OT - Insurers dropping Chinese drywall policies

Page 2 of 4  

On Oct 16, 12:53 pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Tell us how to tell the difference between the good and the bad sheetrock.
TMT
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Your first clue should be the word(s) immediately following the phrases "Made In" or "Product Of".
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Oct 16, 3:04 pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Chinese products regularly use false "made in the USA" labels.
Even if it is labeled Made in China does not make it bad.
Again...tell us how to tell the difference between the good and the bad sheetrock.
The problem is harder than it looks.
TMT
TMT
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The Chinese product was used years ago. The chance you'd find it in a supply yard today is about the same as finding fire retardant plywood, which was a defective prroduct produced in the USA in the 80's that lead to hundreds of millions in lawsuits.
When it comes time to sue, the usual procedure is to go after everyone in the chain that was involved, assuming they have some assets or insurance worthy of a claim, In this case that would seem to be the builder, perhaps the sub, the supplier, importer, and manufacturer.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Oct 17, 2:32 am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

How do you know that it is "used up"?
Once you have defective material in the supply chain, you never know when it will turn up.
I agree on the line of liability.
Bring deep pockets to any court.
TMT
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Your second clue should be the brand name.

Yes, you *do* seem to have trouble with a lot of simple things.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 17 Oct 2009 11:27:38 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

The most common name was Knauf, a German company that makes or imports drywall from all over the world.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Too_Many_Tools wrote:

Smell it?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 16 Oct 2009 11:35:28 -0700 (PDT), Too_Many_Tools

What name is on it? The Chinese stuff won't be Georgia Pacific or USG or American Gypsum.
Or take a sample and wet it. The chinese stuff smells like something wild whizzed on it.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 16 Oct 2009 17:53:09 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

The only problem with that thinking is there is a lot of US made drywall that shows some sulfur out gassing too. Until this Chinese thing came up they never really looked. They are still trying to establish what the safe level is.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/16/2009 12:02 AM, Too_Many_Tools wrote:

Wow. That's just nutty that the insurance companies are allowed to drop them because of it. The car analogy doesn't wash...if I'm in an accident due to a defective car part I would expect the insurance company to pay me and then turn around and sue the manufacturer to get reimbursed.
I wonder if there are any standards on allowable chemical fumes emitted by drywall? If there weren't, the insurance companies shouldn't be able to do this. If there were, then whoever approved the importing of the drywall should be on the hook.
I bet any housing inspector with a chemical sniffer is going to be in high demand for the next while.
Chris
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The key point here is that this type of problem was never covered under any homewoner's policy that I've had, nor do I think any policy would likely cover it. If the furnace turns out to be defective, or the front door falls apart prematurely, your homeowner's policy won't pay for it. The reason they are canceling is likely because they know the risk of them having a claim of a secondary nature is high. Examples would be the owner deciding to stage a fire to get out of the problem, or a house guest suing them for medical claims. Now those would typically be covered.

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Oct 17, 2:40 am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I think you are right.
The first claim is not the last one in a corrosive environment.
TMT
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Too_Many_Tools wrote:

Isn't it about time we stop buying Chinese products? All the lead problems, now this. The US should ban importing all Chinese products until they make good for all the crap they have already sold us.
I'm curious if the drywall used in China has the same problem, or is it just the stuff sent over here? And their children's toys, do they have lead or just the stuff shipped over here?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Drywall in china? Rice-paper walls - but if they use drywall it will be the same crap.
As for the toys, you can be assured their citizens get the poisoned stuff too. Remember the Melamine fiasco????? Killed a lot of chinese kids.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tony wrote:

At this stage of the game, that might be rather difficult.

Sad to say, they don't seem to be doing any better for their own kids.
The real problem appears to be a mix of greed and ignorance.
I'm certainly glad we don't suffer from those here. :-T
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

American Capitalism at its finest. Buy the cheapest crap you can and charge the most you can for max profit. Make sure it is not made in the USA where oversight and living wages reduce your profit margin.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Don't just blame the businesses. They sell what people will buy. Just watch your neighbors shop for the lowest possible price on appliances, cars, home goods, etc. They will buy the China stuff to save $5 even if their mother works for the US appliance maker and will get laid off from lack of sales. . Why pay $129 for that color TV when I can get it for $119? I'm a smart shopper, right?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Don't blame the buyers or the sellers--just recognize that (economic) incentives matter and the confusion will disappear. Economic incentives, of course, include more than pecuniary ones.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well said. I wish basic economics would be required in high school. Then people might understand how markets work.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.