OT - One Of These Things Is Not Like The Other

While looking at an apartment for my daughter, I ran across this in the basement of a rental property. It apparently belongs to the upstairs tenant.
It is my understanding that these 2 items are not supposed to be mixed. ;-)
https://imgur.com/40SeLPU
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On Mon, 27 Jun 2016 07:10:19 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Where is the bait?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m8gcz0tDKPg

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On Monday, June 27, 2016 at 11:15:34 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I think he just shoots the fish. ;-)
But seriously, 2 questions:
1 - Is it legal for a private citizen to possess that much ammo in a private home? 2 - What would happen if there was a fire in that basement?
It's my understanding that the tenant used to be a board member at a Trap/ Skeet/Clay Shooting club that folded. Apparently that is all of the ammo that was left over. There was also a workbench set up with gun cleaning equipment, so he must still be active to some extent.
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On 6/27/2016 12:58 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

My initial reaction is that it looked a bit like the trunk of my car when I last went to hunting camp.
The ammo is safe to possess and store and in a fire will add fuel to the fire and pop but not with enough force to kill you.
I know shooting components like primers can only be stored with maybe 5,000 in one place and there are probably similar storage requirements for powder. You can buy ammunition through regular mail but primers and power are limited to ground shipment and there is a HAZMAT fee.
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On Mon, 27 Jun 2016 09:58:20 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

When I was the president of the IBM skeet league, I was buying shotgun shells by the pallet. I am sure I had more ammo than that in my garage from time to time. It was "sprinklered" tho. There may be a rule for multifamily dwellings but it is going to be a state law.
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DerbyDad03 posted for all of us...

Yes

The ammo would heat up and propel the bullets a short distance at low speed and pressure. In firearms ammo is meant to be chambered. Beer bottles would create shrapnel and be undrinkable to first responders.
--
Tekkie

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wrote:

Shotgun shells do less than that. The sidewall just blows out and the shot will not even break the crimp. I would be more worried about a jerry can of gas in the garage and a propane cylinder irs a real concern
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On 6/28/2016 5:04 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

One word: Aerosol cans.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On 6/28/2016 5:36 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Aerosol cans, at least the butane ones, are designed to blow out a seam in a controlled fashion, not just blow up.
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On Tuesday, June 28, 2016 at 7:51:44 PM UTC-5, Taxed and Spent wrote:

CO2 is almost universally used now...unless you're talking about the fuel itself. WD-40 was a great thing for starting small engines...when it was pressurized with propane!
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On Tue, 28 Jun 2016 18:33:26 -0700 (PDT), bob_villain

There are plenty that shoot fire when you hold a lighter in front of them.
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On Tuesday, June 28, 2016 at 9:06:39 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I understand your point, but propellants have changed...if they worked more efficiently...they should have stayed with the flammable gases.
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On Tue, 28 Jun 2016 19:19:53 -0700 (PDT), bob_villain

The problem with CO2 is the vapor pressure is 25 times that of butane and 150 times that of freon. It would take a very substantial can to hold liquid CO2 and if it is not liquid, you might as well use air. You are not going to propel much product with a gas.
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On Tuesday, June 28, 2016 at 10:51:10 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

...now you're getting boring...thanks, we'll talk another day...
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On Tue, 28 Jun 2016 17:51:41 -0700, Taxed and Spent

Since they did away with the safe propellants with CFC, just about all of them have flammable gasses in them. It may not explode in a shower of shrapnel but they still can be exciting.
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On 06/28/2016 06:36 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Uhm, that's two words. ;-)
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