OT: For the computer gurus

Page 1 of 4  
Will be purchasing a new laptop. Are there any methods to avoid installing the overbearing bundled software I don't want or do I resort to the uninstall process one at a time?
Thank you
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not a guru- but;
Buy a copy of Windows 7. [or whatever the latest Mac software is]
Wipe the drive. Install the operating system.
OTOH-- *I* wouldn't worry about it.
If you buy a decent laptop it won't even notice the bloatware.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 02-03-2013 08:14, Jim Elbrecht wrote:

I got a laptop recently for someone else. Windows 8 is tolerable, though I don't like it.
Unfortunately, my firend is visually impaired, and trying to enable any of those features pretty much trashed everything.
--
Wes Groleau

Words of the Wild Wes
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What I've normally done is prepare by downloading the free program "pcdecrapifier" to a USB drive and on the new PC NOT connected to a network, insert and run that program. It will ask you several questions about what you want to do and/or keep and when its done, connect to the network and register your OS. All the updates will then come down.
You may also wish to preload an anti-virus progrom onthe USB and run it before connecting as well.
Hope this helps and good luck.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I think it's wise to get your favorite antivirus program, downloaded to CD or flash drive. Load that onto the computer before you connect to the internet, and go immediately to their web page for updates.
I got a desktop back from the shop, one time. Checked my email before the anti virus install. Jammed the computer with virus. Back to the shop for a few more days of work. I'll never make that mistake again.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
You may also wish to preload an anti-virus progrom onthe USB and run it before connecting as well.
Hope this helps and good luck.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 3 Feb 2013 09:11:12 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

No reason to buy anything. Microsoft Security Essentials works just fine and it's free.

You must be pretty careless.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Where you buy it makes a difference. If you go to Best Buy or other big box sores, they seem to be loaded with every imaginable useless program available. If you buy from a real computer dealer that works with commercial accounts, you can get away with much less of that crap.
I buy from Denis. He has built probably 20+ computers for me over the years, both home and at work. He does not build the laptops, but it was junk free when I got my wife's from him http://dgcomputerconsulting.com /
Sure, you can buy from him, but there are hundreds of little shops that do similar work. If you go to the Products page http://dgcomputerconsulting.com/Products.html#cat= you will see how it can be customized for your needs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I bought direct from HP about a year ago. The only extras on it were Norton, which I wanted and the HP support assistant that looks for driver updates, etc. The PCs I bought used to be loaded with a lot of crap like free internet offers, etc, but that greatly decreased over the years.
I agree with Ed. If you want one that is totally clean, one option is one of the houses that will build a system to your specifications, where you choose the MB, box, OS, etc. But of course there are tradeoffs with that as well.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

You wanted NORTON?
Good God, man. What for?
Norton is the barnacle of the software world. Not only does it consume upwards of 5% of your CPU resources, it is VERY difficult to remove.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Since you're obviously not using Norton, how would you know how hard or easy it is to remove? A few months ago, I had a problem where it stopped working. I removed it using the normal control panel process and re-installed it, no problem. Using 5% of CPU resources? So, what? PC is plenty fast with Norton on it. Any of the anti-virus products have their advantages and disadvantages. Norton has worked fine for me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 3 Feb 2013 10:19:52 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Norton works OK and I have it one some computers at work. MS Security Essentials works just as well and it is FREE.
Don't forget Malwarebytes too. It does what most AV software does not. www.malwarebytes.org
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Give an honorable mention to Comodo Internet Security which is also free and well regarded.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/3/2013 3:03 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Symantec sells two versions of the "norton" product. The home version became overdone bloatware. The corporate version is essentially a much better written lighter weight product. The corporate version used to be just as bad as the home version but they cleaned it up because they were losing so much market share.
The MS product recently fell off the list of that group whose name I can't remember who certifies anti virus products and their detection rate went way down.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/3/2013 1:19 PM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Norton is free from my isp, Comcast. New computer with 2 months free Norton was not hard to overwrite with new Norton. Previous computer with McAfee and provider offering free McAfee, computer would not accept overwrite and I had to remove old McAfee before installing free McAfee. I would not assume that PITA old anti-virus is the same as today's versions. These things constantly change.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/3/2013 8:55 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Depends what aisle you are in. Friend just bought a low end hp notebook and it had at least 15 pieces of hp revenue enhancing software on it.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Did they buy it direct from HP or in a retail store, eg BestBuy? I wonder if some of the extra stuff depends on where you buy the same product, which may be what you're saying.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Per Ed Pawlowski:

I do the uninstall process one-at-at-time with an additional twist: When I am done, I use a disk imaging utility to create an image in case I need to restore the system and don't want to go through the one-at-a-time routine.
To make this work, I always re-partition the drive into:
- C:\ for the system (50 gigs is more than enough)
- D:\ for data - the remaining drive space
Then I embrace the discipline of not putting data on the system drive and keeping notes on anything that I do to the system (like installing new applications, changing settings...)
Sounds good, but I always mess up with something and leave some data on C:.
To cover that, I select an imaging utility that can open an image as if it were another drive. Then, before re-imaging, I take an image of the system tb replaced in case I have to recover some mis-saved data from the old system.
Sounds kind of convoluted now that I'm reading what I just wrote.
But it's really quite simple and quick once one gets the process down pat. In the past I've had a teenager banging on my PC for a couple hours per day. In that context, I got to where I would re-image the system if I even *though* something was amiss. The process takes less than 30 minutes. It's also helpful later on when the inevitable system slowness sets in..... just re-image to that "Good" system and performance comes back.
For the life of me, I cannot understand why computer vendors persist in dedicating the entire drive to C:\System and/or why the distinction between "System" and "Data" hasn't become a sort of semi-religion among computer users.
--
Pete Cresswell

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 02-03-2013 10:40, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

There are a lot of people that have an irrational fear that they will fill up one of the partitions and create a boat anchor.
It's irrational because today's computers aren't heavy enough to make a decent boat anchor. :-)
--
Wes Groleau

“Missing a train is only painful if you run after it!”
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They typically don't. In all the PCs I've bought, the system directory was a sub directory of the C: drive. It's also typical for the drive to ship with two partitions, one of them being a restore image to be used if needed.

It hasn't become a semi-religion among users because for the most part, they have no control over it. It's the system developers and app developers that decide where data goes. And there is no standard, so some of it can wind up just about anywhere. I agree, it's a frustrating problem that you would think would have been resolved by industry standards a long time ago. But as it is today, with a lot of apps, you have no idea where all of the data, settings, etc reside.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Windows, industry standards?
You're kidding right?
Linux doesn't use drive letters. No reasonable OS would. Also, no reasonable OS would mix user data with the OS. All my user data is in my home directory.
My home directory can be on one drive or as many drives as I need.
--
Dan Espen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.