OT HIghway Patrol cars

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OT HIghway Patrol cars
This is especially directed at my fellow old codgers, but anyone can join in.
I've been watching reruns of Highway Patrol with Broderick Crawford for the past few months.
I really like them. Some parts are more realistic than average, and others are less realistic. For example, they're almost never in a hurry, even when a baby can't breathe.
But one thing gets me. The police cars are all full-size (since that's almost all that existed in the 50's. But they are all 2-door.
Did any police have 2-door cars?
When they arrest someone, they put him in the back seat, usually with his hands cuffed behind him, but not always iirc. Sometimes maybe they put him in the front seat. I forget.
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wrote:

In the 50s they just shot them and threw them in the trunk.
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I recall two door police cars back then. When I lived in Philly years ago, the called for the Paddy Wagon to take the prisoners.
I know that our grade school janitor bought an old Ford (maybe late 40's) police car and it was two doors, maybe even a coupe. Hard to recall details from 50+ years ago.
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wrote:

My mother bought a '58 Ford Fairlane 500 with what the salesman called an Interceptor Engine, which he said was used on police cars. It might have even said Interceptor right on the engine. It was a demonstrator (do they still have those?) and had maybe 1 or 2000 miles on it, and it was the end of the year, so she got a good price. It makes sense that they would use a car with their biggest engine as a demonstrator It did have a big v-8 and a 4-barrel carburetor and was probably one of the fastest cars on the street then, though my mother never tried to find out. She did like, however, that it had so much pep.
Paul, .
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http://tinyurl.com/3oxsjwg
nb
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Thanks. I think we might have the bigger one, the 352ci with 300hp. But my mother wasn't going to try for max speed and when I started driving at 16, neither was I. :-)
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mm wrote:

they have press cars. i have one, a 94 vette that was one of the press fleet in 93 so one of the first off the line. they sell them about in mid-year through the dealer chain. it was in a couple magazines of that year. my wife used to write for Vette so we'd get a new vette on loan for a week or so for 'testing' so she could write an article on it.
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wrote:

Very nice.
These come from Detroit, so there woudln't be as many of those. The demonstators like my mother got spent several months at the dealer, being driven by customers with the salesman sitting next to them, or maybe by customers alone, so each dealer, at least those who used demonstrators (all of them?) needed one of each major model.
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On 5/10/2011 3:37 PM, mm wrote:

Back when I was in college there was a guy who told me about his mother's Chrysler station wagon a 1968 I think that was special ordered with a 426 Hemi V8, bucket seats, floor shifter for the 727 automatic and I'm not sure about the rear end ratio but the fellow would take his mom's wagon to the drag strip on the week ends and eat all the stock vehicles alive without breathing hard. Don't you just love sleepers? ^_^
TDD
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On 5/11/2011 12:21 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Not quite at that level of speed, but for several years (until rust got it) I had a 78 Ford Fairmont 'fleet special' wagon with a 302 in it. Same Fox platform and underpinnings as a Mustang, so it was basically a Mustang 5.0 station wagon. Embarrassed more than one person who assumed it had the usual anemic straight-6 in it. One of the few cars I ever owned that I still miss.
--
aem sends...

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On 5/11/2011 10:21 PM, aemeijers wrote:

You just reminded me of the scariest car I ever drove. My late brother in law had a car belonging to his father which was a 302 Ford Maverick. It wasn't tricked out or anything like that, it was a common basic salesman car with a manual 3 speed on the column an no fancy suspension or performance parts or tires. It was so overpowered that it would burn the skinny little stock tires for a block and it handled like a brick which made it terrifying to drive. It could swap ends if you gave it a little too much gas, DANG, that was a fun car! ^_^
TDD
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On Wed, 11 May 2011 23:37:36 -0500, The Daring Dufas

You shuda tried a V-8 Gremlin. I had a six-banger and it was unstable enough. Driving the thing in snow resembled playing Carroms.
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On 5/10/2011 1:05 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

--
aem sends...


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On 5/10/11 5:31 AM, mm wrote:

I wonder how the practice of transporting prisoners in patrol cars developed. Into the 1960s, Baltimore's Cruising Patrols were trucks. A cop could sit in back to watch any prisoners, and the driver was isolated from them.
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I've read that BC was such an alcoholic by the time HP came along that they had to lean him against cars, trees and walls to keep him from falling down. If you look for it, the "propping up" is pretty easy to spot. At least he didn't go the bad SciFi movie route like Joan Crawford in Trog and so many other A-list actors that fell on hard times. No one fell quite so hard as Bela Lugosi into "Plan 9 from Outer Space."
-- Bobby G.
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OMG, that was so painful!! Never much liked JC. Thought she was kinda homely. Finally saw her in Mildred Pierce. WOW!! She deserved that Oscar.
(anyone but me notice the mouth/lips of Jessica Rabbit are the dead-nuts copy of a young Ann Blyth?)

