OT: GE pays no income tax

Page 1 of 8  
I know you will be happy to read theMarch 25 NY Times article at
http://tinyurl.com/4av64cp
which details how mighty GE gets away year after year with paying NO income tax while luxuriating in tax breaks created by their helots in Congress -- in exchange for the usual bribes.
While thee & me bust our buns to come up with our taxes (April 15 approacheth) our corporate masters led by GE -- laugh all the way to the bank.
While at that Web site, be sure to check out the arrow to the lower left, which takes you to graphics reinforcing the powerful and powerfully nauseating NY Times article.
HB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's a good thing GE pays no taxes (if your claim is true)
Got any idea why companies are flooding into Ireland & Switzerland?
Hint: low corporate tax rates
If you want to push more companies overseas (or out of your state) lobby for high or even higher corporate tax rates. Take a look at what's happened to California. Business unfriendly locals have companies leave.
cheers Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It's a good thing GE pays no taxes (if your claim is true)
Got any idea why companies are flooding into Ireland & Switzerland?
Hint: low corporate tax rates
If you want to push more companies overseas (or out of your state) lobby for high or even higher corporate tax rates. Take a look at what's happened to California. Business unfriendly locals have companies leave.
cheers Bob
=========== There's a big difference between "low corporate taxes" and "no corporate taxes". Do you think it's right for American corporations to pay NO taxes based on money they make entirely within America?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Do you think its right that most foreign corporations pay no taxes on money they make entirely within America?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
harry wrote:

You say that like you think there's something wrong with the plan.

We're merely trying to rectify a geologic mistake. It's OUR oil under THEIR land. And we don't SEND anybody anywhere. They're all volunteers.

Heh! The POOR in our country have more than the RICH in some places. Virtually every poor person in America has a place to live, ample food, a car, a microwave, a large-screen TV, a cell phone, plenty of clothes (including $300 sneakers), access to health care, and more.
The POOR in our country live better - and longer - than over half the world's population.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The $300 sneaker comment is a hint of something else. I think you know what I mean.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
harry wrote:

Sure, I'm aware of it.
The people who live like that do so, in the main, because they WANT to live like that. Usually their mental facilities are distressed, but, if they refuse help, it's their choice. We can no longer lock them up in insane asylums because back in the 70's we set our crazies free! There are crazies in the meadows, crazies in the barn, crazies in the outhouse, crazies in the corn, there were crazies driving Cadillacs to Washington, D.C., when we set or crazies free.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

More garp. If it were true, why do so many poor people buy lottery tickets? Because they WANT to stay poor? Of course not. They hate their circumstance but have no way out except by winning the lottery.
You're spinning out of control HeyBub, but keep it up. Obama will need your help and debunking your outlandish claims seems to be one of the better ways to provide it. You're fast on your way to becoming the Sarah Palin of AHR. (-: I don't believe Obama could have won without McCain putting her on the ticket, a heartbeat away from the Presidency.
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Staying in school, staying out of jail, avoiding drugs, not getting pregnant at 14 and then having 3 more kids worked for most of us. But I guess that no longer works and the only choice now is the lottery.

You're already the Michael Moore of the group.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/30/2011 9:39 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

We now have something called the "service economy". At one time average folks who maybe weren't college material could do as you described and maybe work at a manufacturer where they made enough money to buy a house etc. Now manufacturing is largely gone and those folks are stuck in jobs like working at Walmart for $8.25/hour. That wage puts someone in the poverty level. At one time those jobs would have been considered a stepping stone to something else but in a "service economy" they are a career. That is the reason Walmart can trumpet "see we aren't a crappy employer because 5,000 people waited in line for jobs when we opened store number 7899".
Times have changed and lots of folks don't seem to notice. Are you proud that this is the first time in the history of the US where children are statistically likely to have lower incomes than their parents?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Someone who is well off and has pretty much always been well off has a very hard time understanding what it's like to be a single mom with two kids trying to hold down a secretarial or service job. I know the bosses where I worked were like that - they couldn't comprehend the concern of a mother who gets a call at work saying "the school closed early" and to come and get their kid hours before they were supposed to be home. All they knew is "we should fire her, she's not here every second we want her to be."
It's *so* easy to say "live right and all good things will come to you" but the reality is something far different. People living on the edge get socked with bounced check fees that until recently could mean you pay $200 in fees for a $10 check for groceries that bounced through no fault of your own - other than not having enough extra money to leave in a checking account. When you have jobs that pay $8.25 an hour you can never save enough to get ahead. It's so easy for those who have been blessed to think everyone started from the same position that they did. It just isn't true. Tiny differences magnify themselves over time.

