OT - Full Size Spare - Or Is It?

Page 3 of 4  


They were closed when I returned the vehicle, so I didn't ask them. I left a note for them to call me about the "inconvenience" of having to top off the tire (twice). I'm hoping they'll credit me for some amount, although they already gave me a pretty good deal - a one day rental credit if I paid for the insurance coverage, which was less than the one day rental. In other words, I got the coverage but still paid less than I would have if I had declined the coverage and paid the full rental cost. I'm assuming they make more money on the insurance than the rental, so we all made out on the deal.
Anyway, when they call me, I"ll ask about the spare. Of course, I'm sure I can already tell you what he'll say. "If the spare says stay under 50, then I recommend you stay under 50.“ What else could he say? It's not like he's going to tell me to ignore the warning and drive at whatever speed I want.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've changed one tire since 1986 (it may be longer than that).
I think the advantage of a spare tire is overrated.
YMMV, if you drive a lot of miles over bad roads.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've lost track of how many tires I've changed just in the past year.
On my daughter's car alone I've had the spare on at least 6 times since we bought the car (used) in April.
In the first month, 3 of the 4 tires went low because of the aluminum wheels. I'd throw the spare on, drop the low tire off at a local shop, have them clean the wheel and fill it up. Over the summer she ran over a nail and a screw with a week of each other. She doesn't drive any place "bad" - just normal roads and parking lots. She works at a YMCA, so it's not like she parking in industrial areas with trucks, construction vehicles, etc.
We bought her new tires for winter and she hit a pothole within the first week, damaging a sidewall. It was covered under the road hazard warranty, so I threw the spare on, drove it over to the shop and they put a new tire on the rim without making me wait. If I had left it on the car I would have had to wait my turn until a bay was open.
With a floor jack, my cordless drill and a pipe to use as leverage, I can put the spare on in under 15 minutes, less than half hour total on and off. If I leave the tires on the vehicles when they need service, it's hours of waiting to get into a bay. I don't have that kind of patience.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 30 Dec 2013 19:26:00 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

Whatever works for you. I call first and if I'm told there's going to be a wait I have the come along in the second car, and just drop off the car getting the work done. Call me when it's done. But there's a Just Tires less than a mile away.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's what we do if one of our vehicle needs work that requires the vehicle to be left at the shop. With three vehicles and three drivers working, doing without one vehicle for a day - especially just for a tire - is a pretty big inconvenience. I'd rather throw the spare on and drive than arrange transportation, etc.
Like you said, whatever works.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<...snipped...

When my daughter got her driver's license I taught her how to change a tire. You may want to consider doing the same... :)
--
There is always an easy solution to every human problem -- neat,
plausible, and wrong." (H L Mencken)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

She knows how to change a tire. She actually changed it a couple of the 6 times. I don't mind doing it, but I know she can do it if she has to. Of course, she also has AAA so while I wouldn't expect her to be changing a tire on the side of the highway, I know that she could if she had to.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 31 Dec 2013 00:30:58 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lonestar.org (Larry W) wrote:

usually around in case she had trouble. Now she's got a truck mechanic for a boyfriend, and he comes over and changes them, and even gets mine out of the attic of the shed for me, and helps put the takeoffs back up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, December 30, 2013 7:30:58 PM UTC-5, Larry W wrote:

I've taught my daughters just in case. But when the shop puts on the lugnuts with an air wrench, it's usually impossible for them to break them loose, and often for me. One time we couldn't get them off jumping on a cheater bar.
I guess there's supposed to be a torque setting on those things but it must be routinely ignored.
Question: do you guys put the bolts/nuts (depending on the car) on dry with the recommended torque? Or do you lube them and reduce the torque? I normally never put a fastener on dry, but I've been unsure about wheels.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/31/2013 8:19 AM, TimR wrote:

impossible for them to break them loose, and often for me. One time we couldn't get them off jumping on a cheater bar.

you lube them and reduce the torque? I normally never put a fastener on dry, but I've been unsure about wheels.

