OT Surgery prices.

Page 1 of 5  
From Carpe Diem: http://tinyurl.com/6tch2m2
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/7/2012 7:17 PM, Dean Hoffman > wrote:

A point here?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/7/12 7:27 PM, gonjah wrote:

I just thought it might interest some folks. It reminds me a bit of when I was a kid 40+ years ago. My mom would take me to the doc, get me fixed up, and pay on the way out. Cash and carry. I wonder how prices would be if that was the general rule now.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/22/2012 5:02 PM, Dean Hoffman > wrote:

AFAIK, because the US is one of the leaders in research and development, we get the tab. In Japan I understand the government sets a low price for MRIs so they had to develop a cheaper MRI machine. So if you needed an MRI, it costs the patient a fraction of what it costs here.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId 0545569
I ran accounts receivable for several clinics and the prices were based on what Medicare would pay. We adjusted private pay accordingly. So if Medicare went up, so did private. I'm not sure if this is as true anymore but, for the 10 years I worked accounts receivable, Medicare was driving up the prices each year. Your tax dollars at work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
gonjah <gonjah.net> wrote in

Which medical care institution or physician practice charges private patients the same as Medicare reimburses them?? The bills I have seen were generally several times what Medicare reimburses.
--
Best regards
Han
email address is invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/23/2012 7:46 AM, Han wrote:

Yeah......See the post I did below about labs. I did so much "pricing" I get fuzzy about exactly how I did each item over the years. That was over nine years ago. The point is we raised pricing when Medicare raised prices (except for room and board and that was as needed.) As I recall, I'd post the Medicare price and use a factor like 1.8 and enter that into the computer to set the private or private insurance rate. But for some items, like labs, there wasn't a factor. It was just the highest the owner thought we could charge. It was probably left to my discretion.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 22 Apr 2012 17:02:39 -0500, Dean Hoffman

There are a few doctors and clinics operating that way. Cheap and sustainable.
I recall paying $5 to $6 to see a doctor back in the late 50's. That translates to about $45 today. My doctor bills $225 per visit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Depending on what I'm there for, my doctor charges between $48 and something like $75; not too far from your numbers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/22/2012 9:19 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

For the items I billed for, which were numerous, private pay was always the highest by far. There was no limit on the price ceiling. If Medicare paid $18 the clinic might charge $100. Private was where you "made up" for other loses. IIRC, it was particularly true for blood work. Some reagents are expensive and Medicare B reimbursement was really low so we had to jack them as high as we could to afford the reagents. Sad but true. We had a small lab so we couldn't buy reagents like the big labs do. Unfortunately, The lab eventually went out of business. It was really sad because we had to let a good person go. Some Medicare Part B reimbursement was tricky but Part A *was* a cash cow. Looking back it was almost like legalized crime. You all should be happy it ain't like that no more but now the reimbursement is so low, for part B at least, many docs are going to have to drop Medicare and Medicaid and only except private pay or go under. Them times they are a changin'. No more free ride.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Apr 7, 8:27pm, gonjah <gonjah.net> wrote:

There is a point here. Instead of national health insurance where the govt hands out more money, there are simple steps that could be taken to make the free market work in healthcare just like it does in so many other markets. That list of procedures should be required to be posted on the web by every hospital and service provider. Then we would have PRICE DISCOVERY.
CBS news just had a story on a study done in California that looked at the cost of an apendectomy without complications. The cost ran from $1500 to $182,000. The median was around $35,000. Under Medicare the govt pays $7500. Now if you had the cost posted for the procedure, you could find out approximately how much it should cost BEFORE you went and had the procedure. Then you could choose your hospital accordingly.
Just a simple thing, but it's a very reasonable one, that could be easily implemented and is long overdue. How many bureaucracies do we have at the federal and state level for consumer protection? Yet we don't have a requirement that hospitals, test facilities, etc provide prices?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 04/24/12 08:56 am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

