OT Has anyone in the group ever had to verify your signature on a credit card receipt?

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If someone used your card without your permission, would that not already be fraud? Just wonder how often a signature dispute comes up.
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One time only. On a European trip I had a Visa card stolen. I called the issuing credit union from there. When I got home there was only one charge made the day of the theft that I had not made. The CU had the original slip. I was asked to sign my name five times. They looked at my sig, looked at the credit card slip and said " Ok we will charge it back to the shop that had accepted the card."
By the way, I had gone to the police station (we were leaving that day ) and managed to get a police report. I had it with me when I went to the CU.
I still have that report. It was my souvenir from the Rome police.
Charlie
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On Mon, 27 Jun 2011 16:32:50 -0400, Metspitzer wrote:

I have used someone else's credit card only a few times (4-5 tops) and never had a problem. Even when people check the photo ID they have only checked the photo 4-5 times. I bet I could borrow my son's ID and credit card and not have a problem, even if I write on the card to check photo ID. I had that on my card for about 2 years and NOBODY checked the photo against my face, only compared names.
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On Mon, 27 Jun 2011 17:57:43 -0500, Michael Dobony

I am guessing it is more for the clerk to match the front signature with the back, but they are not exactly the CSI type.
I think putting a picture ID would be much more effective. Now a days, you could email a photo to the card company.
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wrote:

There's a signature on the front?

Maybe they can cancel all those bloody shows adn they can work as clerks.

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wrote:

LOL.

In the USA, a signature does not have to be legible or in English or the Latin alphabet. It can be in a foreign alphabet like Greek, Hebrew, Chinese, that no one at the store can read.
This includes your checking account and I'm sure contracts and everything else.
I'll bet the laws that say this encompass using no alphabet, like a smiley face, and that that is legal too. As in the cowboy movies, "Make your mark."
"X" is legal for illiterates and others.
Personally I think it should be remembered and farily reproducible by the signer or he's going to have troubles. :)
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I have LifeLock. On the back of all my cards, I have VERIFY SIGNATURE. If a clerk does NOT verify my signature, I call for the manager, and usually get some very good results. At the least, I get the clerk's attention and teach them something new.
Steve
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Metspitzer wrote:

Hmmm, Signature? Been using PIN long time already.
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On 6/27/2011 4:32 PM, Metspitzer wrote:

Only once, for me too. Actually, I always sign my credit cards with my full 1st name, middle initial and full last name. However, I sign all credit vouchers and electronic credit units 1st initial only, middle initial and full last name. This gives me a check, if there's a disputed credit charge, by looking at the signature. If it's signed like on the card, it's not me. As I said, only once, a teller sort of complained. A friend of mine signs his credit card with the phrase "ask for identification." He then signs the voucher or machines with his signature. He said no one ever asks for ID, etc. either.
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I recently ate at a restaurant that only took credit cards if you also gave them a driver's license. But not to compare the signature. They brought back the license with the card before I signed the check.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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wrote:

gave
NEVER EVER NEVER EVER let your license or your CC leave your sight. That's when the cards are skimmed by portable scanners and your license quickly photographed by cell phone cameras. Police are forever busting up rings of waitstaff that earn considerable money from criminal gangs. What they really want is your 3 or 4 digit code on the back of your card. I always pay with cash at restaurants. The risk is just too high that someone's going to sell your card data to some criminal gang. Cuts out the infamous double billing scams, too. I always make sure I have a mix of bills too, so that the famous "disappearing waiter" trick isn't pulled on me where they hope you'll just get tired of waiting and leave without your change.
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1602245/posts
WASHINGTON -- Restaurants in the D.C. metropolitan area are working with Secret Service agents to shut down a credit card-skimming scheme, and authorities said each business was hit from the inside.
Managers at the DuClaw Brewing Company and Pizzeria Uno at the Bowie Town Center in Bowie, Md., Jasper's in Largo, Md., and the Red, Hot and Blue restaurant in Arlington, Va., had no idea their customers were being victimized.
Authorities said a network of waiters working at the four restaurants used a device called a skimmer to swipe customers' credit cards. By using the device, authorities said the waiters were able to capture the customers' credit card numbers as well as other private information about the card owners. Then authorities said that information was used to make illegal purchases.
NEVER EVER EVER let your credit card or license leave your sight.
http://www.google.com/search?q=restaurant+credit+card+skimming+schemes
-- Bobby G.
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Geez, and this is old news. I first heard about this practice about 15 yrs ago.
nb
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Sorry, I don't want to leave my guests, get up and follow a server through a labyrinthine maze back to the credit card machine. I use LifeLock, plus my VISA allows me to not pay any disputed charge.
Werks fer me.
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wrote

