OT: nitrogen tires

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i've read articles online about this matter. but i would still like feedback from ppl that has actually switched over to it. has it significantly increased your gas mileage?
i drive around 50 miles to work (double that for the round trip) on a gas guzzling SUV. any fuel savings is appreciated.
also saw a propeller shaped wheel device that attaches to your air intake to create air turbulance. this is to make the fuel mix better with air in the combustion chamber (for increasing performance and mileage).
-a|ex
(please, no SUV vs car flames)
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No idea about the nitrogen tires; can't say I've ever heard of them.
Most of what I've read about the gizmo(s) for creating air turbulence is to the effect that they don't work.
MB
On 05/27/04 09:54 pm 127.0.0.1 put fingers to keyboard and launched the following message into cyberspace:

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Ah the tornado good deal, you may want to try water injection to and mothballs and high octane and spitfire plugs and remove your air filter you get more air, and helium in your tires { makes your vehicle lighter } Put a hole in yur muffler less back pressure- more milage. And dont forget remove that catalytic converter, who needs it. ya otta be gettin 40.88 mpg soon
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As I recall, that increases gas milage.
Nick
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They use Nitrogen in large aircraft tires, I've heard mainly in case of wheel well fires. A ruptured Nitrogen filled tire won't deliver a lot of oxygen.
The 'propeller shaped wheel device' and the like are marketing snake oil.
Erik
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Think w-i-d-e temperature ranges that change quickly. A jet tire can go from very cold to very hot in a single flight. At one extreme, a tire filled with moist air could end up with ice chunks inside the tire. At the other extreme, the expanding moisture could blow the tire off the rim.
Many single engine, low performance aircraft use plain old air.
Barry
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to
to
(for
I've done both of those and also added a water injector and some fuel additives. they work so well that when I get to work I have more gas than when I started. I'm always siphoning off the excess.
I've also added 19" to my penis with the various aid I've found in email offers.
Proper combustion is a matter of proper fuel/air mixture. Auto manufacturers have spent millions of $$$ to find the best way to handle it with fuel injectors controlled by computers. Some half assed whirly-gig is not going to help. They've been around for 50 years that I know of. If they worked, you can be sure we'd all have them by now.
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Edwin Pawlowski writes:

You mean the oil co's and the motor co's don't have a secret deal to keep them off the market?
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wrote:

Ooooooooooooohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh Baby......... 19 inches !!!!! I'm in love..... I can't wait to get you in my bed ! Wanna marry me big fella ????
Robert
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Yesterday was payday, today is gayday !


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This is Turtle.
I read a artical here while back where they stated that 60% of all autos were not tuned properly to get the gas mileage they should. Have you check the pressure in your tire, New plugs, wires, timing checked, or in general have you auto tuned up and checked out from one end to the other for you may be apart of the 60% of the autos that are burning too much fuel for not being tuned properly and tire pressure checked. Tire pressure alone can cost you 1 to 3 miles per gallon alone.
TURTLE
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TURTLE writes:

I'll bet 50 percent of them were at or above the median.
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to
Nope, and thats not the idea. I have used nitrogen in my tires for over 15 years. All our service trucks have 90 to 100 PSI in each tire, and since nitrogen is inert, it does not expand and contract, due to heat and cold as much as air...or other gasses. Most all your planes will use Nitrogen in the tires, for the same reasons. Same with drag cars...sunlight beating down on them does not effect the pressures as much. On our Hemi drag car, we use nothing but nitrogen for the tires, never use anything but.

I drive over 4500 miles a month, sometimes more, sometimes less in ONE service vehicle. We have several. Each has a 35 gallon tank that some days gets filled every day. If you cant afford to drive it, park it. The increase in fuel costs are not as bad as you think. Fuel went from $1.20 here for regular, (down from $1.70 5 years ago when I was in CA) to right at $2.00 a gallon in just a couple of months. Thats 80 cents per gallon more. You have say, a 20 gallon tank. You wont fill with 20 gallons ever, unless you have run out of fuel...then you might go to 21, 22, but thats not important. You are spending only $16 more to fill the tank. Picture 7 trucks every other day getting at least 30 gallons of fuel at $2 a gallon....$420 a pop.
Please...if you cant afford that, kill the internet service you are paying for.

to
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On a fuel injected car, its worthless. Period. On a carb'd car, its still worthless. Atomization is already at its peak, unless of course, its a wet intake like on a GM, or early Chrysler. If those things worked, and I mean, really worked, dont you think they would be part of all standard equipment on a vehicle?

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In alt.home.repair

Air is inert also. Air is in fact, 78% nitrogen and I would be VERY suprised if the expansion rates of pure nitrogen differ significantly from air. The primary benefit to using Nitrogen is that the lack of O2 keeps your tires from rotting and it doesn't leak out which keeps you from running underinflated.
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wrote:

trucks
gasses.
Umm....from someone thats changed more tires than you have owned....I am sure...you dont see tires rot from the inside, but from the outside. It has nothing at all to do wtih the oxygen content rotting a tire. All tires today contain additives to prevent internal breakdown due to oxygen exposure. UV breaks down the outside much faster. Air, is indeed inert, but the total expansion percentage at any given pressure, and temp, is greater than nitrogen. Also, nitrogen migates 3X slower than air, so your tires stay inflated at the pressure you set longer. Nitrogen reduces heat, so your tires last longer..and it actually reduces rolling resistance.
Now, if you will look up the ideal gas law, you will find that nitrogen is indeed better than air, and helium is better still....no joke....as far as expansion goes. Nitrogen attains a gas state below that of O2, so it will expand less than a product that attains a gas state above , or at the same temp that O2 will.
90.2 Kelvin is when O2 turns to a gas, and nitrogen is 77.3K, just for the record.
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I doubt it. Got numbers for each "migation" rate?

Would you have any evidence for these articles of faith?
Nick
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temp air nitrogen
260 F 0.0551 0.0533 80 F 0.0735 0.0713 ------ ------ 0.0184 0.0180 lb/ft^3
Are you VERY surprised? :-)
Nick
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In alt.home.repair snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

Bout what I figured :)
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CBhVAC:) writes:

I guess you don't study gas laws in HVAC school.
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On Thu, 27 May 2004 23:22:33 -0400, "CBhVAC:\)"

Dosen't that have more to do with moisture than anything else? I always thought it was the moisture in the air that caused tire pressure changes. Since air is eighty something percent nitrogen, I didn't think it was the gas itself.
My understanding of nitrogen in race car tires was that the dry nitrogen expanded at a controlled and repeatable rate, so that it was easier for the crew to calculate what cold tire pressure would equate to the desired hot pressure at a known temperature. By taking notes and measuring tire temperatures as the used tires come off the car, the proper cold pressure can be calculated without dealing with the variable of atmospheric humidity. At least that's the lore around the short track oval cars I've been around.
I don't see any benefit of using pure nitrogen in passenger car or light truck tires, other than fattening the provider's wallet.
Barry
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CB,
You lost me right at the start. Why do you have the tires on your trucks inflated to 100 psi? Your tires, if they are like car tires, are designed to operate at much lower pressure (25-35 psi). I would think that the overinflation would seriously degrade braking and handling and result in increased wear.. Also, Nitrogen is not inert.
Dave M.
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