OT - PBS Special - "Super Skyscrapers"

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On Wed, 5 Feb 2014 22:56:29 -0500, "Robert Green"

Hey, that's the year of the Declaration of Independance. What a coincidence!
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wrote:

Yep, a real "coinkydink!" (-:
Here's an interesting test: Fill in the ages of the various people associated with the American Revolution as of the year 1776:
Marquis de Lafayette James Monroe Gilbert Stuart Aaron Burr Alexander Hamilton Betsy Ross James Madison Thomas Jefferson John Adams Paul Revere George Washington Samuel Adams
Scroll down for the answers. Source:
http://kottke.org/13/08/the-surprising-ages-of-the-founding-fathers-on-july-4-1776
|v |v |v |v |v |v |v |v |v |v |v
Marquis de Lafayette, 18 James Monroe, 18 Gilbert Stuart, 20 Aaron Burr, 20 Alexander Hamilton, 21 Betsy Ross, 24 James Madison, 25 Thomas Jefferson, 33 John Adams, 40 Paul Revere, 41 George Washington, 44 Samuel Adams, 53
--
Bobby G. minus 176



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On 2/7/14 11:18 AM, Robert Green wrote:

And now the Feds think it's ok for "kids" to mooch off of their parents' insurance until the ripe old age of 26.
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Back then I assume a LOT of people never even made it to age 26. I had no idea that some of the Founding Fathers were hardly old enough to BE fathers.
--
Bobby G.

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On 2/8/14 1:46 PM, Robert Green wrote:

It's remarkable how much they knew with the little technology the had for education. Granted, they were probably the cream of the crop but those were some sharp people. Maybe they were better off not having American Idol as a distraction.
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On 2/5/2014 9:56 PM, Robert Green wrote:

I can't picture 1800 fpm. It is the same as 20.5 mph. Hard to imagine how they move an elevator that fast.
I don't think they have used rivets for a long time.
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1800 is going down, Going up it's 5 fpm.

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<stuff snipped>

I heard that they had to wait until an elevator full of people needed to go down to act as a counterweight that lifted the elevator occupants at the ground floor. <humor alert>
--
bg



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They made a big point of the speed and said that the "follow on trades" couldn't keep up with just the outside hoist, which ran very slowly. So as soon as they could, they got the internal elevators working.

I don't build too many skyscrapers so it was news to me! (-: It reminded me of a story in one of my journalism text books about writing "feature" stories. The article described how riveters (in the old days, I guess) use to toss hot rivets around from where they were heated to where they were hammered in just using coffee cans as catcher's mitts. When asked what would happen if he dropped a red-hot rivet to the streets below the rivet jockey said "Well, he's not *supposed* to drop it!"
--
Bobby G.




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On Sat, 8 Feb 2014 14:51:21 -0500, "Robert Green"

You can see scenes of riveters tossing rivets in a couple movies from the 30's and maybe the late 40's.

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wrote:

http://www.google.com/search?q=bolting+rather+than+riveting+skyscrapers
leads to a lot of interesting hits.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rivet
says:
<<Until relatively recently, structural steel connections were either welded or riveted. High-strength bolts have largely replaced structural steel rivets. Indeed, the latest steel construction specifications published by AISC (the 14th Edition) no longer covers their installation. The reason for the change is primarily due to the expense of skilled workers required to install high strength structural steel rivets. Whereas two relatively unskilled workers can install and tighten high strength bolts, it takes a minimum of four highly skilled riveters to install rivets in one joint at a time.>> Plus, the occasional red hot rivet hitting a pedestrian had to raise the costs. (-:
Here's something else about rivets v. bolts I did not know:
<The stress and shear in a rivet is analyzed like a bolted joint. However, it is not wise to combine rivets with bolts and screws in the same joint. Rivets fill the hole where they are installed to establish a very tight fit (often called interference fit). It is difficult or impossible to obtain such a tight fit with other fasteners. The result is that rivets in the same joint with loose fasteners carry more of the load-they are effectively more stiff. The rivet can then fail before it can redistribute load to the other loose fit fasteners like bolts and screws. This often causes catastrophic failure of the joint when the fasteners unzip. In general, a joint composed of similar fasteners is the most efficient because all fasteners reach capacity simultaneously.>
The article describes the process of riveting in the old days:
<<At a central location near the areas being riveted, a furnace was set up. Rivets were placed in the furnace and heated to a glowing hot temperature. The Rivet warmer or heater used tongs to individually remove rivets and throw them to a catcher stationed near the joints to be riveted. The catcher usually caught the rivet in a leather bucket with an ash lined bottom then placed the glowing hot rivet into the hole to be riveted, and quickly turned around to await the next rivet. The "Holder up or holder on" would then hold a heavy rivet set or dolly or another (larger) pnuematic hammer against the round head of the rivet, while the Riveter (or sometimes two riveters)applied a pneumatic rivet hammer to the unformed head, making it mushroom tightly against the joint in its final domed shape. Upon cooling, the rivet contracted and exerted further force, tightening the joint.>>
--
Bobby G.



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On Wednesday, February 5, 2014 7:56:29 PM UTC-8, Robert Green wrote:

There's a very tall building in, I think, Shanghai, that uses that principle, but it is ROUNDED. Astonishingly graceful.
HB

It IS in re-runs, but definitely worth seeing again.
Anyone interested in how things are built will enjoy it.
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news:8947afdd-29e3-4843-ab61- <stuff snipped>

The design for the new One World Trade Center uses a square base that transforms into a square top that's rotated like a 8 point star. Very easy to see how it works with a computer animation, harder to show in a still photo:
http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/new-artist-renderings-new-world-trade-center-unveiled-article-1.1131141
(Published: Tuesday, August 7, 2012, 8:07 PM - old, but it makes the design quite clear)
A lot of reviews panned the design but I think it's pretty elegant. It's easy to like a building after watching how hard the people worked to build it and how much of their heart went into it.
--
Bobby G.





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