OT: How to get cops to enforece law

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Wrong.
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Not to arrest them on the spot. They can, obviously (or maybe not) arrest someone for a misdemeanor with a warrant, but not just come in off the street, take the report and go get them.
--
People thought cybersex was a safe alternative,
until patients started presenting with sexually
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further
the
That's the way it is in Maryland. When some butthead threatened to kill me for taking his (un)assigned parking space and pushed me in full view of half a dozen witnesses I had to go to a commissioner to swear out a warrant with a friend who had witnessed the event. About a week later the sheriffs came and arrested him while he was at his dining room table, cutting up his cocaine. Turns out he was a small time dealer but with enough in his possession that day to make it a felony. He was expecting one of his clients when he answered the door and didn't even bother moving the drugs out of plain sight, which, as you know, gave them probable cause to seize the drugs, the scale, the little squares of packaging paper and more. Revenge is sometimes very, VERY sweet. I only regret that I wasn't there to see his face when he opened the door and discovered it wasn't his druggie customer. I've done the same thing, sort of, expecting my wiseass friend at the door and saying to the mailman "It's about time you got here, you stupid son of a bitch!"
Whoops!
I suspect that without the witness, the commissioner would have declined to issue the warrant.
-- Bobby G.
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On 7/2/2011 1:20 PM, Robert Green wrote:

good story
also a possible reason to carry a pocket camcorder or camphone most places these days.
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me
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Always do. I bought a number of pen-sized color and sound video recorders that produce amazing video on a removable 16GB TF card when they work. But they are unreliable in many ways, impossible to set the dates on properly because of the poor Chinglish docs and you never know how long the battery will last. Each operates on a different set of colored flashing LEDs that mean different things in different contexts. Great for covert work. When they work.
-- Bobby G.
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On 6/26/2011 10:21 PM, Wilfred Xavier Pickles wrote:

Document his behavior, use a video camera and get several witnesses. Sue the bastard for his house, take it away from him and kick him out. We had a case here where a neighbor sued another over a nuisance. The wife ignored the summons and lost by default. She never told her husband what was going on and he came home from work one day to find his stuff being removed from his former home which now belonged to the neighbor. Perhaps you can sue the nut job and he will ignore the summons and lose by default. It could be a lot of fun for you. :-)
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

What judge would grant a default judgment on a nuisance case, and give the whole house to the plaintiff? How bad could the nuisance (obviously the female) be if the plaintiff was suing for the value of the entire house?
What's the rest of the story?
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On 6/27/2011 1:17 PM, G. Morgan wrote:

I don't remember all the details but if I can find it in The Birmingham News archive I'll post a link to the story. I just remember the wife didn't tell her husband what was going on and he was blindsided by a default judgment. It's been some years.
TDD
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On Mon, 27 Jun 2011 09:03:15 -0500, The Daring Dufas

Thanks, but he's not that dumb. He's a manipulator and a hustler, could sweet-talk granma out of her false teeth.
They do fireworks in back where they have a privacy fence. I got a dig-cam that will do a little video. Better than nothing.
Thing is, it's not supposed to be my job to enforce the law. Thats what we are paying cops (plenty, plenty, and plenty) to do.
Will
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On 6/27/2011 2:10 PM, Wilfred Xavier Pickles wrote:

The first time I ever got the police to arrest anyone who wronged me was to do damage to the dirt bag first by myself. I gave the guy a bath with pepper spray for breaking a window out of my van and the police caught the guy a few blocks away because he was freaked out trying to get the wicked stuff out of his eyes. It was his third felony and it was supposed to be enough to send him away for life but there was a plea bargain. I imagine the critter has screwed up several times since then and is probably doing life somewhere. You have to stand up for yourself because you can't demand that law enforcement do diddly. There are times when you have to prod them into action by gathering evidence yourself and sometimes call in a member of the press to embarrass the cops into taking action. I don't know if your community has a TV station that has a "Channel xx On Your Side" where TV reporters investigate complaints from citizens who can't get the local government to take action, something like that and local talk radio shows are often effective when a news reporter starts calling the local law enforcement boss.
TDD
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In typed:

File a formal, written complaint each time it happens. Quote the offender's exact words to you when you discussed it with him. Share it with the newspapers if nothing happens but stick to FACTS only! NO opinions. Find & quote the law from any source you can find its number & title from. Opinions would only have a place in an open, short editorial. Be very careful not to libel or defame.
HTH,
Twayne`
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Have you tried offering them a donut?
-Bob
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Wilfred Xavier Pickles wrote:

