OT: Hurricanes, New Orleans

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I'm holding my breath while another hurricane passes me by, not hoping it goes elsewhere particularly. There is an old map, 1779, in the Library of Congress with some really interesting notes. One note, especially, says that the Island of Grand Gosier (just NE of mouth of the Mississippi) was entirely washed away in a hurricane in 1772, but in 1776 had recovered about a mile at the south end and since that hit has almost resumed it's old form and dimensions. Good reference for real estate speculation :o)
I get irritated with Florida folks who want to keep others off "their" beach, but demand the gov't. (me) replenish "their" beach when it washes away.
Ennyhoo......good luck and God speed to all those in the storm. May your breezes be light and fragrant :o) Stay safe.
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I get irritated by people living below sea level that want the government (you) to bail them out (literally and figuratively) after a hurricane. Move, you dummy, water runs down hill.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

It's a conundrum. New Orleans is the busiest port in the nation. Most of the agricultural exports of the midwest moves through the port as well as a goodly portion of manufactured goods from the industrial heartland. Over 6,000 ships use the port each year. $10 or $20 billion every few years to rebuild the city is piddly compared to moving the port facilities upstream or to Alabama.
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It isn't the port that is the problem. It could stay there quite well. It is residential housing and businesses in a very poor location.
Harry K
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Harry K wrote: ...

The port can't exist as an operational entity in isolation, however.
--
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It does not need the work force living in the bottom of a swimming pool right next door though. All the facilities would work just as well if the workers commuted in from 10 or 20 miles away.
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

I would move the port and the city a hundred or two miles upstream.
Philadelphia has quite a fine port about 100 miles upriver, hampered only by locally strong unions and local-&-state high taxes!
Baltimore has quite a competitive port!
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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On Sep 1, 9:12pm, snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:

That would be good for the delta also. Remove all channelling and levees below the port excet for those necessary to maintain navigation access. Let the river rebuild the lost wetlands.
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

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Sounds very good. Haven't heard of that before. Does away with the need for channelization, etc. Just enough dredging to get the river boats through.
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

Agreed. All the money and volunteer work from the kind-hearted souls to rebuild Lower 9th, would have been much better put to buying them out, and starting a new suburb on high ground somewhere. Yes, I understand people get attached to living in Grandpappy's house, and the culture of a multi-generational community- but common sense has to intrude at some point. From the latest maps, looks like Mother Nature is gonna give NO a dope slap upside the head about it, with a much shorter interval than she usually does. Maybe this time they will listen.
And for you flamers- I do have a dog in this fight. I own a house about 4 hours west of NO. However, it is about 10 feet above sea level, and still has a parish of wetlands between it and the ocean to buffer the storm surge. Only minor damage last time, but still keeping my fingers crossed.
-- aem sends...
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On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 06:55:42 -0700 (PDT), Harry K

The government had a great chance to fix this a couple years ago when all the houses were under water. They should have scraped off the whole place, barged in enough dirt to get it above the FEMA building level the rest of the country has to abide by and then let the people build back at a decent wind code standard. If they had done this Gustav would just be a minor inconvenience.
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clipped

neighbor would be under water if we had a direct hit with 20' storm surge. NO, or part of it, is BELOW sea level. Waves on top of that? And that isn't a cat' 5.
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wrote:

New Orleans is far enough from the Gulf to avoid most of the real storm surge. Even when you do have rising water, if you are above sea level a significant height it recedes very fast. You don't have that shit bowl for weeks they had in NOLA
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

where the tidal areas are shallow. Katrina was only a cat. 3. This link is to a graphic that explains well: http://www.nola.com/hurricane/popup/scourgeofsurge_jpg.html
The top of my seawall is about three feet above the water at highest normal high tide. During one hurricane that passed far offshore from us, the surge was great enough to put water over the top of our seawall. It wasn't even stormy here, but the water was far higher than normal.
If Gustav goes a little west of NO, then the greater force of counter clockwise wind and storm surge east of the eye will hit them.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in wrote in message

I think much of NOLA is more than 20 FEET below sea level,and sinking more every year. that's a LOT of fill dirt.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
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There are thousands of people out of work in the Ohio valley and lots of big machines sitting idle. Dirt is cheap compared to what we will be spending in the next month down there.
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wrote in message

I had a thought, most won't like it, but it could solve a couple of problems. Those areas that are way below sea level, use it as a land fill. Truck in garbage from all over, as available land fill space is getting rare, but many areas in most cities are built over former land fill as it was common in the past to use garbage and waste to fill in low areas and ravines. The city could make money charging for dumping at the same time raise up the area to above sea level. When it is full, the land will be high enough to compensate for the sinking for a while.
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EXT wrote:

That actually could work, but it's not quite that easy. You'd have to deal with the runoff from the compacted fill (e.g. "cream of dumpster soup") the methane produced by decaying garbage, and the problem of getting the stuff compacted engough to build on in the first place (without having to drive deep pilings for every single building.)
That said, it has been done - e.g. Haneda Airport (Tokyo)
nate
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the city.
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