This has as much heated opinion and toilet paper over the top or under the bottom. My opinion is to lube the threads and mating cone point with grease or Never-Sieze. Torque with clicker torque wrench, and recheck the next day and the second day. Others will quote Aristotle, Mack, Ford, or just tell me that I'm mistaken.
I've had a wheel fall off twice. Once when it started to rain the day I was working. I slipped the lugs on finger tight, and neglected to torque them. This was about 1980 model Chevette, with steel rims.
Second time was a 98 Blazer with aluminum rims. I put the lugs on with torque wrench but didn't recheck the next day and on day two. The lugs were under snap cap, and I didn't see that they were loose. I thought I had a backwards radial on the other corner, and didn't visually or wrench check the one that was loosening.
Both of those were my neglect, and I take responsibility.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The only time I've had a wheel loosen up is when a service center put the wrong wheels on my vehicle.
I had my dead Subaru towed to a service station late on a Saturday night. I didn't make an appointment because they were closed until Monday. I had used the service station before and since my car was dead, I decided to have it towed there with the plan to call them Monday morning. I told the tow truck driver to put the car behind the station, pointed towards the service bay door so that they could push it into the shop when they were ready.
I called them first thing Monday morning and they said they were wondering what the car was doing behind their shop, balanced on 3 concrete blocks with no wheels. To this day, I believe the tow truck driver was involved with the theft of the wheels and brand new tires, but there was obviously no way I could prove it. He would have been the only one who knew the car was behind the station, unless someone else went back there looking for vehicles to mess with.
Anyway, the service station located some used wheels (the wagon wheel style) and new tires and put them on the vehicle. I picked it up after the repair was done and proceeded to drive 300 miles to my parent's house for the holidays. The car felt fine while driving on the highway but when I slowed for a toll booth, the steering wheel started shimmying. I pulled off of the road and found that a couple of lugs were loose on the front wheels. I tightened them up and continued on my way. When I got to my parent's house, the car felt funny again, so I checked the wheels and found that _all_ of the lug nuts were loose and some of the studs were stripped.
It turned out that the wheels they put did not fit over the hub correctly. They were being held onto the car with just the lug nuts, with no support from the hub. I had to take it to a shop to have a few of the studs replaced. It took them a few days to locate the correct wheels so I was stuck without a car and delayed in getting home.
My insurance company covered the original theft of the wheels and the service station covered the cost of the replacement wheels and stud repairs after I threatened to report them to any and all groups and authorities I could think of.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 31 Dec 2013 14:36:59 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

and they use the same studs and nuts.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's not clear to me what you are trying to say. Please explain.
This was a 1986 Subaru. The bolt pattern of the "wrong" wheels was the same as the correct ones, but the wheels definitely did not fit the car correctly. If my memory serves me correctly (it's been a while) the center of the wheel did not fit over the hub and therefore the wheels were not "inboard" enough.
Rough numbers, picture a tapered hub on the car, with a max diameter of 3". Now picture a wheel with a 2.75" hole in the center. The wheel fit over the hub and studs but not all the way in against the rotor. There was a gap that allowed the wheel to move side to side while driving, eventually loosening the lug nuts and damaging the studs. The mechanic probably just tightened the lug nuts, never realizing that the wheel was not seated up against the rotor.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 31 Dec 2013 19:21:39 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

SMALL for the hub. I thought you were blaming the problem on the wheel center being too LARGE for the hub. Yes, if the rim could not seat all the way it WOULD cause a problem, and the "mechanic" who installed the wheels was blind and dumb.
The "mechanic" likely attempted to install Toyota wheels. The Soob takes metric 5 wheels - 5 on 100, with 56.1 counterbore. The Toyota bolt circle is the same, but the counterbore is a lousy 2mm smaller (at 54.1mm)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<...snipped...>

"Counterbore" ?
--
There is always an easy solution to every human problem -- neat,
plausible, and wrong." (H L Mencken)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 31 Dec 2013 23:22:06 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lonestar.org (Larry W) wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/31/2013 6:22 PM, Larry W wrote:

A couple decades ago, I had a Dodge van, the rear wheels would not come off unless I used a torch. I finally chocked the front, took one rear wheel off, start the engine, and put it in reverse. Used a drill and grind stone to take down the hub a bit, until the wheels fit. And then did the same on the other side. No more propane torch to get the wheels off each time.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 31 Dec 2013 08:53:59 -0500, Stormin Mormon

Several years ago, I had Costco rotate my tires. They're supposed to use torque wrenches (with the manager checking all work, personally). A few days later I had the car inspected, without fanfare. A couple of hours later my wife called me, rather pissed, saying that a wheel passed her. Fortunately, she had just gotten off an Interstate and was on a side-street. The wheel chewed itself up pretty well, broke a couple of lug nuts, and did some significant damage to the fender on its way to freedom. No one took responsibility, of course.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I do not torque and I rarely lube. I lube if I feel the lug nut binding when I'm taking it off or putting it back on. If it comes off easily, it typically goes back on easy.
This is the technique I learned years ago:
To loosen the lugs, I jack the vehicle up just enough to take most of the weight off of the tire, but not enough to loose contact with the ground. Once the lugs are slightly loose, I jack the vehicle up until the tire is off the ground and then remove the lug nuts and tire.
I reverse the procedure when installing the tire. I snug the lug nuts enough to draw the tire up against the hub and then lower the vehicle until the tire touches the ground. Once the tire has a little weight on it, I tightened the lug nuts until I feel that they are "tight enough".
I've never had a lug nut become loose using this procedure and I've always been able to get the lug nuts off when I've wanted to.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, December 31, 2013 9:37:01 AM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Yeah, that works fine IF the guy with the air wrench at the shop who last tightened them did it somewhere close to properly.
I find this to be rare. I don't know why exactly. Usually they are way too tight.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.