OT Idiot lights-out drivers

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On 02/13/2016 03:04 PM, Mr Macaw wrote:

As someone from a country where Evelyn Waugh married Evelyn Gardner and it wasn't a same sex marriage, there might be some confusion with British names :)
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On 2/13/2016 8:25 PM, rbowman wrote:

Clare can be a last name too.
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I've heard that in French, but not in any normal country.
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So only Scotland is a normal country? At any rate, the surname Clare is NOT particularly French, although it's origins may trace back to the Normans as indicated below (from wikipedia)
Clare is a surname of English origin. The name is also prevalent among families of Irish origin, and there is a Clare County, Clare Island and River Clare in Ireland which attests to a long historical relationship with those places. The name was likely derived from the titular de Clare first held by Richard fitz Gilbert, a Welsh lord from a Norman family. Or from surnamedb.com:
Last name: Clare
This most interesting and ancient surname, with its long association with the British nobility, has three possible origins. It may be Olde English and derive from the pre 8th century word 'cleare' which translates as 'bright or clear' and as such was applied to various rivers and a Manor in the county of Suffolk. A second possibility is French, from a place called Clere in Normandy and first recorded in the 1086 Domesday Book of England, whilst the third is baptismal from the French 'Claire' or the Latin 'Clara' which themselves translate as 'bright of fair'. The original spelling forms were Clere, Clarae, Clara, Clare, and Clair(e), however there is some confusion in that in the early days the surnames were almost always proceeded by the French preposition 'de', although by the 16th century its use had almost died out. Irish nameholders also trace their heritage from the same sources, Richard de Clare, Earl of Pembroke, and better known as 'Strongbow' was the great leader of the Anglo-Norman Invasion of Ireland in 1170. The primary source of the surname is probably the Clare family of Clare in Suffolk, who received the Dukedom of Clarence in 1362. Early examples of the surname include Bogo de Clare of Oxford in the 1273 Kings Rolls, Goditha Clare of Kent in 1317, and Thomas Clair of St Giles Cripplegate, London on January 19th 1664. The 'first' Clare/Clair(e) into the New American Colonies of King James 1 was probably Mr Clare, Master of the Ship 'Gods Gift' of London. Unfortunately he was dead when he 'arrived' at Elizabeth City on or about February 16th 1623. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Richard de Clare, which was dated 1086, The Domesday Book for County Suffolk, England, during the reign of King William 1, 1066 - 1087. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.
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On 2/14/2016 9:31 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I like the name Clare. You said it was short for "Clarence", so that makes sense.
--
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Joseph is male, but Josie isn't.
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On 03/03/2016 17:19, Mr Macaw wrote:

Josie can be male, in Portugal though.
--
Bod

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as

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Isn't that Hos?
-- Blind faith is an ironic gift to return to the creator of human intelligence.
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On 03/03/2016 18:00, Mr Macaw wrote:

No, but it is in Spain.
--
Bod

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Don't the portguweez speak Spanish too?
-- I can kind of understand why Muslims get so frustrated. I mean, how many more people are they going to have to murder before everyone understands that Islam is the religion of peace?
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On 03/03/2016 19:04, Mr Macaw wrote:

Mirandese is the only recognised regional language spoken in Portugal (beside Portuguese, the only official language in Portugal). Spanish and calão (the way caló, language of the Iberian Romani, is referred to in Portuguese). Portuguese language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portuguese_language
--
Bod

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e:

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I thought they were pretty similar, so a test using Google Translate: English: This is a random sentence intended to compare Spanish with Portuguese. Spanish: Esta es una frase al azar que equipare espaol con el portugus. Portuguese: Esta uma frase aleatria destina-se a comparar Espanhol com Portugus. Fairly the same. Probably easy to understand someone speaking one if you know the other fluently.
-- What the best way to get a guy to stop smoking after sex? Fill his waterbed with gasoline.
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On 03/03/2016 19:18, Mr Macaw wrote:

Indeed.
--
Bod

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All of the latin based languages have enough similarity to be confusing - that includes French, Italian, Portugese and Spanish. Just enough difference to really screw you up - and even the difference between potugese portugese and brazilian portugese, or parisienne french and quebecois or Cajun French can really throw you a curve ball - particularly when spoken. Written is not quite so bad.
Heck, even english from one area to another can be virtualluy unintelligible.
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:

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Italian and Spanish is easy to convert. Italian words end in O and Spanish end in A.
-- Impeccable, adjective: something which cannot be destroyed by the beak of a parrot. Scientists have yet to discover such a substance.
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On 03/03/2016 12:04 PM, Mr Macaw wrote:

Fuck no.
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Nu...nu...nu...nu...near enough.
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On 03/03/2016 07:55 PM, Mr Macaw wrote:

Don't the British speak Norsk?
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Why would we?
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On 03/07/2016 03:11 PM, Mr Macaw wrote:

That's the question the Portuguese would ask about speaking Spanish.
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