OT -ish - Why shower runs cold first

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Clueless.
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On 6/6/2010 10:20 PM, Ron wrote:

Which Alabama on which planet are you referring to? Bama is my home and I've been to both Florida and Louisiana which is the LA I hope you're referring to. Get into the hills of NE Bama and you will wind up in the clouds and that can be 100% humidity making it hard to breath when it hits 100F. Air conditioning saved The South but it attracted those Damn Yankees and we can't get them to go home.
TDD
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On Mon, 07 Jun 2010 03:35:05 -0500, The Daring Dufas

That would sound MUCH better if you used the correct word, 'breathe'. 'Breath' here just sounds stupid.

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On 6/7/2010 10:50 AM, George B wrote:

Ouch! He got me! I neglected to use what I learned in proofreading 101. eye caynt spel
TDD
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Thanks for making my point after you wrote this "I suggest you read about the laws of physics and heat transfer. Heat energy will always seek out the lower temperature and the AC is removing heat from living spaces. Look up equilibrium."

In the north, if you need to have your house replumbed, how else is it going to be done w/o running the pipes in the attic?
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wrote:

I don't know how that makes your point. I think the part abou tseeing the lower temperature is ambiguous for someone who doesn't already understand what is meant, and might be misunderstood.

At great expense, but they don't put the pipes in the attic.
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From the OP that I questioned........"If the house is air conditioned, it will cool off more." Talking about the water pipes *inside* the walls.
Why don't you answer my post that was addressed directly to you?

So where do they put them?
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Meant to include this
http://groups.google.com/group/alt.home.repair/msg/3d56dd410521710a
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wrote:

I thought the other two guys covered everything, but I'll look at it again.

Where they were in the first place. That's why it's expensive. Or they save money by running them outside a wall, in a corner, and building a box around them. Most attics are unheated and water pipes will freeze and break in the winter.
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In the slab?
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wrote:

They may exist, but I've never seen a house built on a slab in the north. My brother had an expensive house in Dallas, two houses in a row actually, but they weren't for me because they had no basement and so little storage room.
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wrote:

I'm in the eastern middle of NY and while I agree that it is a terrible idea- it has been done.
In the late 50's it was 'the rage' -- "Warm floors from your radiant heating" "No cold, leaking basements"
In the 70's I was selling heating systems to an entire development with slab heating that had failed. It was aptly named 'Cold Brook'. [and I might add- because it was the 50's and the floor was heated, anyway, none of these houses even had perimeter insulation, so that was the first money these folks had to spend]
Jim
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My in-laws had a house on a slab in Illinois.
My current house is on a slab, too. I agree with you, but only one house we looked at had a basement and it was on the side of a ravine (and looked about to slide down).
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Usually in the basement, but if there is no basement, in walls, or floors. *NEVER* in the attic. Frozen pipes == not good.
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Same place it was from the start. In the basement.
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I'm not sure what point you mean. The attic is above the insulation and subject to the outside temperature influence. Interior walls will be the same temperature as the living spaces over time as they are giving off or gaining heat through the drywall.
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In the north, most of the pipes run through the basement and inside of the (preferably interior) walls if the house has more than one story.
Most northern houses have basements. Once you've dug down four feet to get the foundation below the frost line, you may as well keep digging another couple of feet to obtain useful storage and utility space. (Nowadays, they usually go to eight, but my vintage 1948 basement is about 6 feet.)
Cindy Hamilton
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My early 1800s basement is just over 6' in most areas, but since it was hand-dug, there are some places where it's only about 5' and even I have to duck. Everyone has to duck around the pipes!
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wrote:

Let me try to explain this so even you could understand it.
Let's assume the following temps to be true: Wall temp ~80 Attic temp (daytime) ~120 Outside temp (daytime) ~80 Water Heater Temp ~140 Ground temp ~60
When cold water is first called for during the day you get 80(From the wall area pipes) then 120 (From the attic pipes) then 80 (from the outside pipes) and finally 60 (from the ground pipes).
See how simple that was?
Now at night the temps in the attic and outside will be cooler. Plug those values into the above explanation and see how it changes.
I know that's a lot of information for you to comprehend but give it a try.
Gordon Shumway A Liberal is a person who will give away everything he doesn't own.
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OK, go for it smartass.

We aren't talking about "wall temps". We are talking about the temp *inside* the walls, were EVERYTHING is the same temp, including the COLD water pipes, as was stated in the OP that I questioned. "If the house is air conditioned, it will cool off more". There were no parameters given.

No shit Sherlock. Thanks for making my point.
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