OT Safety Deposit Box (at a bank)

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I have used HD Clone with great results:
http://www.miray.de/products/sat.hdclone.html
It looks like they have made many improvements since I last used it, so I might have to check it out again.
I normally use Macrium Reflect for day to day image backups.
Anthony
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I used Partition Magic because it would do a lot more, but others have had good luck with Ghost.
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I believe that the law and banking procedures changed in the last couple of years so checks clear almost immediately, electronically, without having to ship checks across the country to be manually entered and cleared.
So it no longer works to draw checks on far-away banks, as far as clearing goes. (when it comes to your own bank giving you credit for the funds, that's a different story as I don't know if that law has changed, but that's an issue for the recipient of the funds, not the payer)
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On Sat, 5 Mar 2011 19:35:29 -0800 (PST), Shaun Eli

That has been true for a very long time. The bank does a "capture" run on the checks as soon as they can get them to the processing center (the same day for sure) and that run sends the MICR data to the fed to clear the check by about 9PM local time By Midnight EST/EDT al the checks that were captured are cleared.
There is a huge stink if the bank has sorter trouble and does not make capture. It costs them the interest on that money for a day.
Yet they still tell you an out of state takes 2 weeks to clear or whatever they can get away with but they are sitting on the money. The only time this may really be true is if there is some kind of fraud and they don't spot it right away but I bet that still happens in 24 hours.
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On 3/5/2011 10:15 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Older versions of Ghost, yes, as long as the drives involved are small enough for it to deal with. (I still have a copy in my toolkit, and use it for cloning XP boxes.) The later Ghost, after they got eaten by Norton/Symantec, not so much. Big and bloated and much more complex to use. I don't think it was even the same program- they just bought the name because of the good rep it had, and stuck it on their own inferior programming.
--
aem sends...

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On Sat, 05 Mar 2011 09:17:21 -0600, Tom Cantwell

If you have a Maxtor/Seagate drive anywhere in your system here is a clone drive utility on MaxBlast tools and if you are a W/D guy it is in the Data Lifeguard tools (the one you get with a "retail" pack drive)
I use Max Blast and if that system doesn't have a Maxtor in it I just plug one in. The software just needs to see it. You don't actually have to use it for anything. It could probably be dead as long as it is still alive enough to report when the software polls it.
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On Mar 1, 6:47pm, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Bob R) wrote:

The boxes take two keys to open it. If the bank doesn't have your key they have to hire a locksmith to come in and drill out the old lock and re-key the box. That's the reason for the hefty key deposit that you get back if you close our your box and bring your keys back.
-C-
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when you die the bank locks the safety deposit box untill a tax collector can be present at opening. the tax man gets a shot at you even when dead.....
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I don't know how the tax man gets involved, but they do. My mother had a box, dad knew of it,but did not have anything to do with it. Mother was a book keeper and did all the financal stuff. Dad did not even know how to write a check. He was plenty smart enough, but just did not have any interist in the finances of the family. I had to handle all the estate planning after mom died.
When mom died , the box was 'sealed' and I had to wait on the tax man. The only thing in it was a few hundred dollars of old coins. Decided to call it a coin collection and assigned a value to it.
Whatever you do, do not put a will in the box. Also do not put anything in it that you may need for a month after the person dies. It may not take that long, but it could to get the tax man to the box.
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The trick is to plan ahead and get to the bank the same or next day after the death. That assumes you have a key and authorization.
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The banks read the obits. Get to the bank before the obit hits the papers and clean out the box.
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you can be criminally proscuted for that
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The feds find out from the mortuary. When a death certificate is filed for anyone past Social Security age it is federal law to send a copy to the government. I know my mom's SS deposits were debited back, prorated to the exact day she died and I never said a word to anyone.
They did not talk to me about the bank tho, probably because it was a joint account that we both used. I did enough to show activity. It is really not a bad way to handle family business. If she wants me to buy something for her, I write the check from the joint account and I she buys something for me I deposit into the account.
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On 3/2/2011 12:43 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

The state finds out first when the department of vital statistics (or whatever it is called in that state) is notified. Info has to be correct because the body cannot be disposed of (buried-cremated) until they verify it.

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An Obit does not remove the legal entitlement made earlier for the second person to "access the box at any time". It's set up as an either/or where one can enter, or both are required, just like bank check signature cards. If there were a restriction that TWO people could only share one key and one box, then there's a requirement that the TWO renters be present, be alive, and match the signatures. There is a stipulation that can be enacted before the issuance of the keys as to whether or not one or both parties MUST be present. In case of a dual access signature requirement, the bank would not legally let the ONE person into the box without the OTHER being present and signing, and the box would be sealed pending legal action. The attempted entrance would be legally and officially noted in the bank record. If the bank allowed the ONE person into the box without the presence and signature of the other IF PREVIOUSLY STIPULATED, they would have the liability.
But you knew that, right?
SteveB
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On Tue, 1 Mar 2011 17:32:40 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

That all depends on how the box is rented and how bank accounts are held. My mother and I were joint account holders and when she died nothing at the bank changed at all. I was still able to get to the money and access the box without any IRS intervention. I finally gave them the keys back and stopped renting the box because I never used it. All I needed to do to get her name off of the account was show a copy if the death certificate.
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wrote:

He may or may-not have said that in jest. Technically it is true. In fact it rarely happens that way.
You have to trust the bank, and observe their rules.
My niece has a key. When they find me cold, she will open the box, find instructions on what to do with all my stuff. It is often that simple, unless the IRS has a tail on you or some-such.
P
"Law Without Equity Is No Law At All. It Is A Form Of Jungle Rule."
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Or unless one of the heirs beats feet to a lawyer and puts a freeze on everything.
Which has been known to happen.
Steve
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(Bob R) wrote:

The banks monitor the death notices every day and are required by law to secure the box (no entry) on the death of either boxholder.
The box may not be opened except in the presence of the tax auditor. At that time a list of the contents must be made for tax purposes.
That is the law here and I would guess, all states.
Colbyt
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On 3/2/2011 7:45 AM, Colbyt wrote: ...

It certainly isn't _exactly_ the law in all states, no. As noted elsewhere, the law is different in different states and at least those w/ which I'm familiar depend on the status of the lessee(s) of the box as well as potential other circumstances.
One size does _NOT_ fit all, iow...
--
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