OT - snow far

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On 1/23/2016 6:44 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Worst is over now. I was concerned that I might not be able to make pizza but power has been staying on. On-line paper said they had to close the refinery about 20 miles away because of outage.
Next door neighbor and family are in Puerto Rico for sons wedding and we're watching another neighbors house while they are in India. They're smarter than us.
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On 1/23/2016 7:26 PM, Frank wrote:

Aren't Puerto Rico and India tropical climates? I bet they'd be frozen solid if they were in the storm.
My congrats to the PR bride and groom. May they have a life of bliss and chocolates.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
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On 1/23/2016 7:48 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Their part of India is somewhat tropical.
Puerto Rican climate appears really nice with 80 degree summers and 70 degree winters.
Work brought them both to the US. Indian friend and coworker has been here over 50 years going to grad school here. PR folks wife got transferred here from chemical industry there.
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She's obviously a beneficiary of blond privilege.
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Per Stormin Mormon:

Don't anybody let my wife know, but part of me was just a *little* disappointed that there was no power failure and I didn't get to play with my generator toys.... -)
--
Pete Cresswell

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On 1/24/2016 9:15 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

You still can. No law against it.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
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<stuff snipped>

Only 16" east of DC. Nearly twice as much on the western side of the city. This is the typical heat island effect where the storm "splits" and tends to move north or south of the city. I suspect that's why Micky, living IIRC in the South Baltimore area, got whacked with 36" of snow. I think he got some extra that had been headed my way! Thanks, Micky, for taking the hit for me!
The drifting left some places at way over 36" (like my front porch) and I couldn't open my storm door. The local juvenile delinquent shoveled me out (for $50 but it was worth every cent). Only major problem was that the city plows left a mountain in front of my driveway that they promise to remove RSN. I was surprised when an complaint email I sent was answered within 20 minutes asking for the address (which I neglected to put in the email).
--
Bobby G.



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On Sunday, January 24, 2016 at 2:43:29 AM UTC-5, Robert Green wrote:

They come back and clear your EOD? Wow! We are basically on our own. The plow makes 2 passes up my short street. Because of the configuration of my neighborhood, they make a pass heading west, which puts mounds in front of the houses on the north side of the street. Then they make a U turn and come back, putting a mound on the south side. If I happen to be out shoveling or blowing at the time, the driver will sometimes slow and dip his blow into the mound at my EOD and move what he can.
How long does it take for them to come back if you "complain"? If everyone complained, how would they get anything done? You can't just fly by when you are clearing EOD piles. It takes a lot longer to finesse them out of the way without tearing up lawns, taking out poles, etc. at least where I live.
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<stuff snipped>
You can't give me a setup like this and not have me go for it:

There's an awful lot of blowing going on in that sentence. Now I have to clean my monitor. (-"
(And in answer to your question several county trucks came by, stopped at the mound and then drove on so I am not sure what's going to happen eventually. The mountain still blocks my driveway and now my neighbor's stuck his truck into the big pile making any moving of it impossible!)
--
Bobby G.



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On Sunday, January 24, 2016 at 11:20:02 PM UTC-5, Robert Green wrote:

Typos sure can add fun to a post. ;-)

My question was more general in nature. Do they usually come back and clear your EOD or are you on your own in most cases? Was this the first time you emailed them about the issue? Just curious...
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Yes, they do!

at

clear

Each storm has been different but this is the first one where they dumped a huge mountain of snow at the end of the driveway. Their policy is to first clear a single lane and then they come back and try to clear more. This was the first time I ever had to email them and though I got an email response almost immediately, nothing's happened.
Usually, since my street starts with an "A" we are the first to be plowed out, usually way ahead of everyone I know. So I really can't complain. I actually could get out through my neighbor's plowed out driveway which is separated from mine by a narrow strip of lawn. I think they realized that and dropped me to the bottom of the list because there are others who don't have a similar option and are still snowed in. I have friends whose streets have YET to see a plow.
It's not like it was in Buffalo where two feet of snow is a minor inconvenience and people know how to drive in it and to stay home if they don't have to be out. I left Buffalo after they had 93" of mostly lake effect snow in a single year. I had to jump out of the 2nd floor window with plywood boards strapped to my feet so I could shovel the drifts that had piled up against the storm door which opened outwards. I remember thinking as I leapt whether the boards would hold me up or I would sink like a stone into the snow.
--
Bobby G.



