OT: Voltage Converter for France

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My daughter is going to France as part of an HS school exchange program.
Here's what I know:
Her camera has a charger that can be used abroad without a voltage converter, just a plug adapter. Per the manual:
"The charger can be used in regions that have 100 - 240 V (50/60 Hz) AC power. Do not use electrical transformers for foreign travel as they will cause damage."
The charger itself has input ratings on the label that say 100 - 240 V (50/60 Hz) AC.
Here's what I'm curious about:
The charger for her iPod is the type with the transformer that plugs into a receptacle and uses a removable USB cable to connect to the device.
The input specs on that charger also say 100 - 240 V (50/60 Hz) AC.
I'm pretty sure that means that she can use that charger with just an adapter, i.e. no converter is needed, but I figured I'd ask just to be sure.
Am I correct?
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Gmmm, They are all universal input voltage switching power supply. Just get plug adaopter. My daughter is travelling europe right now after finishing her 3 month course in London.. She has MacBook. Canon dSLR camera, and iPhone with her. No problem. Good luck with her trip. Hope your daughter is bilingual. My kids are.
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wrote:

My daughter speak with forked tongue. Does that count?
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What Tony said is my experience as well. Be sure you have adapters for your plugs. In most of Europe they use plugs with 2 round pins for hot and neutral, and "weird" grounding connectors of different kinds. Buy the adapters here (US), because they're difficult to find over there.
Make provisions for emergency cash. There are pickpockets. DAMHIKT.
--
Best regards
Han
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On 04/09/11 10:34 am, Han wrote:
<snip>

And when I was in India for a few months a few decades ago I was told that (a) pickpockets like to hang out near the signs that say "Beware of Pickpockets": people will see the sign and pat the pocket where their wallet is to make sure it's still there, so the pickpocket knows which pocket to go for; and (b) some pickpockets are highly skilled, having been trained to slash with a razor or other implement and cut through a specific number of sheets of paper and thus can slash your pocket and get the wallet without you feeling it.
Perce
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Somehow I doubt that the daughter is going to carry a wallet in her rear pocket, but the overall pickpocket warning is VERY true. Also, arrange a code word to be used if she really gets in trouble, there are many many scams where supposedly abroad students e-mail home for $ $ to be sent/wired to a third party address and which are total scams.
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I carry two wallets in Europe. One in the back pocket that has maybe $2 in it and a couple of useless cards with no names on them. The other is carried elsewhere, be it a front pocket or inside a jacket. Cash is always split between us.
The best exchange rate is the ATM in most cases. My bank charges 1%.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Hi, I still think about the Gypsy woman who picked my pocket at the Barcelona subway station. I took my wallet back and kicked her so hard I still feel kinda sorry for her.
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wrote:

When I was in the Navy the street kids in Naples were pretty good at mobbing you and trying to pick your pocket. After the first time you got burned you learned to smack one so they kept away. My first time after I got pissed and chased them off I felt a breeze. They had unbuttoned my pea coat and got my smokes from the inside pocket. Never knew when it happened. After that I'd seriously try to smack one right off and they left me alone. Since I was forewarned by mates I kept my ID and cash in my zippered inside jumper pocket. Custom blues. Left my wallet on the ship. I never carry a wallet in dicey circumstances. Plenty of places to hide the jewels from pickpockets. Small inconvenience compared to possible loss.
--Vic
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Vic Smith wrote the following:

When I read the OP's message, I started remembering my time in the Navy back in the late 50s. Of all the ports I visited in the Med over a period of 2 years, Naples was the only one where you had to worry about pickpockets, and like you said, they were the kids. I walked alone, in a US Navy uniform, in many ports, just to see the way people lived, this included Beirut Lebanon, Istanbul Turkey, Split Yugoslavia, Tripoli Libya, Genoa Italy, Barcelona Spain. I never had a problem, in any way, in any of those ports.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On Sat, 9 Apr 2011 17:40:24 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Reminds of the guy who told me not to use hot water to put out a fire, Because it was HOT water. I thought just about everybody knows what happens when you freeze milk. And most have tasted powdered milk too. Maybe not. We were docked in Palermo, Sicily once and that was the only place I ever saw a public demonstration against the U.S. I went back to the fantail and the demonstrators were real close. They were peaceful, but they were singing and shouting some slogans in unison. I didn't understand the lingo. But their numerous signs were in English and said things like, "Yankee Imperialist Pigs Go Home!" "Running Dogs of Capitalism Be Gone." Typical commie stuff in the '60's. The hot water guy was there staring at the demonstration, and I came up next to him and said something. Can't remember what. I'll never forget what he said. "Smith, I've been watching these people for a while. I've got them figured out. You know what they are?" "What are they?" says I. He looks at me all seriously, and says, "These people are communists." I mean he was all proud of his deductive skills. I did what I usually did with him. Turned around and walked away. Thing about guys like this that get positions of power is they have mothers that love them, and/or some mentor similar to them in some respect, so they manage to do stupid stuff repeatedly. Not just once. The ones I've known just won't be told they're wrong either.
--Vic
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On 4/10/2011 2:48 PM, Vic Smith wrote:

And when they retire from active duty, a lot of them become DoD civilian employees, and then managers. DAMHIKT.
--
aem sends...

