OT: "Tupperware" et ilk

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wrote:

Yes, the clips are hinged. There isn't a solid connection between the box and clip. I guess the term for them is modular latch box. Staples sells IRIS brand. http://preview.tinyurl.com/q48z7nf It wouldn't bother a bachelor one little bit to use these for food. I observe the fifteen second or so rule for food and floor.
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On 12/19/2015 3:22 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:

Excellent! We'll put them on the "let's have a look-see" list for next shopping day! Thx!

The (top) handle is kind of a downside. Might make stacking difficult. E.g., we currently use ziploc's to "organize" things: this one contains hot dogs wrapped in pairs, this one has individually wrapped steaks, this one has individually wrapped chunks of chicken breasts, this one has 2C bags of walnuts, this one has cleaned pork tenderloins, this one...
The bags are then crammed in the "baskets" in the freezer; this basket has baking goods, this one has red meats, this one has fresh-frozen fruit, etc.
The same sort of thing happens in the bottom of the freezer with containers stacked atop each other. I.e., the containers I use for sauce can be stacked two-high and still not interfere with the movement of the baskets above.
Ideally, I'd like to find a nice USEFUL container size that can fit these sorts of needs in both places.

For liquid products (e.g., spaghetti sauce) the Tupperware sort of seal helps keep moisture out, protect against casual spillage, etc.
There's no number of "seconds" I'd tolerate sauce ON the floor! :> (nor am I keen on cleaning it up, afterwards!)
[I once got overzealous carrying containers of freshly made sauce out to the freezer. Had six or eight in my arms at the same time. When reaching for the door to the garage, some shifted and fell. What a frigging mess!! I have thus learned that an extra trip or two is well worth the reduced risk of dropping the things!]
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On 12/19/2015 01:01 PM, Don Y wrote:

Clear plastic containers are preferred for geocaching these days. More than one ammo can has been blown to hell by the bomb squad when someone reported a suspicious item but at least with a plastic box they can usually see it's harmless.
Given that usage, the ones with the self-hinged locks on four sides do tend to lose the locks. The older Tupperware types or the similar knockoffs hold up amazingly well.
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On 12/19/2015 3:01 PM, Don Y wrote:

Never tried them for the freezer, but we use the Sterilite containers for dry goods. The oldest are about 5 or 6 years and holding up well. Never had a lid pop off.
We also got rid of the assorted plasticware of many types and replaced it Rubbermaid containers that stack well and the lids lock on the bottom so you can find them.
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On 12/19/2015 6:30 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

We have some (really big!) sterlite containers that we use in the garage to store the king size bed sheets that we use to cover the citrus trees. I.e., several cubic feet internal volume. They have a sort of sliding latch built into opposing ends of the lid: place lid on container, slide latches inward to engage. This works reasonably well -- *if* you are vigilant and keep the latches in place as you are moving the large containers around. But, the latches move too easily so often come undone as you heft the container into its place on the top shelf, etc.

Most of the containers that we use for "raw" storage (spaghetti sauce, grated cheeses, etc.) are Rubbermaid. They suffer from the "stiff lid" syndrome I mentioned in my post.
Unfortunately, most of the ones that we find most useful do *not* stack well; no draft angle on the container so they don't nestle inside each other conveniently. Those that *do* tend not to see much use because they have that odd taper. A notable exception are some of the ~8x8x2 square containers that stack reasonably well inside each other and very well on top of each other when full. Rectangular always preferable to round when you are concerned with maximizing use of available volume!
E.g., store bought OJ containers pack really nicely into the bottom of the freezer. When we use our (reusable) cylindrical containers, we have to take pains to densely pack them to avoid those big voids between containers!
[We try to pack the freezer as if it was a solid block of goods, not as a loose collection!]
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