OT Postage

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Phisherman wrote:

I use in excess of 100 stamps a month. What do I do? And it's not enough to get bulk rate.
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netnews wrote:

If you cannot use free electronic "bill pay" then the answer is... Only buy "Forever" stamps! They can be used without additional postage when stamp rates rise!
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The biggest problem is that first class postage is no longer based soley on weight. The USPS went dimensional a few years ago, so now you can have a one ounce letter that requires one of four different rates: (.42/.62/.83/1.17). Five, if you include a first class postcard.
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Chatting with our little cow-ville postmaster I asked how many pages could be put in an envelope for the cost of one stamp. He said that he didn't know so we did an experiment. From the outset you have to assume that none of the sheets of 8.5" x 11" paper is any heavier than that found in a copier machine. At the end of stacking pages on his scale we came up with 8 sheets of paper. That's what we have gone by for several years now and only flunked once, that I can recall. I love those little things that simplify life or are, at least, handy. One more example: The span from the outer edge of my little finger across my outstretched hand to the outer edge of my thumb is 7 7/8" - good enough to call it 8" and make a ballpark measurement.
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Just put it on your weed scale.
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Triple-beam, eh?
Now, where's that grams to ounce conversion table...
--
:)
JR

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Once again, Google is your friend. Many don't know you can just type any conversion request into the Google search bar and it does it. It does just about anything.
1 oz to grams
1 ounce = 28.3495231 grams
I tried:     nickel bag to grams but it didn't fly.
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-snip-

They'd need to work in an inflation calculator for that to work. A 1960s nickel weighed a lot more than today's. [and a 1969s Vietnamese 'nickel' weighed nearly an ounce. . . or so I've heard.<g>]
Jim
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If the letters are identical weight, the cheapest way to pay postage is with a permit imprint. Postage meters are handy for flats and packages.
It's all about image. Someone who works out of his home, sending no more than a handful of business letters a day, may use a postage meter to give the impression to his correspondents that he employs a large staff. On the other hand, an impersonal marketing campaign makes the envelopes more personal by using stamps. The additional expense of applying stamps works (not to mention that you've probably paid for postage well in advance of the mailing) because it gets a few more potential customers to open the envelope.
Nothing says "bulk rate" and therefore "junk mail" like a permit imprint.
Permit imprint mailings have another advantage: If you really want to pay for postage at the last minute, you can do it as late as the time you present the mailing. Although permit users often use advance deposit accounts.
Postage meter companies make more money by taking money in advance than in meter rental fees. They also charge customers fees to give them their money in advance! Those postage-by-phone and by-Internet recharges are also profitable.
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