OT: How to sew a small patch on jeans?

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Serious. I was welding, burnt a small hole in a new pair of jeans. Hole is tiny, under .5 sq. inch counting the fringe around the hole.
What's the best way to patch so it will be minimally noticable? I got matching spare fabric, common sewing needles, not much skill.
Thanks, Will
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You no longer have a new pair of jeans. You have a new pair of work jeans.
Sorry, that's the best I have.
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Wilfred Xavier Pickles wrote:

Where is the hole?
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wrote:

Hollywood elitists/stars pay thousands of dollars for jeans with just the right kind of holes in them. Maybe you can sell the jeans and buy new ones with the profits. God knows none of them would be caught dead welding something to achieve the same kind of hole.
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Wife? Girl friend? Sympathetic neighbor lady?
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Charlie Darwin wrote:

invisibly patch denim, that wouldn't cost more than another pair of pants. I'd cut a belt loop off a worn-out pair, and sew one end over the spot, and the other end however far a way, and make it a feature of the design, as a place to hang your measuring tape, cell phone, ipod, or whatever. If you must patch, sew a patch on the inside. trim the fringe, dab the white threads with a blue sharpie, and then use the sewing version of super-glue to keep the loose threads in place. A piece of fusing tape (other than right behind the hole) will keep the patch flush to the hole. Use 'invisible stitching' with a dark blue or black thread, hiding the stitches in the wales of the fabric. For that matter, the classic cure we remember from our youth, iron-on patches, are still available. Modern heat-setting or aero-setting glues make them work a whole lot better than they used to. I even found thin nylon patches in the correct color to patch the burn holes in my 3b2 parka. You can barely see the patch if you look for it.
-- aem sends...
-- aem sends...
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I patch my husband's jeans....get some iron on interfacing - it's "sticky" on both sides. Or, buy some of the iron on hem tape that is sticky on both sides... you only need about an inch of this so I would ask around and try to borrow it from someone who sews and keeps it on hand. Cut off a piece of denim from an old pair of jeans ... a little larger than the hole. Turn jeans wrong side facing out ... cut the iron on tape in small pieces to go around the hole ... place old denim fabric on top - then put hot iron on it. The patch will stick to the jeans. Take cloth - cotton is best, old hankerchief or napkin - wet it good and wring the water out. Place on patch and put the hot iron on again to really seal it. Hardly shows when you turn the pants again. If you can't find a friend who has this stuff in her sewing kit, you can buy it at Walmart in the fabric department - it's not a bad idea for a bachelor to keep stuff like this on hand.
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Dorothy wrote:

Chuckle. I thought that was one of the solutions I proposed, but I probably used the wrong technical terms.
What are the odds the OP even HAS an iron? I have one, but it is too nasty to actually use on the outside of clothes, since I use it to fuse things together. I never have owned an ironing board, and probably never will....
''who has this stuff in her sewing kit''? There ya go again. I've had a sewing kit of sorts ever since I moved out on my own. The needles in in are probably 60 years old, given to me by my grandfather.
-- aem sends...
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Fuse with an iron? Beats me!
I do gotta iron and board, no problem.
Coincidentally, I spyed a couple iron-on patches in a drawer (maybe 20 years old) last month, tested one to see if it'd stick. It didn't and I pitched 'em.

Similar, here. Good for needle and thread, and no more.
Thanks for your suggestions.
Will
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wrote:

I'm just curious: How old are you?
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

years ago.
-- aem sends...
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wrote:

I'm asking the OP, Wilfred.
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Dorothy wrote:

I could probably sew on a button as well as any woman on the planet!
But I'd rather go to hell with a broken back.
I'm sure many women feel the same way about doing a valve job on a 487 cu in Marauder engine.
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I dunno how much of that I'll be able to do, but it's all worth considering.
Much Thanks, Will
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snipped-for-privacy@screwmail.com wrote:

Get thee to Walmart. They sell iron-on patches made from denim.
You don't need no stinking neadles and threads.
You can find them with cute designs too; Hello Kitty, Hanah Montana, or whatever rocks your little boat ;-)
--
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wrote:

Rivet a piece of aluminum to the jeans.
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ransley wrote:

You may laugh, but the legend is that Levi Strauss used rivets to hold together denim sail material for a pair of trousers. All the miners in San Francisco wanted his concoction because of trouser fatalities in the gold-mining camps. A dynasty was founded.
Tragically, the company has lost its focus in recent years and succumbed to the "San Francisco" disease.
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some they have are styled like rivets on some fasteners
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Wilfred Xavier Pickles wrote:

1. Throw the pair out and use it as rug when doing oil change. 2. Or I'd put on a tiny cute button. 3. If you want to patch, from inside with a patching glue.
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Look for a dry cleaner with a "Tailoring" sign in the window. Give them the jeans. Go home. Come back when the jeans are ready.
Easy.
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