OT very much. How can they remove a kidney for transplant laparoscopically?

Very OT
How can they remove a kidney for transplant laparoscopically?
Kidneys aren't big but they're not small either. The article says it was laparoscopic.
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wrote:

Craftsman tools do wonders.
They use a 1/2" drive metric socket set. (SAE if the person is over 40). 13HP Circular saw with 24 TPI carbide blade. 24 inch 5/8" diameter pry bar with offset. 1/8" to 3/4" tubing cutter. 3 Ton Hydraulic jack. Craftsman 240V 60A stick Welder, with 3/32" coated rods. Several hardened #8 Torx decking screws. Plus some JB Weld, extra slow drying epoxy.
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On 5/28/2015 8:22 PM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

That's only if you have Obamacare, rest of us use Harbor freight tools, 20% off.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Thu, 28 May 2015 19:22:21 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

I checked on this and since it's laparascopic, they 1/4" drive.
All your other tools are bigger than they shoudl be too.

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wrote:

Lararoscopic sounds like a better option than waking up after a night of coke and hookers then ending up in a bath tub full of ice.
Good times.
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On Thu, 28 May 2015 20:33:29 -0400, Seymore4Head

I saw that episode.

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<stuff snipped>

Doesn't sound like "Good Times" - sounds more like an episode of "House" or "Gray's Anatomy." (-:
--
Bobby G.



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micky wrote:

It is possible kidney as well as gall bladder, etc. THrough the hold you kinda insert a bag and wrap it and cut it off. It can happen the procedure can injure other nearby organ. Using laser incision and HD image... This is simplistic explanation. Remember I had kidney X-plant in early 1996.
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I guess the hole stretches and shrinks back again after you pull something through it. Maybe. Or maybe it's laparascopic with a 3 or 4" incision, just big enough to get it through.

Wow. Is it still working? I guess so or you wouldn't be posting, or you'd say you'd had a second one.
I have a friend, 66 y.o. who needs one. She also had non-Hodgkin's lymphoma 13 years ago and the antireection drugs they use for transplants will make a recurrance of the NHL more likely. Ugh.
BTW, if I knew that, I forgot it. Plus I don't think I read this ng in 1996 (though it's close.)
I want you to know I've been carrying a kidney donor card since 1969.
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micky wrote:

I was lucky having O positive most common blood type. Yes, my kidney is still working near 100%. Over the years carefully I reduced dosage of all the med. I was prescribed. I reached a point where I can't reduce dosage any more without affecting routine blood test. I strongly believe that was the trick. I documented what I did in detail and my specialist just said, "Good, keep up the good work" I am not diabetic, have normal BP and cholesterol level which are all possible side effects from the anti-rejection med. My immune strength is always less than 100%, like 70-80%. In winter I try not to catch cold which could lead bigger issues even death... I still have check up every 4 months. No cost to me including med. If I were down there, I'd probably went bankrupt by now, LOL! Your kidney don't match to your friend for donation?
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That's great. Given the year, this was from a deceased donor, right?

She's not diabetic, and afaik the rest of her stuff is good. She was overweight but lost most of that when she had non-Hodgkins lymphoma 13 years ago. Unfortunately, it turns out that one is never cured, only in remission. She had been in great health since then though, playing tennis twice a week, working 2 jobs, busy with other stuff all the rest of the time.

I'm mixed up. I think my blood type, O+ would be okay. She's A+ iirc. But I'm 68 y.o. and doctors don't like that, unless they are desperate or its a likely good match,and I'm no more likely than anyone. And franklly I never had in mind to be a living donor. No one talked about that in 1969 or even 89. All I had in mind was after I died, when you can have anything you want (by which I mean organs. Even then I'm not willing to be a cadaver in an anatomy lab, despite the shorrtage. They can just share, something their parents should have taught them when they were little.) I read that at Moses Montefiore Medical Center, which is a the center of this stuff in the Bronx, in 20 years, they've only had one donor who later needed a kidney himself. Donors go to the top of the line and should have little trouble getting at least a cadaver kidney.
And her first look was at her sons. Her first son didn't match but her second son has passed 3 levels of tests plus the psychological test and he's about to have what I guess is the last set of tests. I don't know what the odds are that one fails this set, or even what they test for.
I suppose if he passes they will do this within a couple months.
She's not on dialysis yet, but what I was reading yesterday says that that that's the time to do it. They used to wait until people were at death's door, and had a low survival rate because of that. But even healthy but on dialysis is longer than they want to wait now. This only applies if one can find a living donor, or fortunate tissue matching brings an early dead donor.
But her problem is that the anti-rejection drugs will increase the chance of a recurrence of the lymphoma, which it seems always recurs anyhow. if you wait long enough, But this may well speed it. Ugh.
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LOL If this were a personal problem, I wouldn't be asking here.

I need someone present who needs it. Can't do it myself.
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On 2015-05-28 5:54 PM, micky wrote:

Using this new technology called a "search engine"
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003001.htm
Laparoscopic kidney removal:
Your surgeon will make 3 or 4 small cuts, usually no more than 1-inch each, in your belly and side. The surgeon will use tiny probes and a camera to do the surgery. Towards the end of the procedure, your doctor will make one of the cuts larger (around 4 inches) to take out the kidney. The surgeon will cut the ureter, place a bag around the kidney, and pull it through the larger cut. This surgery may take longer than an open kidney removal. However, most people recover faster and feel less pain afterwards compared to open surgery. Sometimes, your surgeon may make a cut in a different place than described above.
Some hospitals and medical centers are doing this surgery using robots.
--
Dr. WTF



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wrote:

I didn't mean for someone to use, how you say, a search engine.
I figured with all the wisdom here, someone would know this stuff off the top of his head. Especially you, since you're a doctor.

So there will be 2 or 3 other cuts, in addition! Messing up my belly! I can't have that messed up so much. Poets have written odes to my belly.

So I was close. I said 3 or 4. 4 is worse.

That bag is a good idea.

Well, I guess if I really cared about the other person, I'd be willing to accept the scar, even if it's all over the place.

I didn't know robots could donate kidneys. That seems like the best all-around solution.
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wrote:

Since this is alt.home.repair and not some medical group, I had no clue what Laparoscopy even meant. I'm sure others are asking the same question. So, from :
http://www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/laparoscopy-16156
Laparoscopy is a surgery that uses a thin, lighted tube put through a cut (incision) in the belly to look at the abdominal organs camera.gif or the female pelvic organs camera.gif. Laparoscopy is used to find problems such as cysts, adhesions, fibroids camera.gif, and infection. Tissue samples can be taken for biopsy through the tube (laparoscope).
In many cases laparoscopy can be done instead of laparotomy surgery that uses a larger incision in the belly. Laparoscopy can be less stressful and may have less problems and lower costs than laparotomy for minor surgeries. It can often be done without needing to stay overnight in the hospital.
* (there's more on the website)!
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