OT: Health insurance

Page 3 of 11  


Been there, done that, have the knife scars on my back (grin). I went around and around with both the hospital and nursing administration about the staffing form we were filling out to decide the unit's acuity. They did no studies of inter and intra rater reliability to see if they were filled out correctly. They did no other testing to see if it actually measured acuity.. especially since my own indicators (I was recently post-stats class whilst persuing my MHA at the time and acutely aware of all this stuff) suggested that they were cutting staff. '
--
America is at that awkward stage. It's too late
to work within the system, but too early to shoot
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<stuff snipped>

Just got an enormous and IMHO poorly planned survey from the USPS. Obviously geared to customer satisfaction there really wasn't anywhere to say "Everything's 100% OK with my delivery service EXCEPT when the regular letter carrier is away. Then it turns to crap." That's probably important for them to know, but I didn't see any questions among the dozens of questions covering the same subject in slightly different ways about it. Worse, still, the survey asked for numbers that couldn't possibly be anything but guesses from the respondent. Oh well.
For a while I was with a unit that designed surveys for DoD, many for the Council of Colonels. The most interesting results came in scrawled in cursive on the margins and even on the backs of the OCR forms (each of which we reviewed by hand). While I thought the "off-label" remarks described areas where our survey was deficient my boss thought the comments had to be studiously ignored, refusing to include them in the database of results. Reminds me of the lawyer who's asked "how much is two and two?" and responds "how much do you WANT it to be?"
--
Bobby G.




Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Affirmative action, as initially envisioned, only required people to go looking for minorities, etc. You could make the original law happy by going to (for instance) black colleges and universities looking to recruit people. It was only after the courts got involved that quotas, etc., were put in place.
--
America is at that awkward stage. It's too late
to work within the system, but too early to shoot
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/17/2013 10:53 PM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

The funniest 60 Minutes program episode I ever watched was about traditional Black universities recruiting White students and giving them full scholarships. When a group of very smart Black students were interviewed about the practice, they were very angry about the White students being given a free ride when they, the Black students had to work hard to get where they were and having to scrape up the money to attend college. The White students who got the scholarships were total morons who couldn't get into any other college because of their low grades. Oh the irony. ^_^
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 08-18-2013 01:06, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Hey, you want to counter the dingbats who think melanin is inversely proportional to intelligence, how better than to put some counter-examples in there?
Phil Donahue used to pull the same strategy. He'd get someone smart who agreed with him, and hunt up an imbecile to give "equal time" to the other side.
--
Wes Groleau

In any formula, constants (especially those obtained
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ah, that made my day. Thanks.
A white mind is a terrible thing to waste.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 8/18/2013 1:06 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Liberal logic: When companies choose to hire white people because of their race, it's racist. When the government mandates that companies hire black people because of their race, it's affirmaive action.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 8/17/2013 11:53 PM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<stuff snipped>

What CAN we damn the whole profession for? It's an AHR tradition! (-:
--
Bobby G.




Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

While some docs take death personally and will keep it going, most of the time this is more related to family or others not wanting to let Granny go (or other similar personal reasons having little or nothing to do with Granny's needs and/or wishes). I have already told my kids that I want zapped once if indicated and needed prior to 70 because I think that is too early to go. After that, don't break my ribs or do other BS. (That would of course change based on health issues. I am assuming good health overall) However, I don't see a time anytime soon where we would accept actively killing granny.

--
America is at that awkward stage. It's too late
to work within the system, but too early to shoot
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/16/2013 5:49 PM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

A living will is so important, and the more discussion with family, the better. It is absolutely one's own choice to make and folks can save their families a lot of grief in making their wishes known. If they want to hang on through and and every crisis, it is a matter also for families to participate in assuring clear, informed choices are made.
My mom was essentially tortured to death with radiation, chemo and resulting complications at age 82....she didn't get any explanation (informed consent) of treatment for malignant brain tumor, glioblastoma, beyond the expected length of survival with or without treatment. The oncologist was more than happy to offer treatment, as was the radiologist. Treatment was interrupted to place a stent in coronary artery for anginal pain. When she returned to the neurosurgeon during treatment for a check, he remarked in a very surprised tone "You are receiving chemo?". Damn. The best she could have gotten at the time was 19 mos, vs. 6 without treatment. She never complained of headaches or any other symptoms of the tumor, and they are not solid tumors like those that cause increased pressure inside the skull. That was 20 years ago, and even now it is a more treatable tumor but still almost always fatal....it grows like the nerve cells do, spider like throughout the brain, so not much in the way of surgery. At time of her diagnosis, she was happy and very active. Don't know what doing nothing would have been like, but I suspect she would just have faded away.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It isn't quite that straight forward in real life. I have seen many times when there was a living will or even the healthcare power of attorney where the wishes were not honored because other family members were raising all kinds of hell. It is easier (and safer) to cater to the more vociferous members of the family.

