03/14/2016 02:31 PM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:

There's a pond on my land, that covers about 2 acres (3 now since we've just had a lot of rain). So, usually an acre is about half that pond. That's close enough.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us/
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On 03/13/2016 04:44 PM, Mr Macaw wrote:
[snip]

The basic unit of time is the second. For smaller amounts of time they use metric prefixes.
I sometimes think of what it would like to use metric prefixes for larger units, like kiloseconds.
After 86.4 kiloseconds you run into the day, a natural period of time that doesn't fit into this metric stuff. Reality gets in the way.
How about forgetting about seconds, and use days. Then you have the milliday, (which is still longer than a minute). A microday would be the period of time we used to call 86.6ms (milliseconds).
BTW, in our system the average year is 365.2425 days long. Unexpectedly, that IS a whole number of seconds. There are 31,556,736 seconds in the average year. That's about 31.5 megaseconds per year.
1 gigasecond is approx. 31.69 years. 1 terasecond is approx. 31.69 millennia.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us/
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On Sunday, March 13, 2016 at 11:08:56 PM UTC-4, Mark Lloyd wrote:

Here's an interesting article on how Excel stores dates and times. If anyone ever asks why Excel includes Feb 29, 1900 even though 1900 was not a leap year, you'll be able to tell them that it is not a bug. It is by design.
http://www.cpearson.com/excel/datetime.htm

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On 03/13/2016 10:26 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
[snip]

I like to read about those things sometimes. Thanks for the link.
[snip]
Also, I didn't expect to see many problems with Y2K, as with Y2.038K.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us/
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On 03/14/2016 04:34 PM, Mark Lloyd wrote:

I did some patching in the months leading up to Y2K but there really wasn't that much. I was on call New Year's Eve but it passed uneventfully. Luckily someone other than myself will have to worry about Y2038.
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On 3/14/2016 8:02 PM, rbowman wrote:

I saw "19A0" in one case. Caught me completely off guard ("Where the hell did that 'A' come from??"). But, thinking about it for a few microseconds and it was obvious...
I now keep dates as ascii strings. It's not that much more work.
The tougher problem (and it will NOT be solved, here! :> ) is thinking about temporal "REFERENCES"!
E.g., if I have an appointment "in 35 minutes" and I *bind* that to the current time (it is roughly 8:40P here), then that would suggest the appointment is at 9:15P. Assume I also have something scheduled for 10:00P.
Now, if I adjust my local clock to make "now" be 8:45P, how does that affect these two events? Is my appointment still 35 minutes in the future? And, the 10:00 event 5 minutes sooner than it would have been had I not updated my clock?
What if I then set my clock *back* 5 minutes? Has anything changed??
Silly example. But, think about things that are days or weeks hence. How do you "store" those times? And, how does your choice of storage technique (e.g., early or late binding) affect when they ACTUALLY occur?
Do you store "relative times" using a relative notation? And, store the reference from which they were originally specified? Or, convert everything to absolute times?
Do you convert absolute times to relative times and store the reference?
I.e., when a person says "I have an appointment in 35 minutes", does that really mean they will wait for the minute hand to make 35 complete revolutions before the appointment begins? Or, have they done some mental arithmetic and decided to express the ABSOLUTE time of the appointment in relative terms (for the benefit of whomever they are conversing with)?
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On 03/14/2016 10:44 PM, Don Y wrote:
[snip]

That stuff reminded my of my grandmother cooking biscuits. She wanted to leave them in the oven for 10 minutes, and seemed to have a problem with keeping track of that. Keep looking at the clock ans saying "how long has it been...".
I suggested that (when putting the biscuits in) look at the clock NOW and figure out what time it will be 10 minutes from now. Then it's easy to check for that.
Some people will not allow things to be easy.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us/
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On 3/15/2016 2:47 PM, Mark Lloyd wrote:

Growing up, we had pasta at least once a week. (short) mother kept it on the top shelf -- and always had to ask me to get it down for her.
"Sheesh! Why don't you just LEAVE IT ON THE COUNTER, we eat it often enough?!!"
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On 03/13/2016 12:22 PM, Mr Macaw wrote:

Octothorpe.
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That's the official name, but I've never heard anyone actually use it in everyday language.
--
HELP WANTED:
Baiters. Local fishing boats need 4 baiters to bate hooks for tourists. Must have strong hands and work hard. Good pay-$15 per hour, and benefits.
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On 03/13/2016 03:45 PM, Mr Macaw wrote:

0x23 ascii. Programmers get a little strange in their everyday language.
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The last four words in your sentence were unnecessary.
--
A man walks into a bar with a slab of asphalt under his arm and says, "A beer please, and one for the road."

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On Sunday, March 13, 2016 at 7:25:52 PM UTC-5, Mr Macaw wrote:

...your being here is unnecessary.
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PKB.
--
PNEUMONOULTRAMICROSCOPICSILICOVOLCANOCONIOSIS (45 letters, a lung disease caused by breathing in particles of siliceous volcanic dust) is the longest word in the English language, beating TETRAMETHYLDIAMINOBENZHYDRYLPHOSPHINOUS ACID, HEPATICOCHOLANGIOCHOLECYSTENTEROSTOMIES, FORMALDEHYDETETRAMETHYLAMIDOFLUORIMUM, and DIMETHYLAMIDOPHENYLDIMETHYLPYRAZOLONE.

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On 03/13/2016 07:06 PM, rbowman wrote:

I always preferred $23 (On the Commodore-64 hex was indicated by a leading '$').
As to language, I was once looking at the source code for a program. One of the error messages was "not enough memory to execute child". It made perfect sense to me, just not anything like what it would mean to a "normal" person.
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Mark Lloyd
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On 3/13/2016 8:25 PM, Mark Lloyd wrote:

Limbo uses the XrR notation (i.e., 23r16) as it allows any radix to be indicated in a consistent syntax.

"Keyboard not found. Press F1 to continue."
"Bad magic"
"You can tune a filesystem, but you can’t tuna fish"
The Amiga would often spit up diagnostic data prefaced with "Guru Meditation"
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I remember that. Do you know why they used those words?
-- What's the fastest thing in Wales? A virgin sheep.
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Memory isn't needed to execute a child, you just need bleach or a knife.
--
What's a birth control pill?
The OTHER thing a woman can put in her mouth to keep from becoming pregnant.
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