OT: GOP Voter Fraud Accusations Suddenly Blowing Up In Their Faces

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Republican officials, who have used hysteria about alleged voter fraud as an excuse to support measures that disproportionately block Democratic voters, are furiously trying to distance themselves from a growing number of GOP voter registration drives that either submitted false applications or threw away authentic ones.
The incidents might have been overlooked if not for the GOP's clamorous campaign to restrict registration drives, purge voter rolls, roll back early voting, and pass voter ID laws that opponents point out have the effect of depressing the vote among minorities, the poor and other generally Democratic constituencies.
As one Southern California alt-weekly put it, it's turning into a story of "The Wolf Who Cried Wolf."
The latest drama began to unfold on Oct. 17, when the manager of a Tuesday Morning discount store in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley saw a man throwing a garbage bag into the store's private dumpster. Inside the bag was a file folder containing eight completed Virginia voter registration forms.
The manager described the man to Rockingham County sheriff's deputies, who the following day arrested Colin Small, 23, a voter registration drive contractor for the Virginia GOP -- and charged him with eight felonies and five misdemeanors related to the destruction and disclosure of the applications and obstruction of justice.
A few weeks earlier, the GOP had been under fire following reports of suspicious registration applications that had been submitted in 10 Florida counties by a company run by Nathan Sproul, a Republican operative who has long been trailed by allegations of voter fraud. The Republican Party paid Sproul's company, Strategic Allied Consulting, about $3 million this year for registration drives in five swing states: Colorado, Florida, North Carolina, Nevada, and Virginia.
In Palm Beach County, Fla., alone, about 100 questionable voter registrations were flagged, more than half of which involved changing a voterΉs party affiliation to Republican or independent. Discrepancies were also found in North Carolina.
And a viral video uploaded to YouTube in late September showed a young woman who worked for Strategic Allied Consulting registering voters in Colorado and admitting that she was only looking for Republicans. "Well, I'm actually trying to register people for a particular party. Because we're out here in support of Romney, actually," the woman said.
Given Sproul's history, it could hardly have come as a surprise to his GOP employers that his canvassers would generate spurious applications.
And yet, because every bit of the process of voting has now become so politically supercharged, once the allegations of voter registration fraud became public, the Republican National Committee and its state chapters quickly severed their ties with Sproul.
"We've made it clear we're not doing business with these guys anymore," Sean Spicer, the RNC communications director, told Michael Isikoff of NBC News. "We've come out pretty strong against this kind of stuff -- and we have zero tolerance for this."
As for Small, who was first hired by Sproul's group, the RNC this week simultaneously denied he was working directly for them and announced that he'd been fired.
On Friday, RNC Chairman Reince Priebus told HuffPost's Amanda Terkel: "If it's true, the guy should be punished. He was fired, and he should have been fired. There's no tolerance for this stuff."
Republican Party of Virginia Chairman Pat Mullins released a statement saying Small's actions were "a direct contradiction of both his training and explicit instructions given to him."
Democratic National Committee Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz, by contrast, issued her own statement, calling Small's arrest just another example of "a concerted effort by the RNC and its allies to win the game by rigging it altogether."
And three Democratic congressmen from Virginia on Tuesday sent a letter to the Justice Department requesting "a multi-state investigation to determine if a pattern of voting registration irregularities related to Strategic Allied Consulting are connected and constitute a broader conspiracy of voter registration fraud."
The frequency of allegations "would seem to suggest something more than the isolated acts of 'a few bad apples,'" they wrote.
Voter registration fraud is different, way more common and considerably less threatening to democracy than actual voter fraud. Registering Mickey Mouse to vote is easy, and a far cry from actually casting a fraudulent ballot.
The main reason voter registration fraud is so common is that canvassers are sometimes rewarded based on how many applications they submit -- which can incentivize padding. That's what happened fairly frequently with Acorn, the community group that Republicans demonized as a fraud factory after it successfully registered over a million mostly inner-city residents before the 2008 election -- with some imaginary and dead people mixed in.
Priebus himself recently cited the example of Acorn to support his argument that "Democrats know they benefit from election fraud."
But Acorn, unlike Strategic Allied Consulting, actually self-reported its canvassers' suspicious applications -- which it was legally obligated to submit nonetheless. The ones from Sproul's groups, on the other hand, were spotted by election officials.
And the Colorado video, combined with the fact that the suspicious Palm Beach applications featured so many party switches, suggest that Sproul's group might have added a new wrinkle: rewarding its canvassers for applications from Republicans or independents, but not from Democrats.
What none of that explains, however, is what might have motivated Small -- who, after all, didn't submit fraudulent applications; he's charged with throwing out legitimate ones.
Because Virginia doesn't register people by party, "it's not possible to tell a party affiliation just by looking at the voter registration form," said state board of elections spokeswoman Nikki Sheridan, ruling out one potential answer.
The eight applicants varied in age, and the rural area where they live is overwhelming white, ruling out two more.
So as it turns out, although county officials won't confirm it on the record, the most likely possibility may be that Small was throwing the applications away because he'd waited longer than the statutory 15 days after he collected them to turn them in, and was afraid of getting in trouble.
Virginia's guidelines for voter registration drives clearly state that failure to turn in completed applications within 15 days can lead to prosecution for a misdemeanor.
Small, although he was released from jail not long after his arrest, could not be reached for comment.
Sheridan, from the state board of elections, said that the eight applications found in the dumpster were processed by local officials that same day.
As it turned out, three of the applicants were already registered, and one was rejected on account of a felony conviction. But four of them will now be newly on the voter rolls in November.
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I've been hearing rumors that the repubs are targeting precincts that have polling places with around 3 workers. Such polling places usually have low voter turnout and during the lulls, if all the workers are repubs, they can supposedly "vote" for those that haven't.
Just saying
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On Oct 26, 4:21 pm, "Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds" <atlas-

