OT Tire slow leak

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On Wed, 12 Mar 2014 09:46:27 -0400, Stormin Mormon

When I graduated from a "government high school" in 1969 I knew enough about auto repair to be able to skip the first third of the apprenticeship schooling and was able to more than earn my keep as an apprentice.. Minimum 2 hours a day for 2 years in auto class (double major). after 1 year of regular "rotating" shop classes starting in 10th grade. (took academics 'till grade 9 -music, french etc)
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I've never used any of the products in a can, but it's my understanding that it costs more to repair a flat if you use that stuff. Don't they have to scrap it out of the tire before plugging/patching it?
I heard it can totally screw up the balance of the tire.
If Wikipedia is right, then there are other issue, including explosions, to be concerned about.
Stolen without permission from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canned_tire_inflator
Current issues
The biggest complaint by tire professionals regarding tire inflators is around removing the sealant from inside the tire. They believe that it is a difficult, time-involved process that may damage the tire. Some brands like Fix-A-Flat offer a water-soluble formulation that allows the product to be removed quickly and easily with a towel and water.[citation needed]
The gas used in some inflators contains butane which is flammable and which may explode if exposed to high temperatures (either when in the can or in a re-inflated tire). Other inflators use a non-flammable formulation instead.[citation needed]
Also for safety reasons, the US National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration has mandated that all 2008 vehicles sold in the US and manufactured on or after September 1, 2007 must be equipped with tire pressure monitoring systems. Because many of these sensors are inside the tire, there was a concern about whether or not canned tire inflators and sealants would affect the sensors’ ability to correctly operate. Manufacturers have been working on finding solutions to this new legislation.[citation needed]
If a canned tire inflator is used on a tire mounted on a wheel with chrome plating, then it is very important to thoroughly clean the entire wheel and the inside of the tire in order to prevent Chrome Peel.[1]
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On 3/11/2014 2:51 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I've been told by a local auto shop manager that they won't work on tires that have had that stuff used on them. Safety hazard for the techs, and fixing a flat isn't profitable enough to make the aggro and risk worthwhile.
However, a growing number of new car models don't come with even a donut spare; instead, they come with only a can of fix-a-flat. Dunno what that means in terms of tire service/sales.
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micky wrote:

I've never used the "string" thing. Is the string covered with some soft or sticky substance or is that what the "glue" you carry is for?
Jeff
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On 3/19/2014 1:10 PM, Jeff Wisnia wrote:

Some of the tire plugging kits, like Walmart carries, the inserts are kind of like pine tree branch, but black tar. Doesn't look like something I'd invite to dinner, but they do seem to plug tread holes.
Other plugging kits use round rubber, which needs the (separate) tube of rubber cement.
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Oren wrote:

The kits I have came with a tube of cement. If nothing else, the cement acts as a lubricant as you push the string in.
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KenK wrote:

Hi, Remount the tire.
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A good tire shop should find that leak without too much trouble. You (or they) will need a tank to test it in. I've found leaks that took a month to loose 10psi
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On 3/11/2014 1:00 PM, KenK wrote:

Any tire shop should be able to easily find such a leak. All they have to do is inflate the tire to the maximum pressure as given on the sidewall and immerse it in the tank. Even a tiny leak is detectable in this way.
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I disagree. I think there is a good chance a tire shop WILL find the leak. Or you could try to locate it yourself using soapy water. Be sure to check the valve itself and where the bead meets the rim too. If you have something that holds water that you can place the tire in, even a leak as slow as you describe can often be found. Depending on your driving habits and the amount of tread left, you may want to try plugging it yourself too.
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a very cheap friend of mine tolerated a slow leak for 2 years, before selling the vehicle. he was proud he saved the 20 bucks for tire repair......
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Ken,

As other's have mentioned, take the wheel off and cover the tire/wheel with soapy water. Even a slow leak will cause the soap to bubble up.
If you have a container big enough to hold the entire wheel, fill it with water and dunk the wheel. You should see the air bubbles easily enough.
Don't rule out the wheel itself. I had a set of alloy wheels years ago with one rim leaked through the metal. I kept looking for leaks in the tires, without any success. Then I put soapy water on the inside back of the rim and it bubbled up right through the metal. Cheap wheels. I just kept inflating the tires regularly until I could afford new wheels.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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On Wed, 12 Mar 2014 04:40:38 +0000 (UTC), HerHusband

It doesn't have to hold the hole wheel. Just a portion, up to the rim (and a little higher I see from ;your next paragraph. ) Then rotate the tire so eventually all of it is under water.

Wow. that's amazing. First time I've heard of that. Thanks.

OTOH, really cheap wheels, that is standard steel wheels, no special alloy, used on trucks and plenty of cars, can be dented at the rim when hitting a chuckhole or maybe a curb, making the rim not round but indented there, and they can be straightened with hammer. When it's leaking like that, you can usually put on goggles and hit the dent from behind, which is usually from the side, and knock the wheel back to round, or very close to it. You can use a carpenter's hammer or just about any heavy hammer. You have to really whack it sometimes. It's good practice learning how much effort it takes to bend steel.
You probably don't have to take the tire off.
I don't think anything in the rim or tire is hard enough to make the hammer head shatter, but I'd wear goggles anyhow. or at least safety glasses. Maybe you'll miss and hit something underneath the wheel.
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wrote:

On a trip from Livingstone Zambia up to the Northern Province during the 1973/74 rainy season with the '67 Peugeot 204 we bent the rims in potholes to the point I stopped and hammered them straight at east half a dozen times during the trip. We had half a ton and 4 adults in the car - and Michelin Airstop tubes in the tires to keep the air in.
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All it needs to fix that is a coat of paint/laquer on the inside of the wheel.
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On Wed, 12 Mar 2014 04:40:38 +0000 (UTC), HerHusband

Pop the tire off, clean the inside of the rim, and paint with a good urethane paint - no more rim leaks
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That was always on my list of things to try, but I never got around to it. I don't have the tools to remove and reseat a tire myself. It was my daily driver so I never found the time to take the wheel off and take it to a shop to remove the tire so I could work on it.
It was easier to gripe about it and keep adding air every week. :)
I did try deflating the tire and patching it from the outside, but that wasn't successful. There was an area a little bit bigger than a quarter where you could see air bubbles bleeding through the metal (when soapy water was applied).
Eventually, I found a nicer set of wheels so it wasn't an issue anymore.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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Remove the wheel and spray or brush the whole thing (including the valve and wheel/tyre joint) with soapy water and look for bubbles. You should find a leak that size easily.
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On 3/11/2014 1:00 PM, KenK wrote:

My locally owned, been-around-forever tire shop does a good job. $12 last time (first for this car) to clean the rim. All done. I tried to pay more but they wouldn't take more :o) Wouldn't even take a donation to the coffee fund! Dang. They don't advertise, don't need to, which proves my theory that word-of-mouth is the best advertising. OTOH, when my daughter bought tires from Walcrooks, she bought a huge headache. I tried to bring her up right, but she HAD to shop at the Wal.
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Spit test the valve. If no joy there have a tire shop break them down, clean and seal the rims. I've had to do that 3-4 times, with both aluminum and steel rims. One time it took the shop twice to get it right.
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