But when you are in urgent need of an appendectomy you don't have time to shop around, and maybe the cheapest one doesn't accept your insurance plan.
A TV program a couple weeks back quoted an economist who is in general a supporter of the "free market" but said that it doesn't work for health care: if you are considering buying a car, you can shop around, decide on the Ford or the Chevy or the Nissan. or decide not to buy one at all; but if you need open-heart surgery your choices are limited and you don't have the option of simply walking away.
Perce
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But the vast majority of the insurance expenditures are NOT for emergency procedures and you have plenty of time to shop around.
--
People thought cybersex was a safe alternative,
until patients started presenting with sexually
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Exactly. Even with an appendicitis, in most cases you'd have 30 mins for you or someone else to take a look on the web at the hospital options. I sure would before I just go in blind. And even if the lowest cost one doesn't accept your insurance, there might be other ones that do that are still a lot less than where you would wind up if you just went to the most convenient.
The whole point obviously goes beyond this. When you have price discovery you enable the free market to work. It doesn't require everyone to find and get the lowest price. People looking at the prices posted will result in business being lost by the hospitals with prices that are out of line. That brings pressure on those hospitals to reduce prices.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

BS. the hospitals will just stop performing non-profitable surgeries. They will eventually closed down the emergency room and finally since they now have more time, staff and resources, they will concentrate on serving the very rich. The end result is that the only place to get the non-profitable surgeries will be at facilities that aren't good enough to attract the rich client and therefore not profitable enough to attract the best staff, much less the competent staff.
and then the rich will start suing the lower-tier hospitals because they weren't able to rush there to get an emergency in-grown toe-nail fixed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
sosted will result in business being lost by the

That is already happening. MCaid prices have shrunk to so far below costs that hospitals are refusing to take non-emergency cases for MCaid payment. Last year there was a survey in one of the Emergency Medicine Medicine Journals showing that 97% of ED docs had had at least one patient come to their ED because they were on MCaid and couldn't find a doc who would treat them. You are also seeing more and more docs, especially the specialists but also Primary Care, who are not accepting new MCare patients. Should be getting a lot worse as the changes brought about by Obamacare begin to kick in. The government program already pay 60 cents or less for every dollar the Evil Insurance Companies do on comparable treatments. That, too, will get worse.
--
People thought cybersex was a safe alternative,
until patients started presenting with sexually
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

oh, it's not always about docs not treating, it's about the fact that if you aren't in some form of HMO, how do you get treated for an URGENT problem when the doctors office is closed. Around here some of the hospitals are triaging to urgent care or emergency care which must be saving them something

Then those patients aren't using the available help available from such places as Senior Centers that have Medicare Specialists. I availed myself of their services and it should be making my medical care better than it has ever been

could be, but probably not

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Apr 24, 2:18pm, "Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds" <atlas-

Obviously spoken like a typical socialist who is against free markets. Why do you have a problem with folks being able to see prices and choosing? Do you just walk into a car dealer and say "I'll take an SUV, I don't care what it costs?" And you don't see a problem when the cost of an appendectomy without complications costs anywhere from $1500 to $182,000?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 24 Apr 2012 14:43:03 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

If I'm paying out of pocket, it may be important to know. With insurance, are you going to shop around? You have a policy that states what you will pay, usually a fixed co-pay. It is the business of the insurance company to negotiate a price and that has nothing to do with your cost.
I see the statements from my providers. The amount billed and the amount paid are far different. I still pay the same out of pocket.
Other factors in choosing a hospital are your doctors. If the doctor you want to perform surgery is not a practicing physician at that facility, you rely on the staff docs. That may or may not be a good choice.
About 18 months ago, my wife went into the hospital for a simple outpatient procedure that would have released her by lunch time.. She came home a week later with a bill for about $80,000.
It is a complex situation that is not going to be cured with a simple price list.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have an HSA with a high deductible so it pays me to shop around when possible. There is a fairly large difference between docs even within Blue Cross' preferred provider base. Sorta surprised me.

--
People thought cybersex was a safe alternative,
until patients started presenting with sexually
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have regular insurance with a high deductible, though I even tried to find out what these procedures cost when I just had a small co-pay. Why waste even the insurance company's money. It's not free, anymore than government money is.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.