Yes, but he was immortalized in the movie Ed Wood by Martin Landau, who deservedly won an academy award for his portrayal of Lugosi. You can still see all those old Lugosi movies on 2fer/$5 bargain DVDs and Netflix. The fact he became a caricature of himself is no one's fault. As an actor, he was strictly vaudeville, a throwback to the silent era, long dead.
nb
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On Tue, 10 May 2011 14:39:14 -0400, "Robert Green"

I don't know about that. I've been watching for months and rarely see a new episode anymore. He may have drunk off the set, but everything he does in the show seems appropriate to the setting. If there's a scene where he's lying on the ground to avoid getting shot, there's usually another scene just before that where he's walking in the woods, on a hill, looking quite stable. And I'll bet both scenes are shot in the same session.
There are 4 more shows this week. If I remember, I'll pay closer attention to this.

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wrote:

This show was maybe the first and only cop show set in rural areas (not counting the Andy Griffith show, and I guess that was not rural but small-town - they stayed mostly in Mayberry.) So it routinely takes 20 minutes for another car to get to where they are**.
This same notion has led them to leave a dead body alone in a field (or a wounded victim alone in his home iirc) while they go check out any lead they have, even just the closest store or gas station. I tend to think this is unrealistic, even then.
Do you folks think they would really leave a dead body alone? Was chain of custody was no big deal then? That is, no defense attorney would claim the body was tampered with while the police were gone?
Also, and probably most important, the show was only 30 minutes long (the way I like them) and they only show transporting when it comes in the middle of the show. When they catch the guy, the show usually ends within 30 seconds. The shortness of the show must have many consequences on the script, though I'll admit it doesn't seem to lead to weird things on Sea Hunt or the Patty Duke show.
**They never say what state they are in and when they show a map, often with 100 miles showing and many towns and/or cities, I've never been able to identify the location. In addition, once they were only 10 miles from Mexico, but another time they were on the route from Oregon to Chicago, and they've been other moderately identifiable locations too, maybe even Indiana, but never east of the Appalachian mountains, maybe not even east of the Mississippi, and never where people had a Southern accent.
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But in neither of these cases was the body alone in a field, after the cops got there and then left again, and before the coroner arrived, right?
Besides legal issues, I sort of thought that no one would do this because of respect for a dead body. OTOH, in a rural county wehre it takes 20 or 30 minutes for the cororner to get there, even after he starts the car, it would be a shame for the murderer to get away while the only cop nearby keeps watch on the body.
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On Tue, 10 May 2011 08:58:52 -0700, Smitty Two

Paul, it's one thing to have unrealistic direction and a different thing to have an unrealistic major prop, the cop car, so I decided to ask on the home repair newsgroup, where it's off topic but the sort of thing that interests a lot of the people here.

These are great pictures. A lot of two-door cars, more than half maybe.
On the tv show, I don't remember the siren or lights on top. On the show last night, they definitely weren't there, so I'll have to watch more closely. I'm a little surprised they didn't put them in, just for "excitement". Sirens were sometimes under the hood, but flashing blue lights behind the grill I thought didn't exist until after the time of this show. Of course I'd never been west of Indianapolis when I was 10 years old. Or even 16. They have a black cop in Tampa in 1958. That's pretty good.
One picture says that 2-way radios were rare at the time. In the late 50's? I didn't' think so. But one thing about the show is that in many episodes they will not start the car until they've finished talking on the radio, while the bad guys are getting away. They were actually in sight, so 30 or 60 seconds on the radio is going to give them a lot of time to hide. In a few episodes they will talk on the radio while driving, but I think maybe they thought it was dangerous.
The l955 CHP Buick looks just like a common cop car on the tv show.

That works out fine since the name of the show was Highway Patrol. :)
The closest I came to seeing this sort of thing was when we moved to suburban Indianapolis and the sheriff came to say hello. The sheriffs's office was the only police in Washington Township outside the city. He had a shotgun clipped to the dashboard.
When I lived until age 10 in a town of 58,000 in western Pa. I don't remember ever seeing a cop. Although I know they existed. They gave the mayor enough traffic tickets that his license was suspended, and he rented a buggy -- from an Amish man I think -- and drove the buggy to work every day until he got his license back.

That might be it, but because a show that dealt only with traffic tickets wouldn't' be very interesting, they have a much higher rate of serious criminals. Even among the violent criminals, the vast majority, more than half of them wear suits and ties, and they usually have a pretty girlfriend, some of whom are nastier than the men.
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