I do a lot of cancer-related writing. The headlines in the field (for many, but not all cancers) talk about the great 4 month survival advances. Ain't enough for me to worry about. If the 5 year survival ain't 40% or more, don't want to talk about it.
--
America is at that awkward stage. It's too late
to work within the system, but too early to shoot
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/16/2013 8:41 PM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

I didn't imply that it was simple....my family avoids discussing death, to a fault. My kids don't want to think about mine. I asked for input years ago, trying to figure what their thoughts would be when faced with certain situations.

At my age, the 5 year survival might not be that attractive, depending on quality of life during the ensuing 5 years :o) Transplant? No damn way.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That is why I said "talk about". Five year survival is just the first cut (grin)
--
America is at that awkward stage. It's too late
to work within the system, but too early to shoot
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<stuff snipped>

That's so sad.
The New York Magazine article is pretty scary because it makes it clear there's very little incentive NOT to pour on the coals and perform procedure after procedure on terminal patients. It brings in the Medicare bucks for doctors, hospitals and big Pharma so *they're* not going to stop the gravy train. It must have been pretty awful to watch your mom "dwindle" the way she did. Part of the problem is that people don't want to think about things like death, infirmity, long term care, etc. I forwarded that NYM article to a friend whose two parents are dying, one from dementia and one from pulmonary fibrosis and it's about as horrible a final act as you could ever imagine.
Another friend, 83, ended up in assisted living after a long stint in rehab after lying on the floor for three days with a broken wrist after a bad fall, unable to get up. It's amazing he survived. Though we talked often about his move to assisted living, it probably would still be just talk and would have never happened without an "incident." These are very complex and emotional issues and are very hard to consider dispassionately.
--
Bobby G.



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/16/2013 9:48 PM, Robert Green wrote:

There is still a lot of fight in a lot of sick elderly :o) My mom was fully prepared to die after her diagnosis, but royally pissed that she had to be in bed to do it :o) She was a fighter, not in the brutal or abusive way, which is probably why she took on chemo and radiation without question.
A family friend, in nursing home at age 88, had a go-round with his son because pop's driver license was ready to expire and he wasn't going to let it expire without a fight. I almost forgot the trip my mom took around the block (without me) to prove to herself during cancer treatment that she could still drive, although walking was becoming very iffy due to weakness.
I've seen (and held hands with) quite a few elderly who were down and out when they came into nursing home but rallied with some patience and support.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
message wrote in message

They are indeed but they need to be addressed. Another one is euthanasia.
My niece's 3 year new hubby was just diagnosed with ALS (Lou Gehrig disease). He is 56 and is now a walking dead man, average 39 month survival.
For those unfamiliar with the disease, it prevents renewal of muscle tissue resulting in gradually declining ability to control voluntary muscular action. Breathing is one such action. The victim loses the ability to walk...to move arms and hands...to eat...to talk...to breathe. Eating and breathing can be accomplished artificially but the patient ultimately succumbs to something, often pneumonia. And even though artificial means can help eating and breathing, the patient can do nothing...can't move, can't talk. All they can do is lie there motionless and think...hour after hour, day after day, week after week...
I had another friend a number of years ago. When she got to the lie there and think stage she somehow managed to convey her desire for death to her husband. He obliged, smothering her with a pillow. Myself and others wrote to the sentencing judge urging leniency; he was sentenced to five years probation with the proviso that he spend one night a year - the night of his dead wife's birthday - in jail. Seemed fair to me.
If I ever had this disease I would off myself before I got to the "lie there and think" stage. I would far rather be able to avail myself of legal euthanasia; easier on me, easier on the survivors.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My grand father died of ALS, I saw him in some of the early stages. He could walk, but not lift his arms. In my grand father's case, they chose not to use respirator.
Another LDS friend (I drive by his house every few days on the way to other places) died of ALS. In the friend's case, they did. I visited him in bed, and brought him news from the church. He seemed to like to hear what was going on.
Didn't look like a good way to go.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 8/17/2013 9:20 AM, dadiOH wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/17/2013 8:20 AM, dadiOH wrote:

You could always drink hemlock like Socrates but you would have to sentence yourself to death. I always thought suicide was a crime and I always wondered how a dead person could be punished? O_o
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<stuff snipped>

Tuesday is Soylent Green day! Mass privation from some natural disaster could change the entire world overnight. I'm betting on the Yellowstone supervolcano being the next big game-changer. The entire population of the US could end up living in a "Logan's Run" environmental dome. "Fish and sea greens, plankton and protein from the sea!" (-:
--
Bobby G.



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/16/2013 11:25 PM, Robert Green wrote:

Or global warming.....Iowa is the new Arizona, anyone? With ocean-front lots? ;o)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.