OT: Home Town Auto Service

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I went to a new car sales and service because I knew the service writer in the department. I asked for a specific front-end guy (Steve) but did not ge t him. I told them also that I was hearing a metallic "clank" in the front. After half hour I was told they couldn't do the alignment because there was a worn tie-rod on the driver's side and the inner CV joint was leaking gre ase! The "tech" was explaining how the trans-axle and CV joints work (altho ugh he didn't know what CV meant!). I told him "constant velocity" and that the inner joint moves in and out and the outer moves up and down. I asked to raise the car again...he pointed-out the grease, which appeared to be sp rayed on the boot! I found no hole in the boot and no play in the tie-rod. At this point he found I had a broken coil on the left strut...the only rea l problem (and the noise I was hearing). Make-up a problem and not see the most important one! I took the car to my mechanic, who replaced both struts and found nothing w rong with anything else. I then had it 4-wheel aligned by another local that did a fine job without issue. I had not used them prior...but intend to now!
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On Friday, April 8, 2016 at 3:11:58 PM UTC-4, bob_villain wrote:

get him. I told them also that I was hearing a metallic "clank" in the fron t.

rease! The "tech" was explaining how the trans-axle and CV joints work (alt hough he didn't know what CV meant!). I told him "constant velocity" and th at the inner joint moves in and out and the outer moves up and down. I aske d to raise the car again...he pointed-out the grease, which appeared to be sprayed on the boot! I found no hole in the boot and no play in the tie-rod . At this point he found I had a broken coil on the left strut...the only r eal problem (and the noise I was hearing). Make-up a problem and not see th e most important one!

I took a car to a local tire-store chain to have the brakes looked at. It was mid-winter and I was planning on finding out what the problem was before deciding if I wanted to take care of it myself.
The tech comes out, stands next to the manager and says "You have a caliper that's sticking. We need to replace it and we really should replace them as a pair."
Me: "Are you sure it's the caliper and not just a sticky slider pin?"
Tech: "Oh, you can't replace the slider pin, you have to replace the entire caliper."
Me: (looking at the manager) "Is that true?"
Manager: (looking rather sheepish) Well...you see...umm...err...
Me: "I thought so. Please have *someone else* put the wheels back on my car . I don't want him touching my car again."
Manager: "Yes sir, I'll take care of it myself."
Now, in the end, it did turn out to be the caliper, but the fact that the tech lied right to my face about not being able to replace just the slider pin was enough for me to walk out.
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On 4/8/2016 4:10 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I think you were right to walk out.
Some times brakes stick when the angled slide (Clare can provide the proper name) gets some rust on it.
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On Fri, 8 Apr 2016 17:59:17 -0400, Stormin Mormon

of the slides are solid metal held in with pins, and some are "composite" wedges with rubber in them and "knobbies" on the end that hold the sliders in..
We just called them caliper pins and caliper sliders in the trade - or sliders and pins for the round ones, and slider wedges for the others. the SAE likely has some fancy nomenclature for them.
The recommended twice a year servicing/lubricating generally prevents them from sticking, and catches most sticky ones before they cause serious damage. Checking/cleaning/lubricating as required spring and fall can extend the life of disk brakes significantly.
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On 4/8/2016 8:29 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

My sister had a car where the brakes would not release properly. She found that if she slammed down on the brake pedal, some times they would release. My thought was to take the caliper off, brush, sand, and grease the heavy metal where the caliper and the car slid back and forth.
Knowing her (total yuppie) she took the car to a shop, and paid amazing buckets of money for a total brake job and financial hosing.
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On Friday, April 8, 2016 at 8:29:14 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I'm not sure what you mean by "Some of the slides are solid metal held in with pins,..." It's probably just a matter of the terminology, but what do mean when you say the slides are held in with pins?
I thought slides and pins were basically one and the same as shown here:
http://images.buzzillions.com/images_customers/03/98/27571703_200875_raw.jpg

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On Fri, 8 Apr 2016 19:30:25 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

that fit between the caliper and the caliper frame to hold the caliper in and allow the caliper to slide. They were held in place with little "hairpins" that kept them from sliding out. One pin through each end of each slider. There were other manufacturers that did the same, and might still be.
here is a set from a renault:
http://americanbrakecorp.com/brake_pads_anti_ratle_clips.html - Go to the second last full row from the bottom - in the middle of the row., labelled "Wedge Caliper -Short- Renault 9/18 (Brake Pad 7261, 005) "
Middle of the sixth row down, labelled "Ford F-150 2001-2002/Expedition 2002, FMSI D702-7576 (2 pcs - 1 wheel) " is the composite slider I mentioned. - used to be a common Ford design.
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On Friday, April 8, 2016 at 11:05:56 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

OK, I see that you were talking about a totally different kind of slider than I am used to. The Ford's, Mitsubishi's and Honda's I've worked on all had slightly different versions of the "slider pins" that I pictured above.
Maybe you can explain why Honda uses these spring clips on the Element but not on their Odysseys or Civics (at least not the model years I've worked on). Only SWMBO's 03 Element has them. (Some Acura's have them too.)
I understand their purpose, but I don't understand why only some models use them. If they are such a good idea, why aren't they used on all models?
It's a real pain to hold the pads on while trying to install the calipers.
http://tinyurl.com/E-Spring-Clips
Full Link:
http://lh3.ggpht.com/ljoffe/SBPTJRdWbJI/AAAAAAAAD-E/iQ2jL4rrip4/s800/IMG_1050.JPG
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On Fri, 8 Apr 2016 20:48:57 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Just a guess. Don't spend the extra 7 cents per wheel if not required.
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On Friday, April 8, 2016 at 11:59:41 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I can't say if they are required or not but they came on the vehicle and the pads, even non-OEM pads, have the holes for them.
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On Fri, 8 Apr 2016 21:05:28 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

where the figure they are not needed. Myself? I'd install them if they are avaialable to fit the vehicle whether they were initially installed or not.
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On 4/9/2016 1:18 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Eight old trailing messages. Long since time to trim excess text.
Also, not on topic for a home repair list.
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On my '74 Corvette, for example, the pads can be changed simply by removing the clip, sliding out the pin and pulling the pads all without the need to remove the caliper. The only real pain was getting the car in the air because the actual pad replacement was a piece of cake.
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On Sat, 09 Apr 2016 13:11:34 -0500, Gordon Shumway

- but not as bad as on an early Jag or Rover TC
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On Sat, 09 Apr 2016 14:16:00 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Except, later, when I replaced the rotors I also replaced the calipers with stainless steel versions because the bores were corroded and leaking past the seals. I guess that's what you get when you only put on a few miles a year. It's still fun to light up the tires every once in a while. :-)
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bad flexible brake lines can have interior detoriation where it acts like a check valve.
brakes go on and cant come off. i happened to me and a friends daughter......
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wrote:

flex hose rusted and swelled, pinching off the hose in the fitting. Made the brakes slow to apply - and then stay on virtually forever. Only way to get the car into the shop after the tow truck dropped it off in one case was to open the bleeder screws untill I found the one that was stuck.
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One replay on topic...nice work a-holes!
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On 04/09/2016 06:49 AM, bob_villain wrote:

The subject of your post was prefixed with "OT:". Doesn't that meant we can take it even more off-topic?
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On Saturday, April 9, 2016 at 7:07:57 AM UTC-5, Wallace wrote:

OT "means" you have the choice not to view it!
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