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...
I happened to come across a site that lists the CO's of just about every Loran Station over the years.
Our "let them drink frozen milk" CO was a pretty young guy when he became our CO. Younger than many Chiefs and even a few 1st Class enlisted men. He is now listed as "deceased" but it can't be from old- age.
If I found out that he died a violent death at the hands of an enlisted man, I would not be surprised at all.
During the winter I was in Germany, one of the enlisted men built a snow woman, in a kneeling position - and saluting - right in front of the CO's parking spot. We hid by a window watching when he pulled in.
He whipped into his spot as usual, looked up at the snow woman and paused for a second. Then he backed out, pulled into the second-in- command's spot and went directly into his office. He called the Chief of the maintenance crew and issued 2 orders:
1 - Destroy the snow woman. 2 - Switch the 2 parking signs, swapping his spot and the second-in- command's.
He was one strange dude.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

I agree that both your devices will work with an adapter.
I bought a kit with adapters that are said to include one for every configuration in the world. I bought it at a travel store and it was not inexpensive. I travel a lot and have used only one adapter from the kit other than the two prong continental adapter. Radio Shack sells the two prong continental adapter at a reasonable price. I'd suggest getting two or three, so you can do multiple devices at the same time.
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On 4/9/2011 10:06 AM, Not@home wrote:

Heck in England they use a plug that looks like it belongs on the end of an American electric clothes dryer cord. :-)
TDD
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On 04/09/11 11:52 am, The Daring Dufas wrote:

OR ELSE the UK plugs make US plugs look as if they belong in a 24V 5A system. And don't forget the UK "ring main" system, so every outlet has two paths back to the supply point. And the shuttered outlets into which junior can't stick a paperclip. And the device-appropriate fuse in each plug. And I bet they don't use "wire nuts" either.
Gee. I wonder which system is safer?
Perce
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My pet peeve as well - GFCIs on hairdryers. The vast majority of housing in the US has had GFCI or AFCIs on bath circuits for decades. Yet we're paying a premium to day to cover the one idiot who lives in substandard housing from electrocuting hiimself while drying hair in the shower.
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On 4/9/2011 2:18 PM, Robert Neville wrote:

I'd have to see some good stats to believe that claim. GFCI/AFCI protection may be the norm on post-1970 or so houses, but a large fraction, perhaps even a majority, of the housing stock in this country is older than that. Unless upgraded by an owner (and how often does that happen in non-DIY world?) or remodeled and brought up to current code, odds are the bath outlets are still as-built.
This 1960 house still had miswired 2-hole outlets in half the positions, but the boxes were grounded, so I replaced those with modern outlets, and tested every one. The original bath had a GFCI, but it was hung off the old 2-wire medicine cabinet feed, so I replaced the run for that one. But I grew up in the business (even though I'm not an electrician), so it wasn't a big deal for me. Most owners of older starter houses don't have the skill set or awareness of the dangers, and never will.
--
aem sends....


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wrote:

Same here. House built in '59. Not a single GFCI except about 6 still in the box. I should really put them in. (-: I've replaced about half the 2-hole outlets with 3-hole. Actually, my son did them.. It's all conduit and he used self-tappers to wire the receptacle ground to the boxes. No testing, just that the work. What do you recommend for testing? What always gets me is switches breaking the neutral. I never trust a switch to kill power. When a plumber replaced my lift system pump he said just turning off the pump wall switch should do when he started pulling the wires from the old pump. I told him I wouldn't trust the wall switch and suggested I run lighting to another circuit and flip the breaker supplying the pump. The lights we had on were the same circuit as the pump. But he said "No, this is fine." Then he got zapped. "Vic, go ahead and plug the lights in somewhere else and flip this breaker."
--Vic
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On Sat, 09 Apr 2011 18:55:09 -0500, Vic Smith

Live there for few years. If it doesn't burn down, they're okay.

When I was 19 I came across that in the big house that was our fraternity house. I was so young I wasn't 100% positive it was wrong. It was the porch light, in the ceiling of the porch very substantial porch, with part of the second floor over it. I assume it came with the house originally.

And it was wet too, I supposed. Ugh

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