That's a tough one. My ex g/f had her home burglarized and the cop took 45min.- 1 hour to get there (Houston). Once there, he didn't want any part of an 'investigation', he just wanted to file the report and go (close to end-of-shift). She asked him to take fingerprints, they were all over the plasma TV they couldn't get off the wall. He wouldn't take prints from 'anywhere'. He basically just told her to never expect her jewelry back.
I wasn't there. It would have been different if I was. I would have asked for a Sergeant to come out, instead of let this jerk just blow me off. You know damn well if the cop was burglarized there would be a full CSI unit out there!
All I can suggest is to request a supervisor (usually a Sergeant), and document the complaint (the guy shooting fireworks) and the police response with video/audio. Then you can deal with the D/A directly. You could also call the State Police and ask for advice. They may intervene.
Check your State laws about recording audio. Some States are funny about that. http://www.rcfp.org/taping/states.html
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These are all related to telephone calls. As long as one is outside or in another public place, you are free to tape from either your yard or a public area such as a sidewalk. There is no expectation of privacy in a public setting. The courts have said, for instance, that photographers can take pictures of anything they see from the sidewalk. However, they have also stated that you can't put a ladder on the aforementioned public sidewalk to gaze over the 8 foot high brick wall. The cops would be hard pressed to say anything if you recorded your phone conversation with them, since they tape everything anyway.
--
People thought cybersex was a safe alternative,
until patients started presenting with sexually
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You'd think that but there's a case in Maryland that's dealing with a motorcyclist recording a very public traffic stop with a helmet cam. They came to his house at 5AM to remove all his photographic equipment. Very ugly, still in the courts, AFAIK.
http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20100420/1041329109.shtml
Forcing cops to care about something they obviously don't care about isn't going to work out well for the OP, I am afraid. Their likely response is to look for some illegal behavior of the OP to cite THEM with. A long time ago I got a lecture from my friend's dad, a photographer for the NY Daily News who said "Never piss off a cop for any reason. They've got guns." It was good advice.
I would suggest an anonymous call to an insurance fraud hotline. Storing illegal fireworks on the premises puts THEM at financial risk, meaning they have a real dog in this hunt, unlike the cops, the DA, etc. While they are really looking for people who've filed false claims, they will be interested in someone who's taking risks they haven't factored into their premiums. At least more interested than any random cop.
http://www.insurancefraud.org/insurer_hotlines.htm
When the bad neighbor gets a visit from a insurance rep and the rates go up, be prepared for retaliation.
Of course, I would NEVER go through official channels on something like this. I'd seek out frontier justice although once you've filed an official complaint, FJ is likely to backfire. At least the OP's learned for the next time. Smile, don't complain, take notes, then revenge.
-- Bobby G.
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As you said still in the courts. Be interesting to see if someone all of a sudden changes well over 30 years of precedent. I am really surprised that they pushed this since it could just as easily be used as precedent against their dash cams.
--
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They
This was clearly retaliatory prosecution and is a good reminder that police and prosectors can be extremely vindictive when the mood takes them. It's being closely watched by journalists and others since it's got the potential to force some serious changes in the status quo. Legislators like the anti-recording laws since it protects their lying asses more often than not. It will be a hard sell to them to get the laws changed.
I once had my pocket tape recorder running when I was pulled over by state troopers who were engaging in drag racing late at night. I advised them, according to article 66 1/2 that I was recording the conversation and that I had observed them drag racing. A supervisor was called. He asked me to surrender the tape. I refused. The watch commander was called. I still refused. They wrote me a ticket for speeding (I was, but only to "get the story") and let me go.
The case went all the way up to the chief of the Circuit Court, who at the time was the boss of my sister, the judge. I didn't beat the ticket, but the chief judge reamed out the troopers involved right in the courtroom because in the end, I think he believed that they *were* drag racing so it was worth it. My editor refused to run the story in the end and I moved on to another newspaper. The helmet guy might have avoided trouble by putting them "on notice" by announcing, as the law IIRC, demands, that he was making a record of events. My suspicion is that the State's atty. is just hoping this unfortunate case will fade away. I doubt it.
-- Bobby G.
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Beside the point. This particular case is based more on search and seizure than privacy and is also related to the cops. If the Supremes do say you can't attach GPS w/o warrant (50-50 given this court), when you parse it out, it'll say roughly that the GPS is the equivalent of the ladder we discussed earlier. If the technology is there, it is already legal to use more passive systems, for instance traffic cams or similar, to track a person to your little heart's content. As recognized by the Supreme Court in United States vs. Knotts 368 U.S. 276, 281-82 (1983): "A person traveling in an automobile on public thoroughfares has no reasonable expectation of privacy in his movements from one place to another. When [an individual] traveled over the public streets he voluntarily conveyed to anyone who wanted to look the fact that he was traveling over particular roads in a particular direction, and the fact of his final destination when he exited from public roads onto private property." Following this reasoning courts, for the most part, have allowed police to videotape individuals on public roads. They can put them under surveillance and follow them around as long as the overtime holds out. *IF* they say this is okay in this case, it will be interesting to see how it parses out since it was put on the car in a public parking lot.
--
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until patients started presenting with sexually
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On 6/27/2011 2:36 PM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

There was an interesting case a while back when a fellow found a tracking device on his vehicle and removed it. Some law enforcement types, I think feds, showed up and asked for its return. Another guy found one and stuck it on a long haul truck at a truck stop and it traveled quite far before those tracking it figured out what was up. A man I know who owns a muffler shop had a city police car in for a muffler replacement and his mechanic found a tracker under the cop car. It caused a little bit of a stir because nobody knew where it came from or who was involved in planting the device.
TDD
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Kurt Ullman wrote:

No, no, no. It depends on the jurisdiction. For example, some states (i.e., Maryland) require two-party consent to record a conversation.
Here's an article, just today, on recording apps for your iPhone including warnings about where this is not legal: http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2011/06/policing-the-police-the-smartphone-apps-that-let-you-spy-on-cops/240916/
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