I've been hearing rumors that Obama is stunned that Romney is pulling ahead and it's got you libs in a tizzy. Hence, here you are, bitching about states that try to make sure only those qualified to vote do so.
And another thing. I'd say that when men and women can give their lives for this country that it's not too much to ask that anyone showing up at a polling place have proper identification. Almost everyone legally entitled to vote already has such ID. And if they don't it sure doesn't seem like a big barrier to get an ID for anyone that really gives a damn about the country. Now, if you're an illegal alien, then that may be a different story.
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Please tell me who is "disenfranchised" by ensuring that people who are not eligible to vote, don't vote.

A totally bogus claim. Without any form of positive ID, it's impossible to tell.

Pretty nearly every politician running for office in Chicago...

How do you suppose evidence of a problem could be collected in the absence of any requirement that voters provide positive ID?
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On 10/26/2012 6:23 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

Didn't our Affirmative Action Attorney General refuse to prosecute Black Panther members who prevented people from voting? O_o
TDD
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Yeah, but they were liberals. Makes it all OK. According to some, that is.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Didn't our Affirmative Action Attorney General refuse to prosecute Black Panther members who prevented people from voting? O_o
TDD
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That's a classic lib tactic. The New Black Panthers had thugs weilding baseball bats standing outside polling places in Philly in 2008. There is direct video evidence of it and I've seen the video with my own eyes. There are also numerous eyewitnesses, including the police.
Now, only the most partisan lib kook would try to dismiss that as "Too much Fox news", while at the same time bitching about requiring voters to present ID as "voter intimidation". Have you no shame? But keep it up. It's exactly those tactics that enough Americans see right through and are fed up with that are going to help cost Obama the election.
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On 10/27/2012 10:02 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Baseball bats? Is this something Limbaugh told you about?
http://tpmmuckraker.talkingpointsmemo.com/2010/11/new_black_panther_shows_back_up_at_philly_polling.php
http://preview.tinyurl.com/37qwd9r
At least all of this red vs blue stuff is good for a laugh...

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OK, it was not a baseball bat, it was a night stick. Does that change anything? If anything, it's worse, because at least with a baseball back one could claim they stopped by the polling place on the way back from a baseball game.
Feel better now?
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On 10/26/2012 8:09 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

How would two mean folks standing in front of a polling place holding night sticks disenfranchise voters?
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On 10/27/2012 8:24 AM, George wrote:

That's funny, Liberals complained that their own vermin were prevented from voting because there was a police station a mile away from a polling place. ^_^
TDD
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On 10/27/2012 10:45 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Fortunately the red and blue "teams" that make the most noise are in the minority and it is good for a laugh hearing the childish bickering . Most normal folks are not nearly that polarized.
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On 10/27/2012 9:50 AM, George wrote:

I think it's funny. I'm not a Republican, Republicans disgust me but Democrats are special, they horrify me. ^_^
TDD
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In teh 2000 election the Perpetually Perturbed in FL were upset because of a Police Presence a block or two from a polling place allegedly was put there only to intimidate voters. Chief noted that it was was an auto inspection check point that had been in business in the area for three day prior to the election.
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America is at that awkward stage. It's too late
to work within the system, but too early to shoot
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On Fri, 26 Oct 2012 23:23:41 +0000 (UTC), Doug Miller

Yep, that's why I keep some cream cheese on a plate in the fridge. So's I know by their footprints if some elephants are getting in there when I ain't looking.
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[total lack of response to this point noted with amusement, but not surprise]

Actually, they found hundreds, not just one. So, no, it's not a "made up issue". It's a very real issue, and as more and more states enact laws requiring proof of citizenship to register, and proof of identity to vote, more and more such problems will turn up.

Typical left-wing response: plenty of ad hominem attacks against the people who disagree with you, while failing to address the substance of their arguments.
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BS. Over 200 non-citizens were found on the voter rolls in Florida. But I'm sure you'll just keep spinning and denying the facts.
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On 10/26/2012 7:23 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

We used to live in an area in PA that was rated as being on par with Chicago for political corruption. Some time ago the media outlets analyzed the voting statistics and found that in many of the wards more people voted than were possible. Since PA is a purple state enough extra votes can make a difference.
However I am totally against the idea of "papers please" for any activity and even more offended when something is promoted as OK because requirements for presenting papers were added for other activities.

For sure.

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Of course you think that, because like most libs, it's all about emotion while ignoring the facts. Florida found 2600 where they were registered, but evidence suggested they were ineligible to vote. Florida tried to determine the status of those 2600, but the Obama administration refused to cooperate with simple things, like their immigration status. Even so, as of now, over 200 of them have indeed been verified to be non-citizens. The election in 2000 was decided in Fl by just 534 votes.

Yes, I agree. The issue of requiring some basic ID in order to vote is a completely made-up issue.
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The registrar has a signature on file. DFW recently had a case of a son voting in place of his father. The key to the case was the signature. Something the banks and the DA have been using for years to prosecute check fraud.
Want something more positive try a finger print scan. Again something the banks have been using for years.
Idea was offered at the hearings in Austin. Did not even make it to the table for consideration.

Again signature on file.
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