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On 1/26/2016 9:38 AM, Robert Green wrote:

Do you really think that is true? Aardvark street gets preference over Underwood street?
The streets department has a plan in place that does not take street names into consideration. It has much to do with what is on the route, hospitals, fire house, steep hills, etc. Nor to plow drivers assess the driveway of individual houses to see if they have an alternative way out.
The areas hardest hit with this last storm are in areas that usually get moderate snowfall, thus they don't have the equipment to take on 20+ inches and clear it all in hours.
On the news last night a woman from Queens was complaining about the lack of plowed streets. She said they were last because they were black. I'm sure Manhattan, a major financial hub for the world, gets priority over Queens.
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plowed

I

is

that

don't

streets

I know it's true because I know people in the neighborhood north (B to Z) of me and that's the way they do it here. They collect the trash in the same pattern. The streets are aphabetically ordered with the first bank being one syllable names ("A" street) the next tier get two syllables, "Alpha" street, the third "Apache" street, etc. It sucks to live on Zinnia St. for sure.

Not sure how you can say that without interviewing them, but I've had more than one truck stop, look at the mound and move on. That's consistent with my reporting the problem and them deciding upon exception it's not bad enough to warrant time moving it. I'll ask these questions of the public works manager after the cleanup's complete.
I am pretty sure from where they've dumped the snow piles that they DO take into consideration who they are blocking. They didn't block my neighbors who were shoveling out the day it snowed and they reported to me that they asked the driver not to block my driveway. Can't verify that, of course, but in general the drivers move the snow to the closest out of the way place they can find. On my street there's not much space to move it to. Since I wasn't even starting to dig out at that point, I got the prize.

inches and clear it all in hours.
They made that clear on their website - it would take days before "special problems" like mine would be addressed as there are more important "targets" to clear completely.

And as you noted, so do public buildings and other priority locations although most hospitals I know of have their own snow-clearing equipment and don't depend on contractors or the government because they're not reliable enough. Some buildings do depend on contractors, like my friend's apartment complex that was so socked in that the managers said they would pay for a cab for any resident who was still snowed in and couldn't drive. This kind of storm strains resources to the max. Luckily we got a completely unexpected "practice storm" the night before that woke them all up.
--
Bobby G.



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Per Robert Green:

Mound of snow ? You want to see a mound of snow?
Here's what they do to the sidewalks in Paoli PA: http://tinyurl.com/hh5kj8v http://tinyurl.com/js343tv
The first one is at least six feet high and right at the spot where the sidewalk meets Russell road.
The second one is the other side of that intersection where they plow all the crap from the road up on to the sidewalk.
I have been clearing this and the pathways through the park for 10+ years, but I'm getting old and this year I posted an appeal the local civic association to make it more of a team sport.... and then said "The Hell With It"....
Granted I have something of a woodie for governments in general.... authority issues maybe... but I think any normal person has to wonder what kind of mind does stuff like this.
It's not the workers. Workers have supervisors. Supervisors have managers. Managers make policy, create plans, and monitor compliance with same.... So it's whatever passes for management locally.
--
Pete Cresswell

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On Tuesday, January 26, 2016 at 9:52:48 AM UTC-5, Robert Green wrote:

When I was stationed in Alaska (USCG) the 1 & 1.5 story buildings would get buried on the windward side. Inside, the heat from the building would melt a "cave", complete with stalagmites and stalagmites made of ice. We'd shine flashlights though the window and get all sorts of cool (npi) pictures. The caves lasted all winter and changed as the season went on.
Outside, we would ski off of the roofs with cross country skies (fairly safe) or with seal skin slippers we'd buy from the Eskimos (not very safe at all).
When you first buy the slippers the hair is still on the bottom, pointed towards the heel. It eventually wears off down to the skin, but while the hair is there, they are slicker than snot. You've seen seals sliding across the snow, so you can imagine how slick the slippers are, especially on a snow covered hill.
Skiing with them is really dumb and a heck of a lot of fun. As long as you are bundled up in full arctic gear, the falls don't hurt so much. The beer helps to cushion the falls also.
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news:08b20439-d195-48d2-b495-
<stuff snipped>

are

helps

I had a friend who always took two percocets before skiing. His reasoning was he knew he was going to hurt himself and he didn't want to wait for the pain meds to kick in when he did.
--
Bobby G.



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On Tuesday, January 26, 2016 at 12:54:13 PM UTC-5, Robert Green wrote:

Preventive maintenance. Smart!
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<stuff snipped>

reasoning

the

Except that I always suspected he fell down a lot more when loaded up with Percs. He gave up skiing after he fractured his leg so badly the bone was sticking out. I'll bet those Percs helped on that occasion.
--
Bobby G.



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On Tuesday, January 26, 2016 at 5:55:19 PM UTC-5, Robert Green wrote:

It probably helped twice, before and after.
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On Tue, 26 Jan 2016 09:41:14 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Back in the late seventies and eighties we got some storms up around Stratford Ontario that drifted snow to the level of the roof at the local Toyota dealer. Some of the guys went to work with their snowmobiles and parked on the roof.
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