OT: Global Internet Maps

Looking at this I'm very surprised that two of the richest countries in the world, namely the USA and the UK are way down the list for the fastest broadband speeds. Blimey! even *Romania* and *Lithuania* beat us hands down. France is a big country and they are way above us both too. We should both be either at the top or very close to it.
Anyone agree?
http://www.internetsociety.org/map/global-internet-report/?gclid=CN6Q2I6OgcwCFUs6GwodD4QG0g#download-speed-fixed
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Bod

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On 4/9/2016 4:54 AM, Bod wrote:

All that indicates is the average speed of users. Considering the price of cable and internet on the rise (in the US), people usually purchase what suits their need, which is 50 Mbps or less. Therefore, the average will always be below that. I'm guessing internet service is cheaper in other countries. Proving once again the greed within the US.
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On 09/04/2016 11:28, Meanie wrote:

> You could be right. If you consider that Russia is not far behind in speeds and they have twice the land area of the US and have a fraction of the GDP of the US.
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Bod

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I suspect that they are only talking about people in the biggest cities in those countries. In the case of Hong King it is just one big city. As I said earlier, the cable companies have a choke hold on internet service for most of America and that is a secondary or tertiary business for them. In the case of a company like Comcast, TV and producing TV/movie content are #1 and #2 for them. Internet service is just a byproduct of their TV business and somewhat cannibalistic to the TV part. They don't have a good reason to make it go any faster.
We really should be separating data from content.
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This sounds somewhat like a pissing match. You need only 5 mbps to stream a hi-def movie. Unless you're doing downloads of different torrent files, or streaming multiple HD movies, you won't notice the difference between 5 mbps and 100 mbps. Of course you can go to one of the speed sites to measure your "performance," but that means nothing in terms of practical use. It's akin to various benchmarks used to test the speed of your graphics card, CPU, or memory.
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There's a theory about early adopters and such. I think it groups people in five categories. The early adopters buy the stuff when it's just marketed and expensive. It doesn't have all the bells and whistles that will come with later models or the bugs worked out. Wasn't the U.S. pretty much at the forefront of the internet? There's also a tendency to keep what works. Why buy a new car if the current one gets a person from point A to B?
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On Sat, 09 Apr 2016 05:49:26 -0500, "Dean Hoffman"

That certainly applies to the phone companies and their infrastructure. I know my DSL is a result of Sprint rebuilding a mom and pop phone company infrastructure back in the 80s when they thought land lines were still going to be a business. It is fiber backbone, electronic switching, digital transmission and copper for the "last mile". I get 10 meg DSL from that. They have extended FiOS to some homes, giving you pretty fast internet, TV and whatever but not where I am. I doubt they could charge enough extra to make it viable. If they were forward looking enough to drop fiber in the hole in 1986, could have Singapore speeds now although I am not sure why I would need it.
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On 04/09/2016 11:02 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

In most parts of the USA, people have a choice only between one phone company and one cable company. Where I live, the only choice is between Charter (cable) and AT&T (DSL or U-Verse) -- no Comcast or Verizon here, although Comcast is in the next municipality a mile or so away (but the people living there can't get Charter): most municipalities award an exclusive franchise to a single cable company.
Perce
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