OT - Stormin, git yur gun

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On 11/26/2015 07:37 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

The idea after independence was to make Hindi the official language and phase out English in 20 years. However less than half the country speaks a language related to Hindi so they're officially bilingual.
I don't know if it's completely accurate but I'm reading a book about the Scandinavian countries where the author state if you go to a convention or meeting with Swedes, Norwegians, Danes, Finns, and Icelanders the Finns and Icelanders group together and converse in English while the other three muddle along in their mostly mutually intelligible languages.
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Per rbowman:

I just finished semi-binge-watching a Danish TV series called "Lilyhammer" about a NYC mob underboss that enters witness protection to save his life and chooses Lilyhammer, Norway as his new home.
Sort of a semi-dark comedy. Guy who plays the underboss was in The Sopranos too (Steven VanZandt)... not really an actor, more of a music composer/producer/performer - but, IMHO, quite entertaining in both of his movie roles.
One thing that caught my attention was the mixture of English and Norwegian - which your observation seems to explain.
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Pete Cresswell

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On 11/26/2015 01:34 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

I'm waiting for Netflix to cough up the Lilyhammer second and third seasons. I love how Little Stevie cuts through Norwegian political correctness. Wolf? No problem, let me get my .38.
Norwegian sounds to me like a mixture of English and German, at least Bokmal. I don't think I've ever hear Nynorsk.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TGVDNezzx38

The US series 'The Bridge' was based on the Danish/Swedish 'Bron/Broen' with the bridge being the Øresund Bridge. There are a few references to the problems of not quite understanding each other. The cast itself is mixed and one of the Swedes said she had been on a bus in Copenhagen and heard a teenage girl say 'skumfidus!' It immediately became her favorite Danish word -- marshmallow.
Then there's the problem that Danes can't understand Danish:
http://www.thelocal.dk/20150304/not-even-the-danes-can-understand-danish
I'm currently watching 'The Killing' that's a remake of 'Forbrydelsen' set in Seattle rather than Copenhagen.
Sometimes I wonder what happened to American creativity when so many movies and TV series are either remakes of US or European films.
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Per rbowman:

I gave that one a solid 3 stars.... enjoyed it and will probably watch it again sometime in the future.
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Pete Cresswell

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Per rbowman:

Did you see the Swedish version of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo ?
I saw the Swedish version first, then read the book in English, and then watched the American version in English.
The American version was ok.... but only "Ok"... no comparison to the Swedish version.
Noomie Rapace *made* the Swedish version - and she speaks perfect, unaccented English.... so I had to wonder why they did not get her for the American version..... but even with her in the lead role, the American version would not have stood up to the Swedish.... It just lacked the intricacies and nuances that the Swedish version had.
--
Pete Cresswell

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On 11/26/2015 06:10 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

I've seen Dragon Tattoo, Fire, and Hornet's Nest, all in the Swedish versions. I've never seen the American version. I wonder if 'The Girl in the Spider's Web' will make it to a movie. I've read mixed reviews but I think there is some discontent when Lagercrantz stepped in after Larsson died.
I've only seen some of the Wallander episodes in Swedish too, not the British remakes, and read a couple of Mankell's book. It's somehow apropos that the 'Faceless Killers' in 1991 theme revolve around immigration and its discontents.
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On 11/26/2015 8:37 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Can you read lips any?
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Maggie

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On 11/25/2015 9:28 PM, rbowman wrote:

I've noticed I'm getting fewer calls from India, lately.
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Christopher A. Young
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Per Stormin Mormon:

Or they are working harder on perfecting their accents..... -)
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Pete Cresswell

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On 11/26/2015 07:38 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Most Indians that you run into do well with English and I've gotten used to the accent over the years. It beats working class Yorkshire, which I'm not sure is even modern English.
The joke is if an American is having trouble making himself understood he speaks louder. I think the default for some ESL people is to speak faster. If you're not sure about some of the twisted English constructions, just skip over them really fast.
That sort of works in German; d' lets you slide over exactly what gender a water cooler is.
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Per rbowman:

When I was at a family reunion in Wells, Somerset, UK, I found myself in the village standing next to two local character types talking in what I guess was a local dialect.
To cut to the chase, I could not even begin to understand what they were saying.... And I was *trying*.... and these were my people, so-to-speak.
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Pete Cresswell

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On 11/26/2015 3:38 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Can't resist. We have a lot in the US. Some call them black people.
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On 11/26/2015 4:18 PM, Frank wrote:

Yo bee mofo mofo, know ahm sa-in? RAY-sist. :)
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Christopher Afro. Young
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On 11/26/2015 01:38 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Wookiee, had to be Wookiee... They live in the Mendip Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Google maps might not be doing it justice but I'm missing the outstanding part.
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Per rbowman:

You mean "Wookiee" are a group of people ?
I know there are places called "Wookey Hole" and "Wookey Hole Caves" near Wells, but did not know that "Wookiee" or "Wookey" were a group of people.
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Pete Cresswell

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On 11/26/2015 06:14 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Not a 'Star Wars' fan I take it? I've only seen a couple of them but that's enough to know Chewbacca is a Wookiie from the planet Kashyyyk. I think Wookey Hole probably was there first.
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Per rbowman:

At the major-league mutual fund where I used to work it seemed like the workforce was divided about evenly between English-speakers, Hindi/Urdu-speakers, and Mandarin-speakers.
I always preferred to have people in the second two groups near my desk.
If two people are going on-and-on in English, it messes up my concentration.... some little part of my mind can't stop parsing every word they say.
OTOH, if they are going on-and-on in Hindi, Urdu, or Mandarin; it's just background noise to me and does not interfere with my concentration.
Score 1 point for diversity....
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Pete Cresswell

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On 11/26/2015 07:33 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

As long as they stay with one language. I've seen Bollywood movies like 'Monsoon Wedding' where the dialog can switch from English to Hindi to English or vice versa in one sentence. I don't think that's uncommon for upper middle class Indians.
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Per rbowman:

During a miss-ent youth in Hawaii, I knew some kids from Algeria who had lived in an apartment building where seven languages were spoken.
This kids would stand around mixing I-don't-even-know-what languages in jokes so that a word in one language sounded like a word in another language.... it all went over my head, but they would laugh their butts off at some of the things they came up with.
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Pete Cresswell

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On 11/26/2015 01:41 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

James Joyce managed to get an incomprehensible novel or two out of that. Maybe the kids were onto something.
Phuc Dat Bich turned out to be a hoax but I imagine Kim Phuc has had her share of problems with people dealing with her name.
http://abcnews.go.com/International/vietnamese-woman-burned-napalm-treated-40-years/story?id4739193
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