OT: Old laptop to get Internet on TV

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Do you need a laptop at all? The new Google Chromecast "adapter plugs straight into your TV to stream YouTube, Netflix and BBC iPlayer" says http://www.theguardian.com/media/2014/mar/20/google-chromecast-review-streaming-stick I think the N.American price is either $32 or $38.
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Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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Higgs Boson wrote:

Hi, You need a laptop which has HDMI port, Usually HD video/audio card. Then you can real time stream TV scenes or any other HD multi media program like You tube thru one cable, the HDMI cable. Even new ones won't cost much now. IfIs your TV 1080P compatible? You set up the video card for dual display primary one being laptop and let TV clone the laptop display. Card feature has that allows flexibility to configure that. What's to watch on TV any way? For me only news and sports event, that's about it.
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On 4/6/2014 8:30 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

As was mentioned before, the *simplest* solution would be to purchase a Roku. Cost: approx. $100.
The *cheapest* solution would be to purchase a Chromecast. Cost: approx. $35.
You can also connect a laptop to your television, as you mentioned. That's more expensive and takes a bit more dicking around to get it up and running. The link provided upthread on how to set it up has useful information. If you choose to do this, look for a laptop running Windows 7 (unless you're familiar with Win 8, there's a learning curve there that would just make it harder for you to use it). Select a laptop that has an HDMI output. The guy who is going on upthread about composite cable is wrong about the quality issue, and going with composite cable would only create more work and aggro for you. Keep it simple, stick to HDMI, the single-cable solution. Then purchase an HDMI cable, find a place to set your laptop, connect it to the tv with the cable and get work setting it up per the link upthread.
I use all three approaches. I use my laptop to play video files I own that are in formats that Chromecast and Roku can't handle. However, when all I want to do is stream content from the Internet onto my television, I use the Roku. The Roku is designed to make the process pretty darned simple. Seriously, if I were you I'd buy a Roku and try that before going with a laptop setup, *unless* there is specific content online you want that you know can't be accessed via Roku.
Here's a video on setting up and activating a Roku.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CnmvlSTlH8k

And here's a video on connecting a laptop to a tv via HDMI:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nKTXJ7TyIWA

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On Sunday, April 6, 2014 9:30:45 PM UTC-4, Higgs Boson wrote:

ograms on TV. (I gave up cable; too expensive and too few channels that in terest me. I tried OTA with an internal antenna & got a lot of stations, bu t what crap!

inputs.

Does it need to have the equivalent of the TV? Or...?

No, I would not try to use an old laptop. Laptops lag behind desktops in c omputing power. Plus they don't accept as many cards as laptops. I'd look for a regular pc. It doesn't have to be brand new but reasonably recent. Also look for one with hdmi or dvi output. Hdmi with sound is best. A pr operly configured hdmi connection to a decent tv will also let you view "pr otected" content. Get a wireless keyboard/trackpad combo and then you can put the computer somewhere out of sight.
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On 4/8/2014 5:31 PM, jamesgang wrote:

Since when?
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On Tue, 8 Apr 2014 14:31:52 -0700 (PDT), jamesgang

Anything big enough to run XP, will stream video. I had a 486 350 w/98 machine that would do it but it had a video accelerator in it.
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On Tue, 08 Apr 2014 17:50:21 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Make that a P II 350 sorry
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On Tuesday, April 8, 2014 5:52:31 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

t programs on TV. (I gave up cable; too expensive and too few channels tha t interest me. I tried OTA with an internal antenna & got a lot of stations , but what crap!

DMI inputs.

b. Does it need to have the equivalent of the TV? Or...?

in computing power. Plus they don't accept as many cards as laptops. I'd look for a regular pc. It doesn't have to be brand new but reasonably rece nt. Also look for one with hdmi or dvi output. Hdmi with sound is best. A properly configured hdmi connection to a decent tv will also let you view "protected" content. Get a wireless keyboard/trackpad combo and then you can put the computer somewhere out of sight.

You start trying to run hidef through it and you'll see it's not up to the task.
As others have suggested the op is probably better off with something curre nt for streaming like chromecast or a half decent blu-ray player than an ol d laptop.
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On Wed, 9 Apr 2014 21:08:01 -0700 (PDT), Higgs Boson
Why not a low profile desktop that is only for the TV? These days you can probably find one with XP on it virtually for free. They sell a USB dongle that get into your WiFi network and if your TV doesn't have VGA input, get that converter I posted yesterday.
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On 4/10/2014 1:08 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Chromecast less expensive and can use the existing desktop.
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It is not cheaper than a free XP machine and I bet you can find one these days pretty easy. The problem with any of these Roku, Chromecast, Amazon dongles is they are proprietary and not nearly as versatile as just having a PC there. Once you get used to having a PC and everything it will do, you will wonder why you never did it before.
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On 4/10/2014 2:28 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

http://www.cnet.com/videos/access-hidden-chromecast-features/
BTW, where can I find a free XP machine?
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On 04/09/2014 09:08 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:.

The idea is that you buy another desktop and put it by the TV.
Jon
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Commercial customers are throwing them away all the time and they have created such a "Y2K" sort of hype that I bet you can find one sitting on the curb. My wife is the IT person at the HOA she manages and she has had quite a few residents who say they are afraid to even turn their XP system on.
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