OT: Vent: Car Repair Charge

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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Last time I took a car to a dealer for service, it was to replace motors for power window. $200+. Mebbe just one window. As a "service", they looked under the hood and found over $900 in needed repairs, which included new carb. I didn't know at the time that the same dealer had already replaced the carb on the same car. I said no thanks. I then proceeded to my usual mechanic and we tried to find something wrong with the carb. I made up a story that my husband thought he smelled gas and thought the carb might be bad. That was '94. Still driving the same car, same carb, different good mechanic (I relocated). I just did a little cosmetic work on Miss Regal (Bondo and stainless steel wool), and she looks as good as I do :o) Runs great.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

You can buy OBDII readers from harbor freight. They also reset the computer.
More than that, you need to peruse the FSM, be mechanically minded, have tools, and learn about the peculiarities of your particular vehicle.
As to the hose repair/replacement, you don't need a computer code to tell you a hose is faulty, you determine that by using your eyes and fingers. The only special tools required are hose assembly/dissasembly tools available at your local auto parts store. You can also jerry rig hose connectors using transmission fluid hose and a couple of hose clamps.
Jack up your car and look around. Touch things, and make sure you understand what each component does. When you find one which is new to you, look it up in the manual. Repeat until you "know" your car.
It help tremendously if you can find a forum online with discussions about your particular vehicle (or at least a similar vehicle with similar systems). Extra bonus points if there is a community of enthusiasts for your car.
Is it worth your time to do this? To be honest, it's not to a lot of guys. If it is, know that if a man built it, another man, you, can figure it out and fix it.
Jon
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On Fri, 26 Jun 2009 14:37:34 -0700, "Jon Danniken"

And most today are built in large part by robots. Sometimes you have to be part robot to fix it too.
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on 6/26/2009 10:25 PM (ET) snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote the following:

In the old days, I was of the mindset that if some worker put something together, I could take it apart and put it back together. It became a little harder when things started being manufactured in Japan, since those Japanese women had such small hands. :-)
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On Sat, 27 Jun 2009 08:59:52 -0400, against all advice, something

I have a German car built in Hungary by Romanian guest workers. It has big plastic panels covering the motor, with little stickers that say "No user serviceable parts inside".
I don't mess with it.
--

Don\'t worry about people stealing an idea. If it\'s original, you will
have to ram it down their throats.
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Don't go back to that shop. It's shady.
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