OT What hours were the supermarkets open?

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A clever little girl.
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Back in the 50s the standard was for most businesses to open at 8am - a practice that badly needs to be reinstated. Time I wait until a bank opens these days it is at least 9:30am - shoots then entire morning.
Harry K
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micky wrote:

I remember them being open from 9 AM into early evening including weekends. A&P at least.

The Navy and college (IU).
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Micky,
I lived in Boston at that time. The local supermarket, Elm Farms, opened at 8:00 or 8:30 and closed at 19:00, I think. In the 60s the closing time was 21:00. That was Mon through Sat.. Only small "convenience" stores were open on Sun.
Dave M.
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David L. Martel wrote:

IIRC (also in the Boston suburbs) back in the 50s when the blue laws kept most stores closed on Sundays there was a suburban department store owned by Jews which was closed on Saturdays and open on Sundays.
Jeff
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micky wrote:

Here the grocery stores were open 9 to 5 during the week, and Saturday morning. Bakeries and butchers had the same hours. Dairy products, and ice, if you still had an icebox, were delivered to your home during the week. To this day I won't take my wife to the market on Saturdays, because all the really old coots still shop then, slowly. Banks had even worse hours for the consumer. The unions really fought to keep those hours; I never understood why, as they would have gained more members if the stores were open longer.
In the middle sixties we moved to Illinois and it was wonderful finding you could shop in the evening.
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chicago had union rules for the meat department, i am not certain of the rules just visiting as a kid, but in the evening when the butchers werent there the fresh meats were covered and locked securely you couldnt buy meat.. this was true up till the early 70s when i got my drivers license and helped drive me and my mom to chicago from pittsburgh. i was 16...
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Notat Home wrote:

For a non USAsian POV, I grew up in England in the 70's. Sounds pretty similar.
Shops 9-ish to 5pm or 5:30pm in the week. Saturdays maybe 9:30 or 10am to 4-4:40pm.
Sunday everything was closed except newsagents (papershops) and off-licenses (liquor stores). They closed at noon.
Wednesday afternoon - everything closed for 1/2 day.
Banks were dire - 10am to 3:30pm IIRC.
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I like that. With a little planning, people can buy their groceries on some other day of the week, and not have to break the Sunday sabbath.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
The big change in shopping hours came in the 1960's as malls proliferated. Stores that were open until 9 p.m. on weekdays, what a concept. Since the early malls often had supermarkets, the supermarkets also stayed open until 9 p.m.. The mall near me stayed open until 5 p.m. on Saturday. I think that it was not open on Sunday when it first opened.
Publix refused to open on Sunday for decades. The founder was very Christian and thought that people should be in church. On the door of the store there was a sign "Closed Sunday, See You in Church."
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On Wed, 28 Nov 2012 08:25:07 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

That works when both adults (if there are two) in the family don't. Frankly, stores that aren't open on Sundays piss me off. They're less likely to get my business during the week, too. Their decision, though.
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On 11/28/2012 7:25 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

...
Well, notwithstanding that Sunday isn't _necessarily_ the sabbath day, of course...
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On 11/28/2012 5:25 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Assuming they've adopted the Christian sabbath. In the area where I lived probably 30% of the population was not Christian. So they shopped at the competition. Sunday and other days.
Fortunately that nonsense is mostly over, except perhaps for Chick-Fil-A.
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wrote:

Exactly. For those whose sabbath is another day, forcing stores to close on Sunday not only means those people can't shop on the weekend, but that they can't open their own stores at all on the weekend either.
People who want to observe a sabbath day a certain way can choose not to shop on that day, not to open their store that day, or not to work for a store that does. They shouldn't be allowed to force everyone else to conform to their particular schedule.
Josh
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On 11/28/2012 12:15 PM, Josh wrote:

I can't wait for Sharia law to kick in. ^_^
TDD
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