OT - Funny Response From Time Warner Cable Regarding Modem

Page 2 of 2  
On 10/25/2012 08:21 PM, Han wrote:
[snip]

True about the DHCP (and some do DNS too), although that shouldn't require much speed. That's why I didn't mention that before. You would get gigabit speed between devices connected to that switch.
BTW, I recently replaced my router. The old one was limited to about 12Mbps for interent, and my ISP got faster than that. The new router will abow the up to 20Mbps I can get now. It also has 802.11n WiFi and a gigabit switch. The old router is still there just as an additional switch for slow devices.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This just shows I don't know how things work:
If I sent a file between two laptops wired to the switch, isn't the router/DHCP server needed to tell the switch which is which laptop? Or is it so that once the switch is told by the DHCP server that the blue wire on port 1 goes to the blue laptop and the black wire on port 4 to the black laptop, that the DHCP server isn't needed anymore? For how long does that work?
Or does the switch send the whole file (in packets) to the router/DHCP server, which then sends it back with the port #/DHCP address of the other machine?
--
Best regards
Han
email address is invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/26/2012 03:17 PM, Han wrote:

[snip]
DHCP is used by each computer when the PC is first booted or connected to the network. This is how your computer gets a network address. If is not used for individual transfers.

The DHCP server does not control the switch. As far as I can tell, the switch creates a table associating devices with physical ports. It does this by examining the data passing through it.

A file transfer between computers does not in any way go through your internet router. It is sent directly to it's destination. Like mail, the data has a destination address on it. The switch knows where it goes, and the PC you're sending it to knows it's own address and accepts it.
In most cases, the router never sees it (the switch doesn't send it to the router).
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks, I think. But if I turn my router off, how long before the switch "forgets" the destination addresses?
There have been a few (thankfully just a few) instances were things got totally muffed up in the sense that I couldn't "go" anywhere anymore (mostly the internet), and I got things right again by turning everything off, then turning them on again, starting with the router, then the switch, then the computers.
--
Best regards
Han
email address is invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
[snip]

The switch should never forget as long as it has power. This might be a problem when you're rearranging connections. In that case, reset the switch.
DHCP is needed ONLY when a computer first connects to a network, unless you manually renew a lease (seldom needed) or a lease expires (often 24 hours later).

DNS could have gotten confused. Restarting everything clears the cache (memory) and usually fixes it.
You probably don't need DNS for local connections (on your own network).
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks again! Now everything is clear ...
--
Best regards
Han
email address is invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/24/2012 4:53 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

In my area, the cable company and the phone company are engaged in a broadband subscriber war. Result: phone company is providing a free modem, free install, and a bunch of other freebies. No price increase for five years guaranteed with no contract required.
They made it easy to choose them over Comshaft.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Actually, the cheapest modem on their "approved" list is $54. I'm sure the $3.95 x 12 has some taxes and "surcharges" added, so it may end up being about 1 year wash. Even if I had to buy a new modem every year to stay up to date with any new features they add (which won't happen) it makes sense to buy, which is my plan.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/23/2012 9:14 PM, Jeff wrote:

Comcast has jacked their modem rental fee up to $7 earlier this year. I bought a cable modem when they first started the rental fee @ $3. I could have purchased four more since then with the money we saved.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/24/2012 06:08 AM, George wrote:

I bought my current modem used from the local e-recycler for two bucks, and it's been running just fine for the last year.
Modem rental is for suckers.
Jon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.