a
my
I meant to write credit card AND license. Sorry. I was in shock that anyone would surrender both documents to a waiter/waitress and let them disappear for a time. (Sorry Don W. - too many years reporting crime have made me *very* paranoid. You're free to take any level of risk you're comfortable with, but there is a possibility you're unaware of how vulnerable the restaurant customer is to skimming.)
Let me ask you this, Steve: Would you let both your driver's license AND your CC leave your sight in a restaurant?
I ask that because in my limited but still substantial experience, restaurants are the absolute NEXUS of lower-than-minimum wage, transient, possibly illegal, possibly ex-felon employees. Add a bar and you've added potential pimping, drug dealing, gambling along with other activities that require money. A high res image of your license is a get-out-of-jail card for an ex-con or squint. They can use your license to convince the police that they are you long enough to escape custody and leave you stuck paying the bill. The criminal bill. But it's quite possible that other people don't see restaurants in quite the same light. (-:
< http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3078488/ns/technology_and_science-tech_and_gadgets/t/darkest-side-id-theft / >
<<Malcolm Byrd was home with his two children on a Saturday night when a knock came at the door. Three Rock County, Wis., sheriff's officers were there with a warrant for Byrd's arrest. Cocaine possession, with intent to distribute, it said. Byrd tried to tell them that they had the wrong man, that it was a case of mistaken identity, that he was a victim of identity theft. But they wouldn't listen. Instead they put him in handcuffs and drove him away. Again. It was nothing new for Byrd, who has spent much of the past five years trying - unsuccessfully - to talk skeptical police officers out of arresting him. But this time, it was worse. Two days later, he was still in jail.>>
I wouldn't count on VISA or LifeLock being able to reverse the physical act of being incarcerated for 2 days nor the incredibly bad effect it can have on your life.
The above cited article goes on to say:
<<There's nothing new about criminals using aliases to evade the law - criminals often try to give their buddy's name, address, and date of birth to dupe police. But the explosion of identity theft, and the ready availability of stolen digital dossiers on innocent victims, makes it just as easy for a criminal to give a stranger's personal data during an arrest. Once police book a suspect under a fake name, that mistake can plague a victim for life. "The alias becomes a disease to the true owner of that character," said Sgt. Bob Berardi, head of the Identity Theft task force in Los Angeles.>>
I am pretty sure (but memory loss is plaguing me) that you can request a manual imprinter be brought to your table. VISA merchant agreements are the product of a lot of legal man hours and contain clauses that relate to bad experiences of unhappy merchants and customers.
Restaurants clearly are a business different from most other card operations. That's an interesting enough question for me to call VISA today and ask them what my options are at restaurants and whether I can request they bring a manual imprinter to my table. What they'll say is "you are protected from fraudulent charges" but that doesn't address what they can do with an image of your license. I'll make a point to ask if they can demand to take you license away, too. I doubt it. I would imagine the contracts reads "must present or display" ID but not "surrender to server."
I agree that it's inconvenient to go to the front desk to execute the transaction, but not much more than taking a leak. If for some reason I was out of cash, I would take the precaution because of the steepness of the down side. The only place I surrender my license - briefly - is at the bank's drive-in window where I can actually see the teller for the whole time. Bank employees are usually less likely to have a criminal record because of the nature of their work.
But all those hassles disappear when you use the Franklin card. Cold, hard cash. Plus, you don't leave a transaction trail in the incredibly invasive world of customer behavior tracking. There are plenty of good places to use credit cards. But restaurants clearly aren't your best bet because of the seemingly endless string of skimming rings arrest stories:
http://www.google.com/search?q=restaurant+credit+card+skimming+schemes
Eight plead guilty in credit card-skimming scheme Jun 11, 2009 ... Eight people involved in a credit card-skimming scheme which netted more than $700000 from customers of area restaurants pleaded guilty ...
Police Uncover Credit Card-Skimming Scheme Mar 24, 2006 ... WASHINGTON -- Restaurants in the D.C. metropolitan area are working with Secret Service agents to shut down a credit card-skimming scheme, ...
May 9, 2011 ... 36000 Credit Card Numbers Stolen In Skimmer Scheme ... There are 36000 victims, in a major credit card skimming operation, and Orange County ...
2 Arrested In Credit Card 'Skimming' Scheme - News Story - WFTV ... Sep 15, 2009 ... Officers are trying to track down the restaurant employees ...
Restaurant Worker Pleads Guilty in Credit Card Scheme | NBC Washington Jul 31, 2010 ... In the summer of 2008, Ward paid two other servers she had recruited at the restaurant to help her in the scheme. Using credit card skimming ...
I know that people are obsessed with racking up airline miles but with what I know about restaurants and what I see in the news, they're not an especially safe place to use a card BECAUSE it's one of the few places where a card does leave your sight.
As for relying on LifeLock? I wouldn't do that either:
http://www.ftc.gov/opa/2010/03/lifelock.shtm
LifeLock Will Pay $12 Million to Settle Charges by the FTC and 35 States That Identity Theft Prevention and Data Security Claims Were False
LifeLock, Inc. has agreed to pay $11 million to the Federal Trade Commission and $1 million to a group of 35 state attorneys general to settle charges that the company used false claims to promote its identity theft protection services, which it widely advertised by displaying the CEO's Social Security number on the side of a truck.
Life's too short to spend 2 days in jail because I got careless with my personal information.
-- Bobby G.
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Yes. One can't go through life worrying about little things. All credit card companies will reverse fraudulent charges. Not to mention that frequent flier miles are nice to get and I stopped carrying coins long ago. Any place where I use cash is in even dollars.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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Me, too. I have absolute faith in the algorithms that they use to ferret out fraudulent claims, largely because they freeze my card at times even when I make the charges. I started calling them to let them know when I was going to Florida since entry into the Sunshine state seems to automatically offend the computers (grin).
--
People thought cybersex was a safe alternative,
until patients started presenting with sexually
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wrote:

Read a copy of the merchant's agreement with the cc company. They are forbidden to ask for any ID to use the card. The only requirement is that the card be signed. If not signed, the card is to be considered invalid. Read the agreement for further info.
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Thanks. I just filed a complaint at: http://www.mastercard.us/support/merchant-violations.html
Now I don't remember whether the license was just looked at or taken away with the card. This was some months back. I do know I told my luncheon companion that I would not eat there again because of it.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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On Fri, 01 Jul 2011 15:47:55 -0700, Smitty Two

It's not for your protection that the merchant violates the agreement they signed. It is for their protection as fraudulent use of a card does not cost the legitimate holder a dime. I refuse all requests for DL or other ID. I have challenged Wal-Mart thru MasterCharge and received an apology from corporate and they no longer request additional ID. Challenged Dobbs Tire and received a written apology from corporate. The best was Lowe's. I challenged them when they demanded DL after purchase was approved by MC. I refused and they withheld merchandise but did not reverse charge. They settled for $4,650.00. The disputed charge was $27.54. How many times have you seen the merchant compare the card sig with the charge sig? That is required by the agreement but is almost universally ignored. If the card is not signed, it is considered invalid and the merchant must require that the card by signed in their presence before acceptance. Another consumer fallacy is marking "See ID" on the card. That makes the card invalid as it has been altered. I learned quite a bit about the proper acceptance of CC's during the negotiations w/Lowe's attorneys.
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