OT Idiot lights-out drivers

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I wasn't referring to Canada and the USA, I was referring to the so called statistics about DRLs increasing safety, when it's bloody obvious they don't. Read this (DaDRL is a worldwide voluntary group of experienced motorists including Scientists, Engineers, Mathematicians, Lawyers and Ophthalmological experts who are supported by the leading Pedestrian, Cyclist and Motorcyclist organisations): http://www.dadrl.org.uk
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Obvious to your small mind perhaps. The insurance companies definitely feel differently about it than you do. And so do many other motoring safety groups In 5 minutes I could likely find 10 or more studies showing there is a safety advantage to counter every one of yours stating there is not.

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http://www.dadrl.org.uk
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On 2/13/2016 8:48 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

A NHTSA study in 2004 entitled "An Assessment of the Crash-Reducing Effectiveness of Passenger Vehicle Daytime Running Lamps (DRLs)" found the followinng:
DRLs reduced opposite direction daytime fatal crashes by –6.3 percent that is DRLs increase opposite direction daytime fatal crashes by 6.3 percent.
DRLs reduced opposite direction/angle daytime non-fatal crashes by –7.9 percent that is DRLs increase opposite direction/angle daytime non-fatal crashes by 7.9 percent.
DRLs reduced non-motorists, pedestrians and cyclists, daytime fatalities in single-vehicle crashes by 3.8 percent.
DRLs reduced daytime opposite direction fatal crashes of a passenger vehicle with a motorcycle by 26 percent.
Definitely mixed results, but not unexpected.
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They're increasing accidents in the very area they're meant to help in - seeing another car coming the other way. And helping where I'd expect worse crashes - distracting you from seeing an unlit pedestrian. Perhaps they remind pedestrians to look before crossing (do we care about morons who don't look?). The main problem is they dazzle other motorists so you they can't judge where the edge of your car is. This is documented on websites complaining about DRLs, where the people complaining are professional optometrists etc who know what they're talking about.
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On 02/12/2016 04:30 PM, Mr Macaw wrote:

Absolutely. Running daytime lights on a bike probably doesn't buy you much in terms of people seeing you but it's at least a little edge. When everyone's lights are on that little edge goes away.
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wrote:

The edge does NOT go away. Wheather a bike or a car, SOMETHING is occupying the road ahead coming your direction. Hitting a car head on isn't going to do any less damage to you than hitting a bike - - -
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On 02/12/2016 09:24 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Considering I'm the guy on the bike, I'd prefer some moron didn't hit me head on, or what is much more common, blissfully make a left hand turn in front of me because they 'didn't see' me. Car drivers only see other cars. Anything smaller than a minivan is off their radar completely. They *might* notice a headlight, but if it's just one little headlight in a stream of DRL's, they're going to ignore it.
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On 2/13/2016 12:01 AM, rbowman wrote:

People zone out when driving. They get "acclimated" to a particular set of stimuli -- then tend to ignore it.
If you want to be noticed, you have to stand out by "being different". E.g., a headlight that flashes, etc.
This is the rationale for every tweek to the safety equipment (e.g., now center mounted brake lights *flash* when first applied; it's not enough that they are UP HIGH, in your LINE OF SIGHT -- cuz you've gotten used to seeing them there and now "tune them out".
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On 02/13/2016 12:23 AM, Don Y wrote:

Brake lights should broadcast a wifi signal that flashes the smartphone screens of the texting driver(s) behind you when you apply the brakes. Or is there already an app for that?
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On 2/13/2016 6:38 AM, Gene Yuss wrote:

Ha! Or, "we interrupt this call to tell you that you're about to *ss-end the vehicle in front of you. Please hang up so we can autodial your insurance carrier..."
[Actually, I suspect there will be pressure for phones to report the "their" speed of travel whenever they "notice" a sudden, instantaneous change (decrease) in speed! Perhaps not legislated but, rather, insurance company incentives. Given how integrated telecoms are becoming with new cars, it wouldn't be hard for the car to "tattle" on the driver. IIRC, our owner's manual essentially says this -- though in an obtuse way.]
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Don Y wrote:

That is why when you pick up the new car, you have to spend some time with delivery specialist(usually young kids) asking any questions about this new gadgets. Not everything is in the manual.
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On 2/13/2016 11:06 AM, Tony Hwang wrote:

What's in the manual is a legal disclaimer. I'd be willing to bet that anyone at the dealer would be incapable of explaining the *real* impact of this disclosure: namely, that someone could subpoena the logs from your vehicle to determine if you were at fault in an accident, to discover who you have talked with (a la Patriot Act) *through* the vehicle's comms, etc.
Sort of like google claiming that their tracking of your searches is to enable them to "provide a better search experience" (where "better" means "more profitable for its advertisers"!)
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On Sat, 13 Feb 2016 09:07:11 -0700, Don Y

many vehicles currently record the last "X" seconds of information - speed, steering input, brake input etc in a loop that is stopped when the airbags go off, so the speed at impact and weather the brakes were applied or not is frozen fr all time.
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On 2/13/2016 1:25 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Yes, it's called a "black box" (named for the "black boxes" on aircraft).
But, as many vehicles can (and do!) connect to remote servers, you don't really know *what* information the car is leaking about your driving activities.
E.g., our GPS has support for real-time "traffic" updates. If tasked with designing such a capability, I'd immediately posit: "Well, we have lots of OUR VEHICLES on the streets.
They each know where *they* are located.
They also know how fast they are traveling.
If we ASSUME that the drivers are trying to drive as fast as conditions permit, then the current speed of a particular vehicle on a particular stretch of roadway can be a reasonable indication of the traffic conditions on that roadway -- at this instant!
So, have all the vehicles report their location to our server.
Then, sort through any conflicting reports and update the real-time *traffic map* to reflect these conditions.
And, on the next update cycle, tell the vehicles what the traffic in their vicinity is like.
I.e., let the drivers be our data collection system!"
A side effect of this is that *your* vehicle's position is continually reported "for the benefit of others" -- not just when *you* attempt to contact the "concierge service", "emergency 911", etc.
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Invasion of privacy.
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Don Y posted for all of us...

The ECM knows all...
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Tekkie

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On Sat, 13 Feb 2016 06:38:07 -0700, Gene Yuss wrote:

How about coded beeps from the horn to warn drivers & pedestrians close by who are NOT texting. I would not recommend this simply for applying the brakes, and probably the beeps should be a bit muted. But it could give a heads-up to those close at hand when:
1) The ABS is active. Usually, this means that the driver has allowed his speed to exceed the safe limit to bring the car to stop without activating the ABS. Possibly the car cannot stop to avoid hitting a pedestrian, and the driver will not have time to think about sounding the horn.
2) Automatic redar-controlled braking is was actived. Usually, this means that either the driver or a nearby pedestrian has erred in judgement.
3) The lane-keeping alarm was sounded within the car. Possibly the driver is impaired by fatigue, texting, or intoxicants. Warn everyone nearby.
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Incorrect, I activate ABS all the time. It means I'm fully utilising the ability of the car.

I don't have that fitted, but if I did, I'd be inclined not to bother braking for anything, and let the car do it for me.

I wonder, do those things activate if you change lanes on a motorway without indicating? Or is it clever enough to work out how quickly you're changing lanes? Surely sometimes you might change lane fairly slowly, in which case how would it know you hadn't done it in error?
I wish they did activate if you didn't indicate, that would stop all those morons who don't know what an indicator stalk is. Car will not allow lane change without indication!
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On 02/17/2016 09:26 AM, Mr Macaw wrote:

Damn, I'm glad you're in Scotland.
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