OT Paying by credit card over the phone

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My niece needs some auto parts. I called Advanced Auto Parts. They need the money before they can order the parts from the factory (Ford). Cool........I have a 15k limit on my card. Ready for my card number? Well we have to have you come down here and bring the card to order it. What? Well.......this is a part that comes from the dealer. We have to get you to come in to pay for it.
I can only guess they suspect foul play. Anyone else get turned down for trying to order over the phone?
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LOL...
@Metspitzer:
Ask any one of your friends who might run a business where the public purchases things from them that accepts a credit card as payment...
Transactions which are non-swiped cost the business double what swiped transactions cost... 2% of the transaction total vs 4%...
Apparently the Auto Parts store didn't want to pay 4% of the total sale on a special order...
With retail business being sluggish, every penny adds up...
This is why some businesses still take imprints of the credit cards, it proves the card was present at the time of sale...
~~ Evan
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On Tue, 8 Nov 2011 16:28:33 -0800 (PST), Evan

That is a very good reason.
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On 11/8/2011 16:28, Evan wrote:

In the past ten years the only businesses I have had take credit card imprints have been hotels. I use a secure or virtual account number to guarantee the reservation, but they have never honored it at the desk unless the reservation included prepayment.
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Sounds to me like you haven't dealt with a small enough business, the big chain stores use electronic capture of signature of the person using the card as well as store CCTV footage to document who made the purchase rather than keeping a printed copy of the receipt on file in the store for the required retention period...
Smaller stores still imprint the card, especially when the card doesn't swipe and the numbers had to be punched in manually, as the card is either swiped or imprinted to prove it was there at the time of purchase... Smaller stores also still deal with keeping extra copies of the receipts on file in case of a charge back during the retention period...
LOL... Using a "secure" or "virtual" account number to do anything where you have to reserve something is stupid, as the virtual account number won't match your name and address like the info on your actual real account will, hotels tend to like knowing the real name of the person reserving the room in case of a no show as they have the information to send the bill -- this is why your attempts at anonymous reservations with a credit card that didn't match the name you reserved under were not honored without payment of a deposit...
~~ Evan
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Evan wrote:

Here in Canada we've had a small chip on our credit cards for about 2 years now. About 75% of the retailers I go to (big box, grocery stores, restaurants, etc) have chip-enabled readers where you slide in the card and enter a 4-digit pin to complete the transaction. This replaces the requirement to sign anything, and the cashier doesn't ask to see the card (let alone take an imprint of it).
I believe that if 3 incorrect attempts are made to enter the PIN within a short span of time that the card is automatically disabled.
At gas pumps here in Canada, when you slide in your credit card to pay at the pump, we don't have to enter our zip-code (or postal code in our case) to complete the transaction, which is something you have to do at many pumps in the US (or at least in california).
At some pumps here, I don't even have to slide my card into a reader - just wave it near a small panel on the pump marked with a "wavy" logo that indicates some sort of RF transciever (this is NOT speed-pass).
I understand that Europe also has CC's with chip-and-pin.
But the US is being backwards about this by not introducing credit cards with "chip-and-pin" technology. You should ask your banks and credit card companies why they prefer to soak you with high fees and interest rates as a way to pay for CC fraud rather than impliment technology to reduce fraud.

I've never heard of the use of a secure or virtual account number. How does that work? I assume by virtual account number you mean a credit-card number that is different than the one embossed on your real card. ?
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Careful - your northern superiority complex is showing. Chip & Pin got a foothold in Europe because of the poor and expensive phone systems that were in place at the time. Credit card companies needed a secure and sure way of validating a translation without having to make an expensive phone call.
Meanwhile, in the US ubiquitous and inexpensive local phone calls made it possible to roll out cash registers, vending machines, gas pumps and cheap validation terminals all across the country. The sheer number of terminals in the US is several orders of magnitude larger than in Canada. The cost of replacing all those terminals would ultimately be passed on to the consumer - an expense the US isn't in a particular hurry to take on.
That said, Visa has announced plans to support Chip & Pin in the US for those banks that want to issue those cards. They'll be available in a year or so.
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wrote:

I liked the chip and pin in Europe. As I did the wireless portable terminals they have, so my credit card never left my sight. IIRC, they had them in a local Legal Sea Foods restaurant (Garden State Mall, Paramus, NJ) now also.
--
Best regards
Han
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On 11/09/11 09:26 am, Han wrote:

At a restaurant in Canada a few years back they entered our order into a wireless terminal, then did the cc processing the same way.
I've also seen the wireless cc terminals used by itinerant vendors at flea markets and the like.
Perce
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The Apple store does that here. And one of the carwashes has them hanging off their belts.
--
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Robert Neville wrote:

Hmm, I'll say. Europe and SE Asia started using card chip and PIN almost 10 years ago. Small business still does not want to use POS machine which handles chip and PIN processing. This machine costs more that old swipe and sign one. Lazy Canucks are known to use most debit and CC in the world at an extra cost(service charge). We seniors get break on that part on our bank account.
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Robert Neville wrote:


Careful - your southern ignorance is showing.
Go and read this:
http://www.bankrate.com/finance/credit-cards/are-chip-and-pin-credit-cards-coming-1.aspx
And then tell me where your crack-pot European "poor and expensive phone system" theory factors into this story.
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These are RFID chips that can be read by anyone standing near you and if they watch you key in your PIN, you have been compromised.
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wrote:

We do have credit cards with RFID chips if you ask for them, you just wave it close to the merchant's terminal, however, the chipped cards being discussed have a gold contact patch on the face that must contact with the merchant's terminal by inserting the card into a slot. Nearly all credit cards are being changed over to this type with an auxiliary magnetic stripe on the back. This is not a RF type of chip.
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wrote:

Indeed this is NOT an RFID chip. That is in the tap and go cards, whatever there name is. I've had a Dutch card like that for ages. Great in Europe. Here in the US the mag stripe works fine.
--
Best regards
Han
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I did - and didn't see anything that contradicted what I posted. This statement in particular was interesting:
"For American card issuers, the cost of implementing the new system may be prohibitive, says Coleman."

I explained the origins of chip & pin and why it isn't generally available in the US today. What exactly do you disagree with?.
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wrote:

Why couldn't they just use a pin with the stripe card? It works fine with debit cards.. What does the chip have to do with it other than being slightly harder to duplicate?
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in wrote:

I believe that some things like balance remaining/available get written to the chip, so less info has to be transmitted over the data lines. The whole chip thing was said (somewhere) to be much more secure and theft proof.
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IFF you trust the cryptography. It makes little sense with cheap communications, though.
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On Wed, 09 Nov 2011 20:41:13 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Nothing, other than all CC terminals would need PIN entry capability. This could be a problem with restaurants, for example.

The chip allows off-line use, important for the early European market (20 years ago). As noted above, not so much in the US. The two systems started apart, for good reason, and the cost to change either exceeds any benefit.
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