OT/ Garage Sale Score!

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$10 in better than "good" condition...no charger or battery. I took it to a hardware store to try it with a battery...so I know it is worth investing about $85 for a battery and charger on eBay! Wahoo!
https://www.milwaukeetool.com/power-tools/cordless/2610-20
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On 11/25/2015 9:09 AM, bob_villain wrote:

Yep, you done good. That qualifies as a "You Suck!"
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On Wednesday, November 25, 2015 at 9:10:02 AM UTC-6, bob_villain wrote:

So, it cost me $115 total...eBay was $175 (for a kit) in poor condition for the same, with 2 old batteries.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Milwaukee-M18-18-Volt-Lithium-Ion-5-0Ah-Starter-Kit-48-59-1850/205794132
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On Wednesday, November 25, 2015 at 10:10:02 AM UTC-5, bob_villain wrote:

Investing $85 or spending $85?
While I agree that it's a great find and probably worth buying a battery and charger, what makes the $85 an "investment"?
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On Thursday, November 26, 2015 at 6:49:18 PM UTC-6, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Funny thing to ask...1)a bare tool doesn't have much value; 2) a good tool *is* an investment.
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On Thursday, November 26, 2015 at 8:00:38 PM UTC-5, bob_villain wrote:

What do you expect to be the return on your investment?
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On Thursday, November 26, 2015 at 7:32:26 PM UTC-6, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Already stated...are you a lawyer, or just being a dick? (pretty much the same)
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On Thursday, November 26, 2015 at 10:12:23 PM UTC-5, bob_villain wrote:

Neither one. Just a guy asking a question.
Most definitions of an "investment" typically read something like this:
"An asset or item that is purchased with the hope that it will generate income or appreciate in the future."
So, I am simply curious. Are you contractor that will make money by using the tool? Is there some other reason that the tool will generate income or are you expecting it to appreciate in value?
There's a difference between a great deal on a tool (which you definitely got) and investing in tools for the purpose of making money with them. You said you were "investing" $85 for the battery and charger and I'm just curious about what income or appreciation you are expecting.
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On Thursday, November 26, 2015 at 11:06:44 PM UTC-6, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Truthfully, I think you're pulling my chain...but if you insist. With an investment of $115, I could get $175 to $225 for the kit. For me, it's an ultimate tool that I wouldn't normally be able to own. I hope this will satisfy your curiosity.
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On Friday, November 27, 2015 at 12:39:02 AM UTC-5, bob_villain wrote:

You probably could get more for the kit than you paid for it, but I'm pretty sure that that is not your plan.
Your purchase certainly qualifies as a great deal, but since your intent is to keep it for your own use, the $85 spent on the battery and charger is not really an investment.
I hope that you get many years of enjoyment from your tool.
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On 11/27/2015 05:13 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

If the $85 was spent to avoid future outlays of $170 to third party services to charge batteries, is it an investment?
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On Friday, November 27, 2015 at 2:24:55 PM UTC-5, rbowman wrote:

Not as I see it. A cost saving measure, yes, but an investment? I think not. The object purchased (in this example) is not going to produce income or increase in value. Well, I guess eventually it might become a collector's item or a museum piece, but that is not why the battery and charger were purchased.
A Beanie Baby purchased for a kid to play with is a toy. A Beanie Baby purchased to be stored in its original package to be sold later at (hopefully) a higher price is an investment.
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On 11/27/2015 4:16 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

The challenge is to figure out which will be in demand, later. Makes me wonder which of all the consumer goods I had, wore out, trashed. Which of them would be worth millions, now to a collector?
I attend very few garage sales. I could had a big box of triple pole circuit breakers. Sold em on Ebay. I passed up the purchase. Maybe to my downfall.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
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On 11/27/2015 03:17 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

That is a problem. I remember one classic car auction where one of the items was a beautifully restored Corvair. At least that year you could hardly give the thing away.
A contrary example is the current bubble in the Colt 'snake' revolvers. Even then, it's only certain configurations of a Python, Diamondback, or the others that brings the top buck.
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On Friday, November 27, 2015 at 6:13:31 AM UTC-6, DerbyDad03 wrote:

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You seem to be too literal in your definition. Maybe you are a banker or in vestor...to a hobbyist or tradesman, a good tool *is* an investment. In my instance, there is a little Tim the Toolman testosterone enhancement factor also! 750 in/lb of torque! Ohohohoh!
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On Friday, November 27, 2015 at 9:30:11 PM UTC-5, bob_villain wrote:

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an investment of $115, I could get $175 to $225 for the kit. For me, it's an ultimate tool that I wouldn't normally be able to own.

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investor...to a hobbyist or tradesman, a good tool *is* an investment. In m y instance, there is a little Tim the Toolman testosterone enhancement fact or also! 750 in/lb of torque! Ohohohoh!
To a tradesman, I agree. I've been saying that all along. I'm a hobbyist an d a homeowner. I have lots of tools. I also own 4 cars. I recently bought a bunch of tools to make doing brakes and other "minor" repairs a lot easier. I bought them to *save*'mone y, but I don't consider them to be an investment because I'll never *make* (or lose) any m oney with them.
I have made a few things that I got paid for, but none of the tools were bo ught for those purposes. However, after I made a couple of the items by buying just enough material to complete each job, I realized that I would probably be able to sell a few m ore. The next time someone asked me to make them one, I *invested* in enough material to make 4 at the same time. It took a few months, but I eventually sold all of my "in ventory". My investment paid off since I sold the items for more than I paid for the mat erial.
I'd like to know why you say a good tool is an investment to a hobbyist. If I am too literal in my definition, soften it for me and tell how something fun to play with is an investment.
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On Fri, 27 Nov 2015 21:29:31 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Nearly all general definitions of "investment" go like this: "the act of putting money or effort into something to make a profit or achieve a result." So that covers hobbyists too. It's really pretty simple. It's clear from simple analysis of conversation too. For example how many shade tree mechanics are advised to invest in a compressor and air tools? A few years ago I invested in a 10" compound mitre saw with the expectation that it would be a profitable. It wasn't "fun" using it. But my wife wanted crown molding in two large rooms. She got it. I haven't used that saw since then, but it was a profitable investment.
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<stuff snipped>

Way back when I "invested" a bit of money buying 2 Chromega XL 4 by 5" enlargers so I could make 20 by 24" color enlargements from large format negatives (mostly 'Blads'). Enlargers are a lot like printing money <g>. I am about to sell them now that large format silver-based photography is making a comeback. Whatever I get will just add to the thousands of dollars those two machines have enabled me to make over the years. I started as a hobbyist and ended up doing it professionally and the money I spent on them has been recouped many times over.
I'd define a good investment as something you expect to make money for you in the here and now or be worth more than you put into it in the future. A bad investment would be something like VW stock. (-:
--
Bobby G.




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On Saturday, November 28, 2015 at 12:21:34 PM UTC-6, Robert Green wrote:

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On Saturday, November 28, 2015 at 12:21:34 PM UTC-6, Robert Green wrote:

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?.?^?.? +1
I wonder if the folks buying up VW because the price is low are going to recoup their investments? I know at least two people who invested in companies that were in trouble that later got into REAL trouble and vanished from the face of the earth. (The companies, not the investors!) I laughed when I saw the film '2001' at a 2001 revival and the space planes proudly proclaimed Pan Am Airlines. Pan Am didn't even last the 30 or so years from when the film was made.
--
Bobby G.



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