OT T Boone Pickens

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote: ...

Whose design, do you know? The common German design used around here is a fixed 22.5 rpm irrespective of wind speed from minimum to max for voltage control. But again, these are large farms that are dispatched, not scattered single onesy, twosy type of installations. But, each turbine is monitored and can be controlled remotely.
Gray Co that I've mentioned before is 170 660KW Vesta for a total installed capacity of 112.2 MW. Basic statistics are at http://www.fplenergy.com/portfolio/contents/gray_county.shtml
A summary of it's operational potential -- I've done the same on a monthly basis from EIA statistics over a six-year period and found essentially the same values.

http://www.protecttheflinthills.org/information/Gray%20Co%20%20Wind%20Power%20Facts.pdf ....
I don't think Doppler radar can do dry air wind speed--it's the rain particles entrained in the air that they measure afaik.

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I am not sure but this is typical of the ones scattered around the Niagara area of Ontario
http://esteroriverheights.com/electrical/new_england/ontario_windmill.jpg
They pitch the whole blade.
The ones in Minot ND only pitch the tips.
http://esteroriverheights.com/electrical/wind_turbine_minot_nd.jpg
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On Thu, 24 Jul 2008 22:42:01 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

These are the ones off the Fort Erie coast. The ones in Cape Cod would be about 8 times farther away. I am not sure how much of the view they would obstruct. It would just be a white dot on the horizon.
http://esteroriverheights.com/electrical/new_england/wind_turbines_lake_erie.jpg
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Meaning, exactly what? That the locations suitable for windmilss are so extremely limited that offshore Cape Cod, which most people would agree is a pristine view, is on the short list? According to Pickens, the whole midwest of the USA is highly suitable for wind power.

Thanks for the ignorant slam. Perhaps you can share with us where you superior folks live so we can return the favor.

Last time I checked there are many viable and more practical ways to produce electricity besides windmills. We get an insignificant amount of power from them today and could easily continue to do so in the future without any great calamity.

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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote: ...

No, meaning it has one of the best energy potential sites in the NE where there is the need for power...

And you're perfectly content that as long as _your_ sightlines aren't compromised its ok if ours are, I take it??? :(
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IIRC, the voters (NE) didn't even want windmills off shore, so far they were _out_of_site_out_of_mind_. You know, past the curve of the Earth.

I say we put up thousand of fans off Cape Cod.
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Only if most people there are OK with having windmills there. There could be benefits that make them attractive as well. Some areas have clearly agreed to have them. Palm Springs, CA is one example. If the tax revenue base, jobs, etc makes them worthwhile and the locals are OK with it, then it's fine with me. On the other hand, if some other areas don't want them because they ruin our view of the ocean and choose nuclear power, do you have a problem with that?
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote: ...

If you'll actually choose and do, no; I'd far prefer it over wind as being the most reliable, cost-effective solution for central generation even here. OTOH, it's that area of the country that has also shut down at least one and forced another to never start up over nothing but populist politics and NIMBY-ism.
The problem I have is that most who don't want option a, b, c, ... want the benefits but none of the requirements to help with any alternative option and are more than glad to let somebody else take their garbage (so to speak). CA building in AZ comes to mind as does their incessant water grab...
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

If they chose a viable alternative, then no. However I don't think those same people would be willing to have a nuclear power plant with 100 miles, must less 50 miles.
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Jim Rusling
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Jim Rusling wrote:

There are several nuclear power plants within 100 miles of here, they don't bother me a bit. But the damned windmills that are popping up annoy me no end.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Well, sure. People in Oklahoma are used to windmills, albeit much smaller ones. Windmills are everywhere.
People in Oklahoma are also used to oil wells. And Indians.
Oklahoma is Texas' attic; the place where we store all our crazy aunts.
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So, how are things in Baja Oklahoma??? (G&D&R)
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HeyBub wrote: ...

A windmill here and there is a far cry from several hundred wind generating turbines.
And, altho beside the point, the number of windmills is rapidly dwindling as there is a use for solar that is catching on pretty quickly where they haven't gone to submersible grid power (or in many places they're making the move to solar from the grid). Water tables are lower and windmills require a lot of maintenance.
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dpb wrote:

For what they do, you only need one here and one there.
Besides, sometimes there's not enough wind to turn two windmills.

Windmills require NO maintenance (except to turn the vane so they'll quit pumping).
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HeyBub wrote:

anything that sits outside, moving parts or not, eventually requires maintenance. The trick is to make those required upkeep chores as cheap and easy as possible.
-- aem sends...
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HeyBub wrote: ...

If there's enough to turn one, there's enough to turn as many as you wish -- they don't interfere.
...

Snicker, snort... :)
You've obviously never tried to keep a bunch of them running on a large ranch... :(
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dpb wrote:

Took a while to find it on the web, but for the prime example...
Windmills: surviving on the Plains By DARLA BRACKEN ... "The XIT Ranch had 325 windmills over its vast 3 million acres and a special full time crew to take care of them. There were many different types and designs and hundreds of companies manufacturing them between the 1880s and into the 1920s and 1930s."
While others weren't as large as the XIT, the fulltime windmill crew was a common occupation until thru the 30's into the war years on the High Plains. The manpower shortage during the war really was the beginning of the emphasis to shift to alternate power sources although it didn't become terribly prevalent until the 50s and 60s as electric power distribution lines expanded drastically w/ the advent of the electric co-op's(1).
It was also dangerous business often, having to climb a tower w/ a runaway vane after the brakeline had broken being one of most perilous.
...
(1) We were supplied totally by wind until after WWII when in '48 got REA hookup for the first time. Until then, both windmill and Delco 32V windcharger system were our water and only electric power on the place.
The windcharger was immediately decommisioned, of course, the windmill continued until the well casing failed and a new well was drilled in the mid/late 50s. It, of course, used submergible pump and much larger capacity.
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junk. :)
Originally from Texas.
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Jim Rusling
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

One of the windest places in the North east is the top of Mt. Washington. Lets put a bunch of windmills up there. Probably could power the whole NE.
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nuke plants have that little problem with waste hazardous for a million years, and make excellent terrorists targets.
the used fuel pools are in unhardened steel buildings, a airliner, or small plane into one of those buildings would make thousands of miles of land unihabitabe.
i am all for nuke power once they solve the waste problem.
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