Excellent point. If people didn't WANT to work, why would they line in the thousands for crappy jobs? Because that's all that's open to them. With the cost of a college education soaring and its value in this job market becoming more and more dubious, it really isn't a stepping stone anymore, it's a millstone around people's necks. I know a lot of kids saddled with incredible debt upon graduation that can't find a whisper of work in their fields.

Sadly, part of the problem is the guys that pull down over 100 million dollars by basically robbing pension funds. They produce no goods or services but like termites eat at the very foundation of our country's economy to enrich their parasitical live styles. The same is true of arbitragers that take successful companies like Simmons and saddle them with debt that they never intend to pay back, putting the money from destroying a profitable business into their personal accounts without a single thought to all the lives they are destroying in the process. That process is basically grand larceny, gussied up to look like "shrewd trading."
<<William E. Simon, a private equity pioneer and a Treasury secretary under President Richard M. Nixon, was the man with the golden touch. In 1986, his investment firm, Wesray Capital, and a handful of Simmons's top managers acquired the company for $120 million, the bulk of which was borrowed. After selling several businesses to pay back some of the money it had borrowed, Wesray cashed out in 1989. It sold Simmons to the company's employee stock ownership plan for $241 million - twice what it paid just three years earlier. The deal was a fiasco for the employees.>> http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/05/business/economy/05simmons.html?pagewanted=print
We've been handsomely rewarding these buyout kings for destroying both jobs and America's manufacturing capacity. Now we're reaping the whirlwind.
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 1 Apr 2011 01:23:34 -0400, "Robert Green"

I consider my mechanic son as much a "success" as any of my other kids who have college degrees and "professional" jobs. He's the happiest of the lot, and also the only one who can fix my cars. Work hard, sleep good, wake up smiling. It's the housing market that failed, not him. That's now correcting.

Though I agree with all that, it often just doesn't work. You just mentioned the "only currently employed considered" and "overqualified" conundrums. You need jobs for people to work. Forced training doesn't work. Especially when there's no job at the other end. Nothing wrong with a laid off IT worker or machinist retraining to become a doctor or nurse, but many can't cut it. People will do a lot to support their families. In 1982 I got laid off from my first IT job and went on unemployment for the first and last time. There were no jobs that I could get that would pay my bills and feed my family. I looked hard. Nominally, the unemployment rate was worse then than now. I took the unemployment checks, and worked off the books for a neighbor's son plumber getting about 16 hours a week at 10 bucks an hour. That's how I survived. Call me a crook. If I spent 8 hours a day looking for work that brought home less than I was getting, or training for a non-existent job, that would have busted me. About the same time unemployment ran out my plumber "pal" stopped asking me to work for him. Maybe coincidentally the last time I worked with him I refused his offer to toke a joint he lit up. Never been much for that at all, but certainly not on the job. Was I a victim of discrimination? Anyway, this guy was one of hustlingest hardest working guys I ever met so I don't hold his pot use against him. Paranoid prick. Pot users are often paranoid and it wasn't the first time somebody thought I was a narc. So I responded to an ad that had been running for half a year, wanting a packaging machine operator. I had a couple years experience as a packaging machine mechanic and operator. This new job was at Cloud Packaging and they had just scored a Nutri-Sweet contract from Searle Labs. Old man Cloud interviewed me and offered me 5 bucks an hour. I told him I would lose my house on that so he went to 5.50 and bumped me to 6 a few months later. Winter of 83-84 rolled around and I was worried about paying my heating bill. I had been making 6 bucks an hour in '68 as a single man, and here I am in '83 with a wife, 3 kids and a mortgage making the same. Well, just in time the economy came back and IT headhunters found me. Took care of my money woes right there. Problem is, I don't see this economy coming back like it did then. Global economy, no national jobs plan, no manufacturing base, Wall Street billionaires running the show, etc. I googled Cloud and now their "business activity" is "importer." So even my old escape hatch is now gone. Don't look good to me. But I believe things will adjust well enough so there's no revolution. Might be that "advanced" age affects my views. Probably going through some hard times when I was young didn't affect me as much as just thinking about them does now. I try to keep that in mind.
--Vic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"harry","Robert Green" and "George" wrote in message
<stuff snipped>

