OT The metric conversion of the US would happen if they taught it in school.

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On Dec 30, 3:29 pm, "Stormin Mormon"

Yep. Those picnickers were scrambling and piloting an engine out 747 to a safe landing...Wow!
Harry K
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On 12/30/2011 9:31 PM, Harry K wrote:

It wasn't a 747, it was a 767 twin engine airliner. ^_^
http://archives.cbc.ca/science_technology/aeronautics/clips/1155 /
http://preview.tinyurl.com/59tcnv
TDD
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wrote:

..
Thanks. I actually had to google that befoe I believed you? It ain't what you know that hurts, it is what one knows that is wrong :)
Harry K
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On 12/31/2011 12:01 PM, Harry K wrote:

I remembered that the pilots made that incredible emergency landing and afterwards, every time it was tried in a simulator, the plane crashed. I think the pilot flew gliders for fun and actually used his glider skills by side slipping the big plane to bleed off air speed. ^_^
TDD
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On Dec 31 2011, 10:49 am, The Daring Dufas <the-daring-

m...
Yes, I recall something about gliders but 'side slipping' is part of standard powered flight training also.
Harry K
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On 1/1/2012 10:04 AM, Harry K wrote:

I seem to remember, that because of no power, the airliner's air brakes were non-functional so he had to side slip like a simple glider to slow down.
TDD
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ups.com...
True but as a desperation measure only as the aircraft will most likely be totalled. That aside it is not in play in the Gimli Glider incident. The side slip referred to was _in the air_.
Harry K
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Dummy, if you're worried about "making a crash survivable" you aren't much worried about totaling the aircraft.
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Care to name ONE aircraft that is designed to be ground looped?
As for the second part: WTF??
Harry K
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On Fri, 30 Dec 2011 08:09:40 -0800, harry wrote:

Yeah, that one confused me when I first moved to the US. I'd never heard of a cup as a unit of measurement before. A cup is something that you put tea in, and is of variable capacity :-)
cheers
Jules
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On 12/31/11 10:19 am, Jules Richardson wrote:

I think the "standard cup" varies between countries too: 10 fl. oz. in the UK, 8 fl. oz. in USA (half of their respective pints).
Of course the really odd thing is that American cooks measure ingredients by volume in the first place, especially when "one cup" of some ingredients (e.g., flour) could be subject to considerable variation, depend on the degree to which it is packed.
Electronic kitchen scales (switchable between Imperial and Metric, of course) were available in the UK before we could ever find any in the USA.
Perce
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Must be hard using headstones . Bada-Boom :-)
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As did I, in the early '60s. We were also taught arithmetic (in several bases, no less ;-).
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It's already happened. Looked at a container of liquid, lately? It's already taught in schools. Perhaps not in K-12, but the minute you go on to higher education, it's ALL metric. If you can't handle it, hit the road, dolt! Machine tools and have all been in both SAE and metric for decades. Most mechanical devices, from cars to toys, are made with metric fasteners.
I think the primary reason the drive to change to metric petered out back in the 70s is because the govt realized they'd have to pay to change all those mile road markers to kilometers and reprint all the milage signs. Weighed against losing votes to raise taxes and/or not getting a raise in congress, screw a buncha metric! ;)
nb
--
Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year

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On Thu, 29 Dec 2011 22:35:35 +0000, notbob wrote:

I grew up in England with speeds and distances using Imperial measurements, but just about everything else using metric, and it never seemed like a big deal - distance signs are really only there to provide an estimate of how long a journey's going to take, and drive for any length of time and you get a feel for where the vehicle's at in relation to the signed speed limit anyway. It may as well all be in furlongs and furlongs/minute for all I care.
When it comes to precise measurements, I do find that metric suits me better for smaller-scale work, and yards/feet/inches works better for e.g. working on the house, so I routinely make use of both. Thankfully I don't work for NASA. :-)
Oh, I've got a couple of kids in middle school and one in elementary; they seem to work in both systems interchangeably.
cheers
Jules
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On 12/30/2011 2:14 PM, Jules Richardson wrote:

Hubble needed you, where were you? ^_^
TDD
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I find metric much easier to deal with. It's all base 10. The only place it is not an advantage is temperature. Fahrenheit is more granular than Celsius, at roughly 4 deg F for every 1 deg C.
You wanna see how screwy US measurements are? Ask yer avg American to explain the difference between the weight of 1 oz and the volume of 1 oz. Whenever this subject comes up on rec.food.cooking, the mustard is off the hot dog!! ;)
nb
--
Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year

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notbob wrote the following:

Everyone in rec.food.cooking should have a kitchen scale besides the measuring cup. :-p
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On Dec 30 2011, 3:14 pm, Jules Richardson

I have no problem using either standard its just a real bitch to convert between the two sometimes.
Jimmie
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notbob wrote:

I was going to say the same. I was exposed to metric conversions in K-12, but never in a 'practical' sense. It wasn't until college when I realized metric was alive and well, and the high school should have focused more on it.
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