[OT] Pink RV antifreeze in car radiator

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On Monday, September 21, 2015 at 12:28:44 AM UTC-4, Tony Hwang wrote:

IDK what the actual boiling point difference is, but seems like that could be a valid point, if the RV type has a lower boiling point. Also, as someone else pointed out, auto antifreeze has specific corrosion and lubricating properties that RV probably would not have. I would think the corrosion inhibitors required might be toxic and/or not needed in the RV product. Someone said it would probably be OK if only a little is used. I would disagree with that. Years ago I had a Pontiac that had the extended life, 100K mile antifreeze in it. I took it for service to Jiffy Lube and they topped it off with regular. It wound up fouling, gunky up the cooling system and creating a big mess that the dealer had to fix.
Putting RV type in a car would probably be like using cooking oil for engine oil or at least like putting some straight weight oil without proper detergents, additives, etc in it. If I were in some emergency situation, with no other choice for some odd reason, I'd use it temporarily.
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"trader_4" <

At the museum in Flin Flon Manitoba there is an old tractor on display and they used kerosene in the cooling system! Apparently they had no antifreeze at all back then so they used that instead.
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On Monday, September 21, 2015 at 9:49:51 AM UTC-5, Phil Kangas wrote:

Before anti-freeze they would normally use alcohol in winter...which would boil away quickly.
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trader_4 wrote:

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On 9/21/2015 11:12 AM, Tony Hwang wrote:

Winter approaches, and will force me to either repair, replace, or feed it auto antifreeze.
Right now, exploring the options.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
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On Monday, September 21, 2015 at 2:14:07 PM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Antifreeze has corrosion inhibitors and lubricating properties. I made the mistake once of running a car with pure water, because I was in between repairs, waiting for a part, or whatever. Ran it like that for a couple weeks, the thermostat froze up. When I drained it, I was shocked at how rusty and dirty the water was.
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On 9/21/2015 4:15 PM, trader_4 wrote:

Do you have high mineral content in your water?
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Tuesday, September 22, 2015 at 8:20:02 AM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I don't think it's particularly high, no. It's from a municipal water source and I don't have any of the typical problems you'd notice from hard water.
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On Sunday, September 20, 2015 at 5:28:22 PM UTC-7, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Phone Prestone because they're good with that kind of information.
RV water line antifreeze is made with propylene glycol instead of ethylene glycol because the former is less toxic, as this note from the CDC says:
http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/csem/csem.asp?csem &po
Less toxic, not non-toxic, but at least unlike ethylene glycol:
"Large doses and unusual circumstances are necessary for the development of propylene glycol toxicity."
"Unlike ethylene glycol, propylene glycol does not produce nephrotoxicity [kidney failure] in humans."
Straight from the bottle, RV antifreeze is typically 25% propylene glycol, 75% water, and that's it -- no additives to help stop corrosion or counteract hard water.
If you have a crack in a plastic radiator tank, about the only way to fix it well is by melting new identical plastic into the crack because no glue or stop leak will work. The plastic is almost always nylon with glass fibers mixed into it (radiator supplies and GM dealers have rods of this), and you need to melt identical nylon (there are several types) into the crack with a hot air gun (not a regular heat gun but a pinpoint one -- Harbor Freight sells plastic welding irons and guns, $15 - $65), soldering iron, or woodburning iron (latter has nonstick Teflon or ceramic coated tip). You first clean off the crack and melt a fairly deep groove into it.
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