OT: Ping Bod. Please translate

Hi Bod,
We have been watching your cops shows again. The slang term for an informant is a "grass", as in your lawn.
I can't find any good explanation on the web, so I thought I'd ask you where it comes from.
-T
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On 12/04/2016 09:07, T wrote:

The first known use of "grass" in that context is Arthur Gardner's crime novel Tinker's Kitchen, published in 1932, in which a "grass" is defined as "an informer". The origin of the term "grass" being used as signifying a traitor, a person who informs on people he or she knows intimately, ostensibly can be traced to the expression "snake in the grass," which has a similar meaning. The phrase derives from the writings of Virgil (in Latin, latet anguis in herba) and has been known in the English language, meaning "traitor," since the late 17th century.
Hope this helps.
--
Bod

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On 04/12/2016 01:31 AM, Bod wrote:

Makes much more sense now. Thank you!
Wish you guys made more Foyle's War.
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On 12/04/2016 17:18, T wrote:

:-)
--
Bod

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