l?pag...
<Most of what you say is true. However apart from parents, there is no such thing as "luck". You take the consequences of descisions yoo made earlier. Starting off with likely, not doing homework and bunking off school.>
There's luck everywhere. I was in the right place at the right time when a lot of things happened related to my career. I've had this discussion with friends as to how they ended up doing what they did and very few said "it was clear planning every step of the way." Instead, it's "someone said I should apply for job X" or I just went through the want ads and found something.
Luck is a powerful component of lots of people's success. Maybe a more Spockish "random chance" would cover it better, but some of the biggest twists and turns in my life have just been blind luck, and thank the stars, I've been very lucky to have jobs that I enjoyed immensely and that paid a decent wage with decent benefits. I can recall saying to myself: "Do you believe they are paying you to take pictures of famous people and beautiful women? That was during a stint for "Today Is Sunday" - a very short-lived Parade competitor. I was tasked with photographing bikini models in the US Botanical Gardens in the middle of winter.
Some people spend their entire lives doing things that they don't like very much. )-: Of the many regrets I'll probably experience on my death bed, at least I can say I always enjoyed what I did. Mostly. I didn't like sales work (Westinghouse Security) and I wasn't so fond of being a short-order cook, but by and large, the long-lasting jobs were fun and for the most part, obtained by being in the right place, etc. Lucky.
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

"Luck" is directly proportional to preparation. You make your own "luck".

You slagged off at school and at work and still got these jobs?

If they don't like what they're doing, it's not bad luck that's responsible. Some will never like work. Some don't like life. We call them "Democrats".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

<True, but random chance can turn out either way. The thing is, the odds are changed by one's choices. Eg If you take up smoking you increase the chance of dying of lungcancer orheart disease. Conversely. I f you study at school you increase that chance of having a good income and owning nice things. One of the important things is finding the right woman. There is an element of luck in that. So, if you do sensible things, it hugely the balance in your favour.>
Yes, doing sensible things *should* shift the balance in your favor but there's no human being more disappointed than the person who ate right, exercised, had no vices and still gets cancer anyway. It happens all the time. When I grew up (across the street from a convent) there was a nun dying of a brain tumor who would scream all night. I can remember lying in bed on a hot summer night listening to her wailing wondering why God would choose to punish one of his own so severely. I still don't know the answer to that one.
I just know that personally I have been incredibly lucky and I thank whatever powers that be for that luck. Yes, I went to school, etc. but the bottom line is that the right job always seemed to appear at the right time and random chance drove that process. Luck.
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote: <stuff snipped>

< Yes, that is exactly right. Also in the UK. All that is left is services and innovation. We still make lots of cars, 85% are exported, more than ever before. They are mostly made by "robot", thus not many jobs are created. Robots are probably the only way to go to defeat the Chinese wage slaves. >
That's correct. The problem is who's going to be left to buy the goods produced by robots if no one has a job?
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert Green wrote:

The people in countries that don't have robots?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm sure the exact same lament for the good old days went on when the car replaced the buggy, when the backhoe replaced the ditch digger, and when the nail gun replaced, the hammer....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

< So, if you have lost your job and your house that makes you a "crazy"? Where/when did you do the research that leads to this conclusion?>
Many of HeyBub's proclamations spring from his head the way Athena popped out of Zeus's and have the same level of believability as a woman springing fully grown, clad in armor, from someone's head. Like the Greek myths, you have to learn to appreciate them for their entertainment value, and not necessarily their veracity.
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert Green wrote:

Uh, no, I reached no such conclusion. How did you reach the conclusion that I had reached such a conclusion?
I was referring, in the main, to people who live under bridges or in "tent cities" (aside from those provided free of charge by Sheriff Arapio). I have no portfolio for someone, as you describe, who lost their home, etc., and had to move back in with his parents.
As for "research," much is apocryphal. My sweetie is an intake clinician at a mental health hospital. She has a couple of master's degrees and more than 30 years experience in dealing with the mentally distressed (not including me).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.